Providence Celebrates National Doctors’ Day

Press release from Providence:

couple in front of christmas tree

Dr. Ellen Mahoney and Dr. Luther Cobb

It may not be as popular or romantic as Valentine’s Day, or as festive and celebratory as St. Patrick’s Day or Memorial Day, but National Doctors’ Day in the world of health care is just as important. The annual recognition focuses on the special skills of physicians and their unrelenting commitment to keeping their communities healthy.

At Providence in Humboldt County, the celebration has become a family affair for some doctors. That’s because the medical staff at Providence St. Joseph Hospital and Providence Redwood Memorial Hospital have several physicians who are married to other doctors.

According to a recent online article on the American Hospital Association website, approximately 20% of doctor’s spouses are physicians, a percentage that is comparable in Humboldt. It makes sense when considering the ages of those in medical school often coincides with the time when individuals are searching for a life partner. In addition, doctor’s lives are incredibly busy and many find it hard to meet someone outside of the medical community. Having that shared background and professional passion, often leads to romance. Once married, it also leads to incredibly dynamic family schedules.

couple in front of the beach

Dr. Join Luh and Dr. Madeleine Ramos

“Our lives can be crazy at times! Our family of five has a lot of schedules to juggle,” said Madeleine Ramos, M.D. an allergy and immunology doctor with the Providence Medical Group who is married to Join Luh, M.D., a radiation oncologist who treats cancer patients at The Russel Pardoe Radiation Oncology Center at St. Joseph Hospital.

“It’s busy! It’s interesting how we learn from each other because we’re in different specialties,” echoed Dr. Luh.

That sentiment mirrors the experiences of many physician couples who face the challenge of balancing demanding professional lives with the responsibilities of raising a family. The unique dynamics of a physician couple in a rural community often bring a deeper sense of purpose and connection to their work.

Ellen Mahoney, M.D., medical director of the St. Joseph Hospital Cancer Program, shares “when the children were at home, it was mainly chaotic! I frequently thought of the entertainers who keep plates rotating on the top of long poles in terms of living in the present.”

Despite the frenetic nature of a two-physician household, there are benefits.

“One advantage to having two of us is understanding the feelings and pressures that make us want to stay at the hospital longer because of some situation,” said Mahoney, who is married to surgeon, Luther Cobb, M.D. “It can be explained to the other in shorthand. Since we each have compelling patient care situations, we understand the feelings involved and can support one another.”

The impact of these physician couples in Humboldt County extends beyond their individual roles.

two people in scrubs and masks

Dr. Ellen Mahoney and Dr. Luther Cobb

“Being a physician couple in a rural community means our family has double the impact on physician accessibility,” said Dr. Luh.

It also helps with recruitment efforts, explained Dr. Mahoney. “It is fortuitous to interview a candidate only to find they are in a committed relationship with someone in another specialty we need.”

The serendipity of such encounters further strengthens the medical community and helps foster a sense of camaraderie among physicians, many of whom find it difficult to imagine working anywhere else.

“Our rural community is a wonderful and meaningful place to work and to raise our family,” exclaimed Dr. Ramos.

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Erik BurmanD
Member
Erik Burman
15 days ago

Yeah. Fuck Providence. They use physicians up like toilet paper.

Yabut
Guest
Yabut
15 days ago
Reply to  Erik Burman

Do they? Is there any place that doesn’t? Some of it is self imposed by physician organizations like the AMA, or the various medical schools in places like South Korea or Europe when they decided years ago to limit the training of new doctors. They all seem to have seriously underestimated the future need in the effort not to flood the medical field and thereby reduce income. They upped enrollment about 10 years ago but they are still not gaining. South Korea just had a physician strike to keep medical schools there from expanding.
But otherwise “Evidence shows that burnout affects more than half of practising physicians in the USA and is rising. The 2018 Survey of America’s Physicians Practice Patterns and Perspectives reported that 78% of physicians had burnout, an increase of 4% since 2016. Furthermore, 80% of doctors in a British Medical Association 2019 survey were at high or very high risk of burnout, with junior doctors most at risk, followed by general practitioner partners. Increasingly, physician burnout has been recognised as a public health crisis in many high-income countries because it not only affects physicians’ personal lives and work satisfaction but also creates severe pressure on the whole health-care system—particularly threatening patients’ care and safety.”
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)31573-9/fulltext
https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2024-02-27/why-thousands-of-junior-doctors-in-south-korea-are-striking-and-what-it-means-for-patients

I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
14 days ago
Reply to  Yabut

This is not Korea

MostRespectedProfessionD
Member
MostRespectedProfession
14 days ago
Reply to  Erik Burman

Your choice of words is unbecoming and unprofessional coming from a physician such as yourself. I have been a patient of and have met numerous physicians who have worked at St. Joe’s for over 30 years, so your 3rd sentence does not prove to be true. We are blessed to have so many doctors who are dedicated to serving in our rural community.

spamned
Guest
spamned
14 days ago

He can say whatever he wants…and as someone who has retired from ‘health care’…he’s not wrong.
PE has taken over and $$$$ rule over lives.
We’re all funding units now…

AkbarD
Member
15 days ago

Huge thanks to rural doctors!

tru matters
Guest
tru matters
15 days ago

I’ve had nothing but good experiences with the doctors and staff at St. Joseph.

I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
14 days ago

Pretty amusing for a region that has so few doctors. I have not had my own doctor fo 6 or 7 years.