Hot Potato: PG&E Offered the Potter Valley Project to the Eel Russian River Commission

Aerial photo of Scott Dam and Lake Pillsbury

Aerial photo of Scott Dam and Lake Pillsbury [Photo by Rob Badger; used with permission from Friends of the Eel River]

The future of Eel River water currently being diverted south by the Potter Valley Project was once again the subject of a tense meeting in Ukiah last Friday. 

At the gathering, PG&E offered to transfer the Potter Valley Project to the Eel Russian River Commission (ERRC). The conversation began in February and is causing the ERRC to reevaluate its sleepy role. The Potter Valley Project, a 9mw hydro-power plant has been transferring scores of acre-feet of water from the upper reaches of the mainstem of the Eel River into the Russian River for over a century now.  Santa Rosa and farming communities down the Russian River in both Mendocino and Sonoma counties have grown up depending on that free water transfer.

David Moller, PG&E Director of Power Generation, told the Commission PG&E’s need for power generation has declined due to the popularity of community produced solar power. Moller went on to explain the auction process and how the sale will fit into the FERC re-licensing process that continues apace.

Commissioner Estelle Fennel, representing Humboldt County, presented an approved Resolution from the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors defining Humboldt County’s interest in the Eel River, its perception that the dams need decommissioning, and its intention to work collaboratively toward a solution that meets the needs of both basins.

Tthe Commission scheduled an entire meeting to evaluate whether it might expand the role and membership of the ERRC to include the voices of the tribes and cities on the Eel River who have been denied access to a large portion of the river they depend on.  In August, the Commission will consider its own powers and will look at its role in determining the best path forward for these two rivers.

David Moller of PG&E reviewed PG&E’s decision to sell the hydropower project, the reasons for the sale, the process for selling the project, and how it intersects with the FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) relicensing process that is underway.

Moller said the PVP [Potter Valley Project] is no longer profitable to PG&E, selling it will have a negligible impact on PG&E’s renewable energy portfolio, and that the PVP is inconveniently located as all PG&E’s other hydropower projects are located in or near the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Mountains.

Moller said PG&E recognizes the non-power benefits of the project, primarily environmental, recreational and water supply.  Moller explained, “As I said in the letter, as we are preparing for the auction this fall, we are open to exploring with government entities the prospect of possibly transferring the project to a regional or local entity as an alternative to the auction. If there actually is such a discussion, we would assess progress on that and then decide whether to actually initiate an auction in the fall. Meanwhile, we will be preparing for [an auction.]

“We anticipate interest and participation from power suppliers, water suppliers, conservation groups, and tribes.”

When explaining why PG&E chose to auction the project over other options, Moller said,

The decision is complicated. It took us quite a while to reach this. In particular it’s complicated by the ongoing relicensing decision, and also consideration of the non-power benefits of the project and how that plays out and how it affects the communities…. We don’t look at it just from a power generation perspective. The auction was selected from among the options because we think it makes the most sense because it provides the opportunity for all entities to basically pursue their interests.

..As I noted in the letter, PG&E is open to transferring the project to a regional entity while we prepare for the auction. And this is really to provide a reasonable opportunity to put this regional asset into regional control.

..PG&E is continually in the middle, being pulled from both sides. No matter what we do most people are unhappy. So, the idea is to provide an opportunity to put this regional asset into regional control….what we are trying to do here is to create a process that doesn’t just focus on the continued operation of the project for power generation, but opens up the door for any interested party who has an interest in the future of the project to step forward and offer up their proposal.”

Moller said PG&E is currently selling off several small hydropower projects.  Merced Irrigation District is in the process of acquiring the 3.5 mw Merced Falls Project and the Yuba County Water Agency may be acquiring the 12mw Narrows Project on the Yuba River.  And hydropower projects on the Kern River and Tulle River are also going to auction currently according to Moller.

Moller said that offers are coming into PG&E for the Potter Valley Project and that he is “optimistic” the PVP will transfer during an auction process if it begins. Moller expects the Request for Offers phase of the sale to begin in September.  Interested parties determined by PG&E to have the capacity to afford the project and to successfully fulfill the FERC process and requirements will then sign Non-Disclosure Agreements and begin to look at PG&E internal documents before the interested parties submit offers of intention.

As far as the FERC re-licensing application for the PVP that is already underway, Moller said that the FERC deadline is statutory and must be met despite a transfer of ownership of the Project.  Moller explained that any entity that adopts the PVP will jump into the re-licensing process where-ever it stands at the time of sale.  Moller said, “They will simply slip into our shoes” in the FERC process.

Commissioner Jim Gore of Sonoma County asked for guidance from the County Council staff from Mendocino County that was present, saying he had to understand how to conduct himself as the Commission faced “a litany of frivolous and petty accusations. I say that very directly to a couple of people who haven’t even contacted me…”  Addressing Moller, Gore continued, “The real thing that I would say is … we don’t know what we are going to do with this. I don’t know what we are going to do with this. I don’t think anybody on this board knows what we are going to do with this.”

For background Friends of the Eel has accused Commissioner Fennell of abandoning Humboldt County’s interests in the Eel River to the interests on the Russian River, and all the Commissioners of violating the Brown Act by having discussions outside of the public sphere.  The Commission has received a PRA (Public Records Act) request made by Friends of the Eel River last month.

Gore didn’t understand how an organization operating under the Brown Act could negotiate a contract under an NDA.  Moller explained that the entity would explain in broad terms to its constituency that it is negotiating to acquire the project, but would not disclose PG&E’s proprietary information. And Commissioner Fennel reminded him that Closed Door Sessions are rather routine in government.

During Public Comment Friends of the Eel River’s new Executive Director, Stephanie Tidwell said that while the accusations may be in error they are not frivolous.

I had a more prepared statement but when our organization gets hostilely called “frivolous” from the dais, I feel obligated to respond with some of the facts as we see them. When we hear PG&E saying we are  interested in transferring the Potter Valley Project to a regional entity and we see the Eel Russian River Commission saying we are interested in strengthening ourselves as a regional entity, it’s pretty easy to draw the dots and think there is something going on behind the scenes that we aren’t privy to. And that may not be the case, but the fact of the matter is these are not frivolous concerns. Yes, we want our river back, and we want to know what’s going on.

Gore’s assertions that the ERRC has not yet agreed upon a plan rang true during the next two agenda items.  Commissioner Fennel of Humboldt County read into the record the entirety of Resolution 18-56 from the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors which begins “Whereas, the County of Humboldt believes that decommissioning a full or partial removal of the Potter Valley Project is inevitable due to the aging infrastructure, low power production, and high cost of upgrading the facility to comply with current dam safety and environmental regulation….’

Humboldt County’s Resolution 18-56 defines Humboldt County’s interest in the water saying, “The County of Humboldt will advocate strongly on behalf of the water users and natural resources within the County for water supply reliability, fish population that supports sustainable harvest opportunities, and full restoration of beneficial uses within the Eel River.”  And, “The County of Humboldt will advocate for elimination of summer and fall water diversions and restoration of the Eel River’s natural flow regime to restore and enhance fisheries, water quality, water supply and recreational opportunities.”

After reading this, Fennell invited Wyott Chairperson, Ted Hernandez, to read a tribal Resolution into the record stating the Wyott Tribe’s interest in being included in the Commission.

When the Commission took up the ad hoc committee recommendations on expanding the membership and authority of the Eel Russian River Commission under the JPA, Commissioner Carre Brown of Mendocino County reminded the Commissioners that the Commission has always been a forum that has never taken any action.  Brown said that had always been the Commission’s role. Brown also said she feels Native Americans have plenty of power in the process as it stands.  Twice Brown mentioned that the Tribes enjoy an elevated position in federal processes over local government.

Mr. Hernandez took the time to make public comment afterward. Hernandez said the Wyott Tribe was excluded from having a seat on the original Commission because in the 1970s, when the Commission was formed, tribes were still being excluded from recognition.  He went on to say that since gaining a voice, the Wyott have endeavored to restore damage done to the ecosystems.

Commissioner Gore from Sonoma County questioned why the Commission would expand if they aren’t going to take over operation of the Project. Gore expressed concern that the ERRC doesn’t have staff or funding to move toward accepting responsibility for the PVP. However, he did add, “I could be proven wrong.”

The Counties each have a differing interest in the Potter Valley Project’s water transfer.  Commissioner Jim Steele of Lake County is clear that Lake County is primarily interested in the fishing and recreational opportunities of Lake Pillsbury. Steele emphasized relying on the health of the fisheries in as the guiding principle for the Commission to base its decisions on. Steele feels the diversion aids fisheries in the Russian River, and that the PVP’s infrastructure provides summer flow to the Eel River that will not be available if the dams get removed.

Sonoma County counts on the Potter Valley Project’s diversion from the Eel River to make water available in the Russian River for fish habitat after the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA) makes its withdrawals for urban users.  SCWA serves regional suppliers, primarily in the Santa Rosa area, but including districts as far south as Marin County.

And Mendocino County depends on the water transferred by the PVP for many of its agricultural communities.  Potter Valley Irrigation District has long explained that without the Eel River, it has no water source whatsoever from late spring through the winter rains in October.

Both Ellen Faulk who lives near the dam and Friends of the Eel questioned the safety and integrity of the dam infrastructure.  Dave Keller of Friends of the Eel said that the Dam is built on unstable ground.  And he said in the event of a dam failure there could be a “30 foot wall of water” that would travel over an 8 hour period to the sea.

Keller explained that the public is shut out of the information that impacts their safety by FERC.  Keller also says that FERC refers to its ongoing dam safety schedule and will not allow dam safety concerns to be addressed in the relicensing process.

The counties that gain benefit from the dam do not have to live downsteam of its potential failure. Scott Dam did not enjoy positive peer review even at the time it was constructed. It has no emergency spillway.  It operates with a single electric gate available to release water from the top of the reservoir, and one bottom of the reservoir release known as the needle valve.  Furthermore, the dam’s alignment is askew due to the geology of hard stone sitting in a fractured matrix that slips around on occasion.  At the Commission meeting, Keller noted there are two fault seams running under the lake.

Faulk also expressed concern about the role the shallow reservoir plays in the bio-accumulation of mercury in the food chain.  Faulk said blue-green algae makes mercury in the environment bio-available.

Ultimately, the Commission determined it needs to devote an entire meeting to the prospect of increasing the size and scope of the Eel Russian River Commission.  Commissioner Gore complimented the scope and thoughtfulness of the Humboldt County Resolution and Commissioner Fennell encouraged her fellow Commissioners to engage in a similar process with their Boards of Supervisors.

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60 comments

  • Lets see where all the liberal urban elitist (Santa Rosa and wine growers) land on this very controversial environmental issue…threatened and endangered fish, water diversion during summer/fall, algae blooms, flow regime, river degradation, on and on….

    We already know the answer, they will vote to keep their water coming from the north, forget about the environmental impacts if it does not suit their needs!!

    Huffman and McGuire will be right behind Estelle selling out the Eel River, and Humboldt County once again. At a minimum they should pay a high price for whatever water is taken.

    • Lake Sonoma is usually full, Sonoma county has drained lake Mendocino in the past but kept lake Sonoma full for recreational purposes.
      If they had to follow the forbearance rules that canbabis growers do, the politicians would have to pay more for their wine

      • Just today Sonoma County supes passed a “two-basin” resolution. I figure that means they want water from the Eel to flow to our basin. I, for one, expressed concerns. They have not been forthcoming with us as to what they are up to. Here it is, the agenda item – Adopt a Concurrent Resolution Supporting a Two-Basin Solution for the Future of the Potter Valley Project

  • I’ll take it, that should be just enough for my grow, then I won’t have to buy it from the hydrants in town.

  • Sharpen your pencil

    Our ecosystem has suffered long enough, while those asshats to our south worry about green lawns and clean cars! When is enough enough?

  • Thank you Kym for this wonderful, illuminating post.

    Sometimes I do not agree with you, and have come to respect you for your diligence in bringing out all sides in your reporting. Appreciate it very much.

    When it comes time for more public input we will do so.
    Thanks again.

  • Oh the laughter!!!

    To paraphrase Judi Bari
    “PG&E stole our river
    We want our river back!”

    • PG&E didn’t steal the river. PG&E bought it from the company that stole the river

    • The Whole project barely created any power, the power generation was a ruse for water theft, “we need this water in the russian river so we can make power”……. nothing but wealthy white collar beuraucrats intent on stealing water for their wealthy friends wineries in Sonoma County….. time to do what is morally and environmentally correct and return the stolen water to its rightful watershed. End of story…. but these theives will try everything to keep the stolen water flowing South

  • Twinkle Winklestein

    Water is the key to everything! Let’s keep it clear, cool and clean. Flowing as Nature intends, down the canyons, and round the bends. To benefit from Truth we will see the proof through Crystal rivers, not dreams, so it seems that will make amends. Will these wars over water never end?

  • unbridled philistine

    All I care about are the Salmon! Everybody who thinks different should look in the mirror and question every life decision you have ever made! Another bottle of whine? Or some day our grandchildren catching a king and taking it home for supper? Pretty easy choice one would think… Save the Salmon!

    • Oh the laughter!!!

      The Yurok word salmon is the same as the word food. I agree.

    • I get such a kick out of the uninformed FOER folks that think if you removed the Dams after 100 years suddenly Salmon would flourish. Do these people not know that if Lake Pillsbury and the water diversion was not there and the water was not released throughout the year in 5 out of the last 10 years every fish in the river would have died because it would have been dried up in September! Not to mention that there are hundreds of species of birds / animals and fish that thrive now that the dams are in place and there is a lake with a consistent source of water. But true they are not Salmon and those salmon fisherman can’t catch and eat them but in my humble opinion there is more to life than Salmon. Go see the Elk, Eagles, Bears, Osprey, Heron or catch a trout, bluegill or bass in that lake you want to rip out

      • Dave Luhrs,
        How do you explain the huge numbers of fish (salmon and steelhead) that were observed and photographed prior to the installation of the dams? The fish in the Eel River system were extremely healthy and prolific. This all with no dams, the river did not dry up in September. We have abused the taking of the water at Van Arsdale, and the huge amount of cannabis farms in the upper Eel have made it what it is today.

      • So we should just forget about all the critters that depend on the Eel River along its 300 mile course because there are planty of critters at Lake Pillsbury and Lake Mendo…. I call ignorance and Bullshittery….. the Eel River has been harmed long enough by this water theft and blatant disregard, fisheries are hurting and the entire North Coast fishery and fishing industry as well as the tourist industry has been destroyed by this water diversion. Time to do what is right and return the water to the rightful watershed. Sonoma County can find their own water, not steal it and divert it away from the Eel River.

      • Eel River Kayaker

        You gotta be joking…. right, “Go see the Elk, Eagles, Bears, Osprey, Heron or catch a trout, bluegill or bass in that lake you want to rip out”……. the Eel River supports way more life than that, besides ever eat a Blue Gill or Bass…. yuck! The Eel River supports Otters, Beavers, Salmon, frogs, turtles, osprey, owls, deer, Elk, samanders, Coho Salmon, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead, trout, raccoons, mountain lions, bears, skunk, squirrel, chipmunk, fox, Mind you these are all wild animals. The eel river has already been designated a Wild River. There is every reason to return the both rivers to their natural flows, and the only reason not to is to continue to supply wealthy wine grape growers with free water at the expense of the Health of the entire Eel River.

  • Look up Van Ardsdale Dam (where the diversion tunnel is) on Google maps satellite. Then scroll the river down stream and see how long it takes to count 10,000 plants … then scroll back up and try to find any water tanks.

    • No shit, that’s messed up.

      • The Eel and it’s tribs are getting sucked dry by cannabis “farmers” … the state of the River is not much affected by the diversion. It is down stream from the dams that is the true prob

        • Bullshit

        • You have no idea what you are talking about, you make comments without scientific proof. More reefer madness

          • The release of water to the Eel during the summer is monitored and mandated that it needs to at minimum meet the natural flow. Says so all over the internet.

            So if it’s not the dam causing the low flow of the tribs and river … the only other variables are located down stream.

            • The misadventures of bunjee

              That “minimum” was based on flow data that started in the 50s, decades after the diversion was already built and was at a time when nearly zero people pulled water from it. The only people that could possibly know what the historic natural flows are have been dead for 50 years. So right there the data is suspect as the baseline began in an already altered state.

              • the HSU Photographic Library has 100s of amazing B&S stills of the river and what the bank looked like before the old growth was removed. it was a different river.

        • LET THE EEL FLOW

          Your wrong, the Headwaters of any stream is the most important part of the streams function, without good cold headwaters the entire stream is heated up and the entire river system has lowflow. Up to 80% of the headwaters of the Eel River is diverted, the water quality is impaired as it heats up and is contaminated by aquatic species and fuels from boaters, algal growth in the Lake Pillsbury floats downstream impacting water quality. The only license is for power generation, not for water theft, Sonoma County grapes get 80% of the stolen water, you can blame this diversion for the Eel River running dry every year…… time to decommision Van Arsdale and Lake Pillsbury and leave Eel River Water in the Eel River watershed and basin.

          • I do agree that the integrity of the Eel’s water is affected by the reservoir. Plus the dam blocks salmon and steelhead from spawning areas.

            But the dam does not lower the summer time flow of the Eel. If anything it increases it.

            The reason for the dewatering of tribs and the extreme low flows of the river in late summer are from people using too much water.

            Facts

  • PG&E can call the PVP an asset but the truth is that it’s a liability to them. That is why they want to get rid of it.

    Ideally, no one will bite and PG&E will remain the owner. The FERC relicensing should be denied. The entire project should be decommissioned and removed. PG&E should pay all costs.

  • Somebody recently posted that the dam forming Lake Mendocino could be added onto, raising lake Mendocino 36 feet and creating 70,000 acre feet of additional water storage.
    Coincidentally, 70,000 acre feet is about what we’ve been sending to the Russian river the last few years. The eel river dams could be removed and we could still send them some water in the winter time and they could store it in the newly enlarged Lake Mendocino.
    That would leave Potter Valley high and dry but no big deal, they could just build a bunch of ponds on their property. Or worse, we could hold them to the same standards as pot growers.

    And we need to get Estelle off the commission. Whatever she has recently said is a bunch of lies. If that commission gains control of the project she will sell us out. Guaranteed.

    • Oh the laughter!!!

      Send her back to Ireland. She is a carpet bagger of the worst stripe

    • Humboldt County Supervisor Estelle Fennell,who also Chairs the Eel/Russian River Commission, has been working with the Wiyot Tribe and other Humboldt County stake holders to show a strong united front in getting our Eel River water back. I am part of one of the groups she has been working with and we really appreciate her leadership at this crucial time.
      Fennell helped write Resolution 18-56
      …….Commissioner Fennel of Humboldt County read into the record the entirety of Resolution 18-56 from the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors which begins “Whereas, the County of Humboldt believes that decommissioning a full or partial removal of the Potter Valley Project is inevitable due to the aging infrastructure, low power production, and high cost of upgrading the facility to comply with current dam safety and environmental regulation….’

      Humboldt County’s Resolution 18-56 defines Humboldt County’s interest in the water saying, “The County of Humboldt will advocate strongly on behalf of the water users and natural resources within the County for water supply reliability, fish population that supports sustainable harvest opportunities, and full restoration of beneficial uses within the Eel River.” And, “The County of Humboldt will advocate for elimination of summer and fall water diversions and restoration of the Eel River’s natural flow regime to restore and enhance fisheries, water quality, water supply and recreational opportunities.”

      After reading this, Fennell invited Wyott Chairperson, Ted Hernandez, to read a tribal Resolution into the record stating the Wyott Tribe’s interest in being included in the Commission…….

      • Can you point to a source for this?

        • Well, he’s quoting what I wrote from my observations in the meeting. you can watch the entire proceeding on YouTube. its on the ‘Mendocino County’ channel. It’s three hours of your life, but you can see what everyone said, and get your own sense of what was happening.

          • Up in Washington state they removed some of the dams elwha and others and the salmon had remarkable come backs the near-shore Fisheries have improve dramatically the Scots damn is really old and more of a problem has no fish ladder and is the big thing for the natural flows the Van Arsdale Dam has a fish ladder and is not holding back as much water and can be used to supplement the water during the winter time to Porter Valley and helping with water storage on and around the Russian River the Scots damn also might have safety problems in the future passing the FERC might cost a lot of money to upgrade it to pass even the Van Arsdale Dam and the so called hole in the bucket could have some big issues New tubes were put in made of cedar and big Underground piping from a long time ago I don’t know how many upgrades they have made since it was built it does runs a long way to get to the pump house where the water turbines the last time I heard only one turbine was working it looks like a good system until something goes wrong it would be nice to see them both go away but maybe it could happen in stages giving time for more water storage to take care of The Vineyards and water for the water district and the people it takes care of

          • Elric of Melniboné

            Thanks, I found it.

      • Are you sure Fennel isn’t a wolf in sheep’s clothing? I hope you’re right but I don’t trust her.

    • Alas, most of the water in lake Mendo comes from… the diversion; that is, the Eel River.

    • How do you know this? And whom would you put on the commission?

    • Ooh dam, I agree wit u bout estelle

  • Nostradamus say big money wins fish and folks loose! Anybody want to bet on it?

  • It wasn’t solar grid ties to blamr, it’s because of legalization and the decrease in indoor operations.

    • DO WHAT IS RIGHT

      The power plant never produced enough power to amount to anything. It has been used for 75 years as a ruse to continue stealing water for Sonoma-Mendo County Grapes….. the entire fishing tourist industry along the Redwood Highway was destroyed as well as the Fisheries all along our North Coast as the Eel River wasa larger Fishery than the Klamath River or the COLUMBIA River….. destroyed for grapes…. time to do what is right and decommission those dams

  • Seems plausible to me that the stored water in the dam could be shared. Farming and fish on both sides need water.

  • so pge wants to dump the whole thing on the taxpayers and get money for it, too.

  • Brown Needs 2 Retire

    “Brown also said she feels Native Americans have plenty of power in the process as it stands. Twice Brown mentioned that the Tribes enjoy an elevated position in federal processes over local government.”……….. Wow, so Brown thinks that Mendo Pomo Tribes are the same tribes as Humboldt County tribes….. what an error in judgement, These are completely different Nations who traditionally have had entirely different governments with different goals and ideas, it is racist and naive on the part of Brown to deny Humboldt County tribes from the commision by claiming Mendo and Lake County Pomo are already representing tribal interests….. Supervisor/Commisioner Brown upholds the good old boy mentality and lack of empathy, compassion or understanding, Time for Brown to retire…..
    Free the Eel River, let the river be, stop the water theft to Sonoma Vineyards

  • I cant believe commisioner Brown is ignorant enough of tribal matters to think that Mendo Pomo represent the same interests as tribes North Along the Eel River…. Most Pomo live in Russian River watershed, Wylaki, Northern Pomo, Sherwood Pomo ,Yuki, Cahto, Wiyot all live in the Eel River Watershed, the Russian River tribes do not share the same interests as the Eel River tribes….. this commision needs to allow evwryone a seat at the table, not just the people interested in continueing this water theft and destruction of the Eel river for Mendo and Sonoma County wealthy wineries.

  • Brown Step Down

    This ia an exteemely misleading statement; “Sonoma County counts on the Potter Valley Project’s diversion from the Eel River to make water available in the Russian River for fish habitat after the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA) makes its withdrawals for urban users. SCWA serves regional suppliers, primarily in the Santa Rosa area, but including districts as far south as Marin County.”….. …. the truth is Sonoma County depends on the water stolen from the Eel River to continue to wine grape varietties which take extremely laege amounts of Eel River water…….. the water is literally stolen away through antiquated no lined ditches and lost to groundwater and evaporation…… the entire system is antiquated and is not safe or sound for either river, the swift and turbulent waters destroy the Salmon Habitat in the Russian River and the low flows and subsequent heating up of the Eel River kill salmonoids and prevents fish passage. The only morally acceptable choice is to tear down those dams and decommision the Potter Valley diversion. End of story. There is no permit for diversion, just foe power production, the entire system is a ruse to continue water theft bu Sonoma And Mendocino County. Commissioner Brown needs to step down, beside Commissioner Brown has a conflict of interest on the board.

  • EEL RIVER HISTORIAN

    ATTENTION KYM, THERE IS AN EMBEDDABLE LINK ON THE YOUTUBE CHANNEL FOR THIS MEETING!! IT WOULD LOOK GOOD AND FOSTER PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING FOR FOLKS TO SEE THE MEETING AND GET THE FEEL OF THE “PLAYERS”…. Everyone who wants to stay onformwd and know what is really going on should attend or watch the “Eel Russian River Commission” meetings or stay in the loop by watching the meeting on youtube, if we unite to return this water and stand up and get vocal wvwn a rally and sign waving we may be able to draw enough support for change to occur. Here is the latest meeting of the “Eel Russian River Commission” the meetings are live broadcast then saved on the Mendocino County Official Youtube page: Eel Russian River Commision 6/8/2018 https://youtu.be/lvtjBy1SS8s

  • Bulgiarian beef stew

    [edit]
    Its the peoples damm, they paid for it!
    Now they want to sell whats ours after stealing all of our waters for half a century. This is nust as bad as loser H selling our uranium to iran. [edit]

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