[UPDATE 12:15 p.m.] Chains Required on Some Highways, Rain and Wind Expected Today

Hayfork Divide Alert California image

Snow in the mountains Trinity County. [Image from Hayfork Divide Alert California camera]

As the world focuses on Southern California bracing for the impact of a major storm, Northwestern California is already experiencing adverse weather conditions that are significantly affecting travel on some major roads.

Heavy snowfall is anticipated in the mountainous areas of Trinity, Shasta, Siskiyou and the eastern parts of Lake and Mendocino counties. Lighter snowfall is expected in the mountains of eastern Humboldt County. Some highways are already requiring chains (see below.) This could impact travel significantly in mountain areas.

Southern Humboldt County’s interior is also facing challenging weather conditions, with forecasts predicting a mix of rain and snow in the morning, transitioning to rain showers and snow showers in the afternoon. The snow level is expected to rise from 2500 feet in the morning to 4000 feet by the afternoon, with snow accumulations of 4 to 5 inches anticipated. Additionally, expect windy conditions.

In Northern Humboldt’s interior, the situation is somewhat similar, with a chance of rain and snow in the morning giving way to rain showers and snow showers in the afternoon. The area is also expected to experience windy conditions, with snow levels rising from 2000 feet in the morning to 3500 feet by the afternoon and accumulations of 3 to 4 inches.

Rain or showers should fall throughout the rest of northwestern California.

The National Weather Service in Eureka has issued a Flood Watch for portions of Mendocino and Lake counties from Sunday afternoon through the evening. The watch comes as moderate to heavy rainfall rates are expected to bring the potential for urban and small stream flooding.

Below is the latest on roadways throughout our region. UPDATES at 9:55 a.m. in Green. UPDATES at 12:15 in blue

Major Highways–Here’s What We Know:

(Most information below is from Caltrans’ Quick Map. If you are heading to Oregon, check their similar site. If you are heading to Nevada, check their similar site.)

    • Interstate 5: Open but snowy in some parts. Here’s Motts Road north of Dunsmuir in Siskiyou County.
    • Hwy 1: Open normally except Route 1 is OPEN to one-way controlled traffic near Navarro Bluff Road (PM 40.1-40.2)
    • Hwy 3:  Open with chains required on and off from 7 miles north of Hayfork to 8 miles south of Douglas City.
    • Hwy 20: Open but a request for closure by CDF just north of Lucerne due to flooding.
    • Hwy 36: Open with chains required on and off from 3 miles east of Mad River to Platina.
    • Hwy 96: Open
    • Hwy 101: Open
    • HWY 162 (Covelo Road): Open
    • Hwy 169 (Klamath): Open
    • Hwy 199: Open
    • Hwy 211: Open
    • Hwy 254 (Avenue of the Giants): Open
    • Hwy 255: Open
    • Hwy 271: Open
    • Hwy 299: Open with chains required on and off from 11 miles east of Douglas City to 19 miles west of Redding.

      Snow in patches on 299 at Berry Summit.

      Snow in patches on 299 at Berry Summit.

Humboldt County Roads: No information at this time.

Trinity County Roads: No information at this time.

Mendocino County Roads: No information at this time.

Tips for Travel: Please note that if you are stuck while traveling in winter weather, that an inexpensive heater can be fashioned from a tin and tea candles. The whole heating device takes up very little space in a glove box.

Consumer Affairs magazine describes how the kit works and why you should use it. They say,

If you’re trapped in your car, running the engine to generate heat is a bad idea for two reasons: one, even starting with a full tank you’ll run out of gas in a few hours, thus leaving you unable to move even when the road eventually clears; and two, if falling or drifting snow or ice blocks your car’s exhaust pipe, you and everyone else in the passenger compartment can quickly die of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Fortunately, it’s easy to make heat without running the engine, and you can put together an emergency automotive heating kit for less than $5. You only need four items: a large-ish metal can with a removable lid, a supply of metal-cup “tea light” candles, some matches, and waterproof resealable sandwich or freezer bags to hold the candles and matches inside the metal can.

(See here for a complete description on how to create this kit to carry with you.)

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14 Comments
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Bozo
Guest
Bozo
22 days ago

Three things for survival.

1) Warmth. Coat, good shoes/socks, wool stocking cap, gloves, and a sleeping bag.
2) Water.
3) Some food. Trail bars (etc).

If at all possible, let somebody know where you are going/expected arrival time.

Pretty easy to do.

North westCertain license plate out of thousands c
Guest
North westCertain license plate out of thousands c
22 days ago
Reply to  Bozo

A road flare is a great fire starter and belongs with your emergency supplies. A way to stay warm is essential.

Bozo
Guest
Bozo
21 days ago

Oddly, I’ve never had good luck starting a fire with a flare… and I mean like zero percent. I’m pretty sure the ‘exhaust plume’ from the flare actually extinguishes fires, (which is probably by design).
Chunk of paper, a match, and a bit of diesel drained from the truck fuel filter does work fine though. Depending on the weather, finding dry kindling and wood in 24″ of snow or months of soaking rain is a bit tough though.
You can probably do it if you are physically fit… and have a knife/axe/saw… but if you have those… then you are might be pretty well prepared.
If you are going to pack stuff along, Esbit fuel cubes and storm-proof matches work. They also make a little tin ‘stove’, and a Stanley water cup… but then again, that’s being prepared.
Going to do that… then you should have a ‘bug-out’ bag.
(IMHO: Which is a good idea anyway.)

fndrbndr
Member
22 days ago

12 inches of snow and counting here!

guest__
Member
guest__
22 days ago
Reply to  fndrbndr

Where are you located?

Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
22 days ago
Reply to  fndrbndr

Where is “here”?

fndrbndr
Member
22 days ago

45 minutes from Willow Creek at 4200′. Supposed to get another foot by Tuesday. Hoping to get to town sometime in March.

Last edited 22 days ago
Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
22 days ago
Reply to  fndrbndr

At least you won’t get a communicable disease. Stay safe and warm. I recommend fuzzy socks.

fndrbndr
Member
22 days ago

Remedy for both. “Pickle yourself with Fireball”😋
Thanks Ernie!

Last edited 22 days ago
guest__
Guest
guest__
22 days ago

picture of zenia-ruth road heading over the pass on friday around 4pm. taking the same direction on monday. hmm

Last edited 22 days ago
Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
22 days ago

Lights are blinking off and on in Benbow most all morning.

Keahi
Guest
Keahi
22 days ago

Mendocino County woke up to a power outage at about 6:00. A.M. Looking at PG&E’s outage map, it is massive, going all the way down the coast, dots on that map in Sonoma, the Bay Area, all the way to San Luis Obispo. Looks like we’ll be out for awhile. Think Humboldt was spared. For now.

Humboldt
Member
Humboldt
22 days ago
Reply to  Keahi

Yes. Surprisingly, we only have rain in Willow Creek and the power has stayed on.
Most unusual La Nina winter.

ataloss
Guest
ataloss
21 days ago

Pelting rain from Mendocino just south of Laytonville to Petaluma. Trees down along 101 south of Hopland