Fortuna Middle School Celebrates Elizabeth Stevens’ Remarkable Achievement at California Science and Engineering State Fair

This is a press release from Fortuna Middle School:

Elizabeth Stephens, 8th grader at Fortuna Middle School, won 2nd Place at the State Science Fair

Elizabeth Stevens (or Liz, as she prefers to be called), a talented eighth-grade student from Fortuna Middle School, has earned second place at this year’s prestigious California Science and Engineering State Fair (CSEF). This remarkable achievement also earned her a nomination to the esteemed Thermo-Fisher Scientific Junior Innovators Challenge (JIC).

For the statewide competition, after she submitted her project online, Liz was scheduled for a two-hour Zoom interview with ten different judges at 10-minute intervals.

Liz’s project stood out among numerous entries. Because of her outstanding performance, she is now among the elite young scientists who will compete for a place in the Top 300, an honor that includes a cash award and further recognition of her talents. The Top 300 will be announced on September 4.

Liz’s journey does not stop here. Should she advance beyond the Top 300, she will be one of 30 finalists invited to participate in an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. This prestigious gathering, scheduled for later this year, will allow finalists to showcase their research , engage in advanced scientific and engineering activities, and compete for additional prizes , including the $25,000 Thermo-Fisher Scientific ASCEND Award.

Liz’s success brings great pride to Fortuna Middle School and serves as an inspiration to her peers and the community. It is also noteworthy to mention that a sixth grader from Hydesville took home the first-place prize at the same competition, highlighting the exceptional young talent in our region.

We invite the community and media to join us in supporting Liz as she prepares for the next stages of the competition. For more details about the California Science and Engineering State Fair, please visit https://csef.usc.edu/.

Previously:

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9 Comments
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Mega me
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Mega me
2 months ago

Congratulations to Liz but why is the first prize winner glossed over and not even recognized by name?

Yabut
Guest
Yabut
2 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

I think because her status as second place in the State Science Fair was not the point of the press release. It was being eligible for the Thermo-Fisher Scientific Junior Innovators Challenge. The press release might have been a little more explanatory.

D'Tucker Jebs
Member
2 months ago

I wish the press release contained more information about her project.
Looks interesting.

NoBody
Guest
NoBody
2 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

… or anything.

Pharmstheproblem
Member
Pharmstheproblem
2 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

Right, who, what, where, when, and how is never answered nowadays. And not just on here.

Last edited 2 months ago
I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
2 months ago

Nice, but you seem to think her entry unworthy of description

Country Joe
Member
2 months ago

Congratulations Elizabeth. That’s a wonderful achievement. Science is the future.

farfromputin
Member
farfromputin
2 months ago

Good job, Liz. You are prepared for our wonderful and exciting world.

Steve Koch
Guest
Steve Koch
2 months ago

From California Science Fair website:

“10-20 Bursting Bubble Ice
J-10-20 – Bursting Bubble Ice
By:
Elizabeth Stevens
Earth & Environment: Air/Water (Junior Division)

Abstract
From my research I learned that glacier ice melts faster than regular ice. A recent study suggests that glacier ice melts faster because it has pressurized bubbles trapped in the ice. When the ice melts, the bubbles pop out and make turbulence in the water, and make the glacier ice melt faster than the regular ice. I conducted three experiments to study this. The first was putting glacier and regular ice in salt water, and weighing them over time. The second experiment I had no water and just let the glacier and the regular ice melt in the air. My final experiment tested the stratification of salt water and the fresh meltwater, in which I had the glacier and regular ice in separate containers. My experiments showed that glacier ice indeed melts faster in water, but not air. This result supports my hypothesis that if glacier ice melts faster because of the turbulence, then I will see that in water but not air. My last experiment showed less stratification of glacier meltwater, also supporting the idea of extra turbulence.”