Cooperative Agriculture Network Develops Solutions for Local Cannabis Economy

The Cooperative Agriculture Network (CAN)Press release from the Cooperative Agriculture Network:

The Cooperative Agriculture Network (CAN), is a worker-owned cooperative that supports and unites independent craft cannabis farmers, distributors, regulators, and industry advocates in the Emerald Triangle. They are working together to protect our region from the economic, cultural, and environmental damage of large-scale industrial cannabis consolidation.

With funding from the Land-Sea Connection program of Resources Legacy Fund made possible by the Keith Campbell Foundation for the Environment, CAN is offering their third annual no-cost Cooperative Cannabis Academy this Spring.

Starting with an in-person preview on February 27th from 4-6 p.m. at the Crisp Lounge in Eureka, the worker-owners from the CAN cooperative will preview their 5-week online Academy with snacks, good company, and inspiration for a cooperative cannabis future. All are welcome.

The 5-week no-cost CAN Academy launches online March 12th with guest speaker George Siemens, Founder/CEO of Organic Valley Cooperative. Siemens pioneered the formation of the organically grown, farmer-owned milk industry that has become a staple of the American diet. Register for the Academy at cancoop.org.

The CAN Academy includes training in the formation of farm cooperatives like Salmon Creek Legacy Farms, which was born from the CAN Academy, and lessons in cooperative processes that everyone can use to leverage shared-power while respecting independence and autonomy. Structured cooperative projects like farm cooperatives and distribution cooperatives unite small, independent businesses to share resources, reduce overhead, and increase market presence. Cooperative meeting facilitation, decision-making, and problem-solving are skills anyone can use to achieve individual goals like effective operations and collaboration, and to achieve shared goals like appellation and regulatory reform.

During the Academy, CAN is bringing in guest speaker Michael Polson, Director of the Berkeley Cannabis Research Center, and other local and national industry leaders and cooperative developers.

CAN serves to develop and implement cooperative, community-driven solutions that promote multigenerational land stewardship and the prosperity of our rural communities. Learn more at cancoop.org.

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B Honest
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B Honest
2 months ago

Co-op’s are the future for Humboldt cultivators.

10 farms staying independent yet coming together to finish the end product.

Here is how I am setting one up,
hypothetically. Nothing is set in stone.

10 farmers pay into the co-op.
The rate is determined by the farmers (100 Lbs per year) would equal 1,000 lbs.

At minimum $250 lb that is a $250,000 a year investment.

We partner with someone who will invest $1,000,000 and purchase a building out right. Banks don’t loan to cannabis companies.

We apply for a micro business license.
Now these 10 farms are vertical and share a business with the investors.
Raw material can now be packaged and marketed as a brand instead of selling bulk flower.

I strongly support and encourage as many farms as possible to look into what CAN has to offer.

Small co-op’s is how Humboldt can compete against those vertical monopolies set up south of us.

Good luck farmers

Permanently on Monitoring
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Permanently on Monitoring
1 month ago
Reply to  B Honest

I believe I suggested this 7 years ago…

Felix the bowhunter.
Guest
Felix the bowhunter.
1 month ago

Sounds like they’re flogging a dead horse. The weed game is over . Most growers shoved off and went back to LA . Real farmers in the central valley are happy to make 100 bucks a pound, it beats 50 cents a pound for their tomatoes. Gone are the days of easy money. Time to go rejoin the real world and get a regular job.

Thatguyinarcata
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Thatguyinarcata
1 month ago

Central valley growers are not making $100/lb. Cannabis hasn’t really taken off in the central valley. The primary production areas outside of the triangle are the shuttered cut flower glass houses of the Salinas Valley and the foothills of Santa Barbara. In SB cannabis is less profitable than well run berry operations.

Yep …Humboldt.
Guest
Yep …Humboldt.
1 month ago

Farming is a regular job… no matter what your crop is. Legal weed is farming like any other crop. And with many agricultural product , cooperatives are a great way to help limit your overhead, share knowledge and gain bargaining powers which buyers. This is a great initiative to help complete the transition to weed being a fully integrated crop in California ag.

Wild west
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Wild west
1 month ago

Is that $100 profit after paying to grow and trim it? After the government fees for a license?