Wailaki Tribe Submits Resolution to Oppose the Great Redwood Trail

Press release from the White Lily Clan of the Wailaki:

wailaki tribe logoThe California Coastal Conservancy

Resolution To Oppose the Great Redwood Trail  

WHEREAS, the Wailaki Tribe, White Lily Clan of Wailaki, as a constituted and functioning government, has  determined that a significant portion of the Great Redwood Trail is proposed to be developed through culturally and ecologically sensitive Wailaki Ancestral Land that is of great historical and cultural significance to the Wailaki people.  

WHEREAS, The Great Redwood Trail poses a great threat to the Eel River Canyon Preserve, The Grand Canyon of the Eel River which has been designated as a National Wild and Scenic River, and an incalculable number of Native American, Sacred and Sensitive Sites; both documented and undocumented. Many of these sacred sites have already been desecrated by the general public, including irreplaceable ancient petroglyphs which are thousands of years old, which have documented impairment and degradation from recent and ongoing human vandalism.  

WHEREAS, the work of decommissioning the existing rail lines poses a direct and significant threat to the Natural Wild and Scenic nature of the Eel River. This threat results from the work that will be performed on the many miles of geologically unstable landscape that lies directly above the Eel River. This includes the failing infrastructure of rail lines, tunnels, bridges, and trestles.  

WHEREAS, the proposed project represents a significant, ongoing, long-term impairment to documented sensitive ecological and cultural resources. The feasibility of a successful, long-term maintenance and management program with the sufficient monetary and human resources necessary to monitor and mitigate the human impairment upon the landscape in perpetuity; is predictably unreasonable to expect. The proposed and expended resources will never adequately address the many miles of impairment that will be perpetually caused by a new and innumerable amount of human traffic in these sensitive areas.  

WHEREAS, the State of California has neglected to remediate land to the Wailaki people, in recognition of the past  loss of this land, and to restore valuable portions of this former asset, to a free and independent indigenous people  living in their ancestral land, but has instead, chosen the path of further conflict and hardship by drawing people  from all over the world, to once again trample over these First Peoples; their sacred lands and their sacred sites  without first consulting the Wailaki Tribe.  

BE IT RESOLVED, that these members of the Wailaki Tribe, White Lily Band of Wailaki, meeting on the 29th day of April, 2023, as a Duly Constitued Tribal Government do vigorously oppose all those parts of the proposed Great Redwood Trail that pass through Wailaki Ancestral Land and to cultivate and develop a coordinated partnership of opposition throughout all phases of project development, permitting, public comment and in all forms of media.  

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that these members of the Wailaki Tribe, White Lily Band of Wailaki seek a compatible and peaceful government to government relationship with the people of the State of California and their representatives. We seek a relationship that exists in mutual respect, dignity, and good faith work toward a future filled with a benefit for all people. It is acknowledged that we share the stewardship and protection of these great natural resources and are willing to embrace your respectful and good faith partnership in conservation and protection of them.  

Respectfully,  

[Dorothy Hoaglin, Chairperson 

Markida Slaughter, Secretary]

 

Cc  

The Great Redwood Trail Agency 

The California Coastal Conservancy 

Senator Mike McGuire  

Governor Gavin Newsom 

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32 Comments
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Canyon oak
Guest
Canyon oak
5 months ago

Lol,
Take that McGuire!
Turns out the special people don’t like your bum/Quad/robbery trail idea!
It IS hard to justify road/trail maintenance considering landslide issues when the railroad already flopped due to these conditions.
With racially exclusive identities like tribes , it’s always about political leverage or nation building, and they obviously have clear case here, to oppose white mans recreation.
I’m just surprised I haven’t heard anything about it till now!
This is a good posture and strategy for the upcoming native led PR campaign to remove the eel river dams and diversion.
The Trail really is hard to justify, considering environmental and economic concerns..

Two Dogs
Guest
Two Dogs
5 months ago
Reply to  Canyon oak

As well as social concerns. Does the trail cut across reservation land anywhere?

rlpittsjr
Member
rlpittsjr
5 months ago
Reply to  Two Dogs

Not a defined Reservation, but through the ancestral territory of the Wailaki People where there are landmarks, burial sites, sacred sites that belong only to the knowledge of the Wailaki and no one else as to ensure they are not desecrated further. Just as they describe in their proclamation.

Two Dogs
Guest
Two Dogs
5 months ago
Reply to  rlpittsjr

It’s not really their call. The govt. has a registry of many sights, and is updating all the time. If the Indians are going to use certain claims to influence control of an area; they must prove them. Once proven, they become political levers to be coveted by many.

Mr. Clark
Member
Mr. Clark
5 months ago
Reply to  rlpittsjr

it worked for the G/O road……

ForestGrump
Member
ForestGrump
5 months ago
Reply to  Canyon oak

The tribe that slaughtered the Wilcutt tribe as it made its way back from the Round Valley incarceration trying to return to their homelands in N. Humboldt.

Dave Kirby
Guest
Dave Kirby
5 months ago
Reply to  Canyon oak

I had the chance to take one of the last excursion trains from Willits to Eureka. We did 15 miles an hour and you had to hold on to the seat backs to stay upright I will say that the river there was a whole different critter as water rushed over bed rock. My main concern is this endeavor does not take into account the time and treasure it will take to complete a formidable task of questionable benefit.

Espino
Guest
Espino
5 months ago

Right, just like they claimed in Little Valley. Well, until they teamed up with the Mexicans for the big bucks. Pffft

thetallone
Guest
thetallone
5 months ago

Thank you, Wailaki’s, for raising this issue.

Martin
Guest
Martin
5 months ago

As far as Iam concerned I don’t mind any of our local tribes either in the county or out. But,when they start saying everything is ancestral land my blood pressure goes up. I really doubt that the own every single piece of ground in the county. They were not here during the caveman days, so in reality the land belongs to the caveman. The Great Redwood Trail should move ahead without more talking, just doing!

Sawanobori
Guest
Sawanobori
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin

So what is your best guess as to when the indigenous peoples arrived? 1000, 3000, 5000, 8000, 10000, 14000 years ago come on share your anthropology wisdom. Nice you don’t mind living in Indian Country.

Martin
Guest
Martin
5 months ago
Reply to  Sawanobori

If I was here, then I could give you an answer. No, I don’t mind living in Indian Country at all and have several good friends who are Indian. I love to hunt and fish with them. They don’t mind the Great Redwood Trail at all and have indicated to me that the land should be used for everyone to enjoy!

Sawanobori
Guest
Sawanobori
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin

Your caveman assertion and unwillingness to accept the millenniums of habitation should embarrass your fourth grade teacher.

You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
Guest
You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
5 months ago
Reply to  Sawanobori

A human footprint preserved in the mud near White Sands New Mexico was recently dated at 23,000 years old or so.

Tnuc
Guest
Tnuc
1 month ago

30000years ago the coast was 150 miles inland

Awaiting Approval
Guest
Awaiting Approval
5 months ago
Reply to  Sawanobori

Don’t mind at all. The so called “native americans” lost and I hold title to the land I own. No matter when the so called “native americans” arrived, anthropologists are finding significant evidence that there were ALREADY people here that THEY displaced. The colonists got colonized. Big deal, been going on around the planet for eons. Ask the Palestinians.

Sawanobori
Guest
Sawanobori
5 months ago

I am interested in your claim of early displacement of indigenous populations. Please list the anthropology publications you reference or admit you sort of made that up.

Ed Voice
Guest
Ed Voice
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin

The word “own” was not used in this press release, this was a word you used, not the Wailaki Tribe, White Lily Clan. Maybe you should watch the new documentary by Ken Burns called American Buffalo, so you can lean how long native people have lived everywhere before anyone else. In Northern California is more than 19,000 years.

https://www.pbs.org/video/american-buffalo-episode-1-blood-memory/

Lone Ranger
Guest
Lone Ranger
5 months ago

The swahealy clan objects to this trail also. No ties to the land but just objects.

Sawanobori
Guest
Sawanobori
5 months ago
Reply to  Lone Ranger

You are the self proclaimed spokesperson for the Crack Moiety of the Swahealy Clan … LOL

Dinky
Guest
Dinky
5 months ago

The Eel River Canyon has already rejected mankind’s intrusion and industry. It didn’t take long for the land to reject the tracks. The remains are hauntingly beautiful, and the message pretty clear. Hike the area respectfully and primitively, those who are drawn to it. Otherwise we should let it rest, and let it be wild. It clearly can’t be tamed with tracks or trails.

Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
5 months ago
Reply to  Dinky

Hi Dink
You and I both know people who know where there are many rocks with native carvings on them, and where many other native artifacts can be found. The ones that I know about I don’t share with anybody, because I have seen them be destroyed by people that thought they could chip them loose and take them. It never works.

I think that the Wailaki are most concerned about those sorts of things.

The railroad down the Eel canyon is a lot like the slide at Confusion Hill. The state had to haul away all the loose rock and debris when it fell in the roadway. It became too expensive to keep the road clear, because they couldn’t blade it into the river. Now Confusion Hill is bypassed and the mud slides right into the river. Same as the Eel Canyon. All of the historic slides go right into the river.

thetallone
Guest
thetallone
5 months ago

I think that the Wailaki are most concerned about those sorts of things.
That’s only one of the things they are concerned about-they are clear in this document that they recognize the inherent geological instability of the canyon. Kind of a big deal.

Ed Voice
Guest
Ed Voice
5 months ago

Ernie, the slide at Confusion Hill was nothing like the Eel River canyon railroad, it is still littered with train cars and tracks along the shoreline and in the river. Watch video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=RhCjYNKXNvk

Tnuc
Guest
Tnuc
1 month ago
Reply to  Dinky

RIGHT ON!!!!

Crikey!
Guest
Crikey!
5 months ago

lol

NO REDWOOD TRAIL
Guest
NO REDWOOD TRAIL
5 months ago

IN stand with the Wailaki Tribe in opposition to this bad idea

Martin
Guest
Martin
5 months ago

I respect your stance on opposing this idea.

You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
Guest
You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
5 months ago

Offer an example of a good idea.

c u 2morrowD
Member
5 months ago

Come on man ! ya gotta learn to share if want us to care.

You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
Guest
You can't make anyone happy. All of the time.
5 months ago

The best way for future generations to understand the past, is keep them away. We will gain greater understanding of nature, our geography, and history, if we keep to the designated pavement, stay in our cars, and watch Disney movies. The fact that a train route through there for 80 years or so was a bad idea, means it should be cordoned off from future generations. The best way to work cooperatively is to uncompromisingly oppose any and all action. To imply that today’s beings might enjoy visiting the same ancestral space, implies past people might have enjoyed themselves with light hearted fun, and belies the fact that up until 200 years ago, creating petroglyphs was super serious, and appreciated by ALL members of society no matter what. I declare this judgement infallible by virtue of the unassailable projections of past virtue! You are welcome. İf you are a Euro American you may signal your support by wearing an edgy beret, and murmuring “ho-Hó” in agreement.

andrew
Guest
andrew
6 days ago

hacked againa