Southern Humboldt Nonprofit Receives $3.5 Million State Grant to Aid Homeless

SHO SoHum Housing Opportunities Logo

A local charity, SoHum Housing Opportunities (SHO), has received a large grant from the state to tackle homelessness in the area. This group, dedicated to offering homes for the homeless, will now be able to continue providing housing services thanks to a recent funding of three and a half million dollars.

After the Garberville Veterans Hall shut down in 2015, Southern Humboldt lacked emergency shelters, leaving many vulnerable people without protection, particularly during bad weather. But in 2018, the community’s collective efforts led to the creation of SHO, starting a focused effort to deal with homelessness in the region.

Patte Rae, SHO board president and housing advocate, expressed her excitement at the newfound financial support. The $3.5 million grant, part of the Encampment Resolution Funding Program, is a result of the state’s commitment to aiding local jurisdictions in safeguarding the well-being of the homeless population and facilitating their transition into stable housing.

“This funding provides our community with transitional emergency housing to the tune of $3.5 million for a three-year project that will assist our homeless to permanent housing. Isn’t that great?” exclaimed Rae. The grant encompasses various initiatives, including property acquisition, outreach programs, rapid rehousing services, and oversight of shelter facilities. The overarching goal is to facilitate a shift from survival mode to a state of consistent safety, nourishment, and shelter, ultimately leading to permanent housing solutions.

SHO’s strategic plan for the next three years is multifaceted, aiming to expand services, establish a safe camp Resource Center, and implement a transitional housing program. Recognizing the diverse needs of the homeless population, the organization seeks to provide options that accommodate varying preferences and circumstances, addressing known barriers to sheltering houseless individuals.

One pivotal aspect of SHO’s plan is the construction of a Tiny House village, in alignment with Humboldt County’s housing goals. This village will offer independent living units equipped with essential amenities, fostering a sense of community while ensuring individual autonomy.

The County Planning Commission’s recent deliberations on draft ordinances signal progress towards removing zoning barriers, a crucial step in realizing SHO’s vision. However, the organization’s ambitions extend beyond physical infrastructure. With a focus on transitional housing, SHO aims to support residents in transitioning to permanent, affordable housing solutions. This initiative includes rent assistance, job opportunities, and community support networks, emphasizing a holistic approach to homelessness.

Diana Copithorne, a board member of SHO, emphasized the broader impact of these endeavors, envisioning the benefits to the community as a whole. “The ripple effect will be improving the quality of life for everyone,” Copithorne asserted, highlighting the potential for long-term community change.

With a deadline looming for fund expenditure by June 2025, SHO is laying the groundwork for swift implementation. The organization has identified a suitable property and aims to initiate the escrow process soon, with a commitment to prioritizing shelter during the upcoming winter months.

Inclusive community engagement remains central to SHO’s principles, with ongoing efforts to involve the homeless population in decision-making processes. As Rae affirmed, “They have to be a part of all this. We’ve been building bridges.”

Despite some skepticism within the community, SHO plans to empower, rather than enable, the homeless population. Recognizing the profound challenges faced by individuals transitioning from homelessness, the organization emphasizes the importance of providing support and pathways to self-sufficiency.

As SHO prepares to engage with the community at upcoming events, including tabling at local gatherings, they extend an open invitation to all interested folks to join them in their endeavor. Together, with collaborative efforts from community members, county representatives, and state support, SHO is excited to continue on to the next steps towards addressing homelessness in Southern Humboldt.

For more information on Southern Humboldt Housing Opportunities and their projects, visit sohumhousing.org as updates on this transformative project continue to unfold.

Note: Hat tip to KMUD News Director, Lauren Schmitt, for her collaboration on this article.

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Tweety Bird
Guest
Tweety Bird
25 days ago

Sounds awesome but I didn’t see anything mentioning assisting these folks with the myriad mental health issues that our local homeless population has. Housing first is essential, but that’s not the end. Many need meds they can’t afford and then, they won’t take them, many refuse to change their ways, love living “free”…stringing ladders across intersections and wearing shrubs on their heads…not indications of a healthy individual capable of change. We have quite a few here in SoHum that seem to be broken beyond helping. Best wishes for success…

Truth Be Told
Member
Truth Be Told
25 days ago
Reply to  Tweety Bird

Another program designed to fail.

We don’t have a homelessness problem.

We have an untreated mental health and untreated drug addiction and alcohol dependency problem.

Unless and until these underlying issues are addressed the State is just throwing money into the wind.

Last edited 25 days ago
furies
Guest
furies
24 days ago
Reply to  Truth Be Told

no we have a ‘using housing as a commodity’ problem

and a very very bad GREED problem

Heart
Guest
Heart
24 days ago
Reply to  furies

All seems to lead to a greedy world banker problem….. creating $ out of thin air, normalizing inflation, fund brainwashing through the schools etc
Anyone familiar with the “Fractional reserve system ” ?

Thatguyinarcata
Guest
Thatguyinarcata
24 days ago
Reply to  Truth Be Told

The tiny house village that the Betty Chinn foundation established in eureka on this same premise seems to have been one of the more successful efforts in combating homelessness up.here

Salmongirl
Guest
Salmongirl
23 days ago
Reply to  Truth Be Told

In Los Angeles 35% of the homeless are highly functional and have jobs. They can’t come up with the money to pay first and last month, cleaning deposits etc to get into housing with astronomical rents.
This is a multifaceted problem. I know people who have jobs that have had to live out of their cars. That is a very stressful thing to do.

Canyon oak
Guest
Canyon oak
25 days ago

i sometimes wonder what percentage of the population of any community is actually currently employed at any given time?
seems pretty low in most towns, like maybe 25% of people work.
just a guess
amazing society is still going when so many people don’t have to do much towards the collective effort.
Maybe this project is a good effort towards intimidating homelessness once and for all.
the spoof is in the pudding

Giant Squirrel
Guest
Giant Squirrel
25 days ago

State already spent $24 billion on the homeless and the problem is worse than ever so why stop now?

Gary Whittaker
Guest
Gary Whittaker
25 days ago

I’d like to know how much of that money is for administrative costs.

zerene_83
Guest
zerene_83
3 days ago
Reply to  Gary Whittaker

It’s capped at 7% per the funding restrictions. https://bcsh.ca.gov/calich/erf_program.html

Espino
Guest
Espino
25 days ago

“as updates on this transformative project continue to unfold.”

Oh please, the only thing that will transform is the balance in a handful of people’s bank accounts.

Unvaxxed and overtaxed
Guest
Unvaxxed and overtaxed
25 days ago

“ California fails to track its homelessness spending or results, a new audit says”

https://calmatters.org/housing/homelessness/2024/04/california-homelessness-spending/

More taxation without representation

Last edited 25 days ago
Farce
Guest
Farce
25 days ago

I’d like to see some people get help. Perhaps it’s time to distinguish the homeless that can be helped out from those that don’t want to give up their drugs and alcohol. Help those we can who fell through the cracks, didn’t have family to fall back on, had a bad run of luck or medical issues, maybe went on a bender for a few months but came back, have a small mental or emotional problem that can be mitigated….There are some who are homeless who can be helped and will respond and get functional and be grateful for the chance. The rest will suck up all the resources and show zero improvement until they are forced into rehab or mental institutions….

Zipline
Guest
Zipline
24 days ago
Reply to  Farce

Betty Chin does an excellent job of helping the homeless/jobless. She has high standards though. No drugs. She’ll house you (and family) and get you a job. She only helps a very small percentage because only a very small percentage want help.

Yabut
Guest
Yabut
24 days ago
Reply to  Farce

Homeless Triage… sounds like a usefully idea but antithetical to the nature of those who formed such groups.
It’s the unusual group that can rise above the paradigm of not judging , which is always successful because it actually has no criteria for judging failure. Maybe this group will if the people in it are practical.
BTW there are two group that are very good candidates for helping. One is the few who od’d and scared themselves enough to be willing to do the difficult work of change and second are the people who have aged enough to notice they are unlikely to survive their current way of life much longer, usually around age 50, and are able to rein in their impulsiveness enough to cooperate.

Kym Kemp
Admin
24 days ago
Reply to  Yabut

Just to forestall any concerns, your comments are being held because you misspelled your email address again.

Yabut
Guest
Yabut
24 days ago
Reply to  Kym Kemp

Was never the point with me. For you apparently it is. But to save you time, I figured out why the first letter of the email address was being cut out.

Last edited 24 days ago
Kym Kemp
Admin
24 days ago
Reply to  Yabut

I’m unsure what you are saying. I’m just trying to make sure you didn’t think you were put on moderation. I don’t know why you are suddenly having issues with your email address but it is causing my software to hold your comments.

Is this even legal 😳
Guest
Is this even legal 😳
24 days ago

Where would the tiny house village be located ? Seems as though that would just be an incentive for more homeless persons to make So Hum their chosen new home , just dandy !

I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
24 days ago

Meanwhile, WHERE IS THE VETERANS HALL.
HEY SUPERVISORS !!!

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
24 days ago

More taxpayer money to perpetuate an untenable situation.

Clank
Guest
Clank
24 days ago

Election season fodder.

I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
24 days ago

This seems true to me

FB_IMG_1714065821373
Yabut
Guest
Yabut
24 days ago
Reply to  I am a robot

True but not a good quote for this article. The gist of the the part that comes before this bit is that there are choices the poor make that appear to those richer to be foolish but in fact are a choice made of necessity. The quote follows the example of the room occupied by these particular poor are stuffy and noxious when the rich know that good ventilation improves health. But the rich fail to take into account that a well ventilated room is also colder. The poor do not have the resources to choose to be warm and have good ventilation so choose warm over ventilation.
The stories are in essence a criticism of those who “know” what poor people need. Not of poverty itself. Which is exactly the goal of this grant- knowing what poor people need.
https://storyoftheweek.loa.org/2020/11/poor-mans-pudding-and-rich-mans-crumbs.html

Jimmy Durchslag
Guest
Jimmy Durchslag
24 days ago

As the grant writer for the project, I am extremely gratified by the successful result. It took a lot of people working together to make it happen. I wanted to point out that the deadline for expenditure is the end of June 2027, not June 2025. The administrative costs are very minimal, less than 10% of the total. A large budget item is a pool of funds to provide rental assistance to low income participants for permanent housing,

Zipline
Guest
Zipline
24 days ago

Who’s going to rent to them? A trashed rental is what the capitalist ends up with.

I like stars
Guest
I like stars
24 days ago

Is $350,000 a very minimal amount of money?

Zipline
Guest
Zipline
24 days ago

Let’s throw yet more money after the billions already spent with nothing to show for it trying the same shit everyone else has tried to no effect. This money will change nothing.

Permanently on Monitoring
Guest
Permanently on Monitoring
24 days ago

Well, Garberville certainly needs a new future, a new economic base, and new boards and NPO’s to score grants…

And centralizing the homeless in Garberville is a great idea, since there are numerous support mechanisms in Garberville, and since Garberville is so generally accepting of outsiders, druggie losers and crooked hospital administrators…

A big place for the houseless, right there in Goobsterdam: What a great idea!

$3.5 million should be able to house, hell, at least 5 guys!

Good luck, and I hope more grants come in before winter!

J,B
Guest
J,B
24 days ago

Amazing some of the same people complaining about funding Ukraine and Israel because we have homeless people that should be helped first, are still complaining when we get some much needed funding in southern Humboldt! Im starting to think there is a group of people on here who are only satisfied by whining and being the constant victims of the deep state and local non profits laundering their tax dollars! Will it solve the problem, no. Will it likely truly help some people? I bet it will.

Yabut
Guest
Yabut
24 days ago
Reply to  J,B

I think that the issue is the taking of more and more money while the problems the money is supposed to address keeps getting worse and worse. It seems there is no accountability for it in the end. Just more of the same. Not that this particular NGO is the problem.
And which is actually the group of people “who are only satisfied by whining and being the constant victims ?”

J,B
Guest
J,B
24 days ago
Reply to  Yabut

Really? Haven’t you ever noticed commenters who , almost without fail on every topic take the line that they are somehow the victims in some way, and the experts on everything! lol. Maybe you don’t?

West Benbow
Guest
West Benbow
24 days ago
Reply to  J,B

Dude he’s talking about you. (facepalm) Pot, meet kettle

Kicking Bull
Guest
Kicking Bull
24 days ago

Feed the hungry, quench the thirsty, house the homeless, clothe the nude.

Whether capitalism can heal the wounds of capitalism is an open question, still these humans have the right idea.

Last edited 24 days ago
Libertybiberty
Guest
Libertybiberty
24 days ago

Fixing the border would help

Marcia
Guest
Marcia
24 days ago

Congratulations to Patte Rae and SHO on receiving this grant! They know what they are doing, and I’m confident they will put this money to good use and continue to help people in our community.

toothless in seattle
Guest
toothless in seattle
24 days ago
Reply to  Marcia

The new homeless shelter will be the old grange hall, north end of locust st. I’m sure the fire district members and the best western motel with the local neighbors wont complain as we have gotten used to the drug house across the street ran by redwoods rural.
More needles, more trash, more loitering, more theft, more dope selling
We’ll fight it to the end
Not gonna happen
Try a nice Redway location

The Real Guest
Guest
The Real Guest
23 days ago

The old Grange Hall is on (North?) Fir Lane not Locust nor North Locust…

The north end of locust street is the cemetery.

Access is off Locust between the firehouse and the old Sheriff Substation, possibly also accessible between the Humboldt House Inn, and old Sicilitos/new Mexican Restaurant/Tsunami Surf and Sport…

Tap screenshot to enlarge…

Screenshot_20240426-140448
Last edited 23 days ago
Salmongirl
Guest
Salmongirl
23 days ago

It should be a priority to get the mentally ill off the streets into stable housing

Guest
Guest
Guest
23 days ago
Reply to  Salmongirl

I disagree. They should get the working poor off the street first & the mentally ill next. Otherwise, the cycle never ends. I know working people that can barely pay rent + food + other expenses. They are literally on the brink of becoming homeless & yet they both have, low wages, jobs.