State Parks’ DBW Accepting Grant Applications to Fund Shoreline Erosion Control Efforts

Press release from California State Parks and Recreation:

shore line with houses perched above beach

Shoreline near San Clemente Pier in the City of San Clemente. This is the site of a beach restoration project led by the Army Corps of Engineers and currently scheduled for construction this winter. [Photo from Division of Boating and Waterways.]

California State Parks’ Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) is now accepting grant applications from government agencies to help slow, stop, or reverse the impact of erosion on California’s shoreline. The deadline to submit applications for the Shoreline Erosion Control and Public Beach Restoration programs is Thursday, Feb. 1, 2024, by noon.

Federal, state, regional and local government agencies use Shoreline Erosion Control grants to build structures that protect public infrastructure in developed shoreline areas against wave erosion, and Public Beach Restoration grants to strategically place sand on eroded beaches.

In fiscal year 2022/23, the following three projects were approved under the Public Beach Restoration Program:

  • $11,500,000 for a project in Encinitas and Solana Beach.
  • $2,900,000 for a project in Orange County, including Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and Newport Beach.
  • $1,085,000 for a project in San Clemente.

Grant funding is available through a competitive process. To apply for a fiscal year 2025/26 grant, an agency must submit a formal application to DBW requesting funding for a specific phase of a project (feasibility study, design, or construction) along with a resolution from its governing body authorizing the application for grant funding. Projects are authorized for funding through the state’s budget process. Individual projects, if approved, would be notified of available funding in June 2025.

Applications for both grant programs must be submitted to DBW through its Online Grant Application System (OLGA). Prior to applying, the division encourages new applicants to view a 45-minute webinar that provides detailed instructions on creating an account in OLGA as well as navigating the application system.

sandy beach along shoreline with people walking on beach.

Completed erosion control structure at Twin Lakes State Beach in the City of Santa Cruz. The structure was designed to mimic natural features of the adjacent sandy coastline. [Photo from Division of Boating and Waterways.]

Sections 65 through 67.4 of the Harbors and Navigation Code (HNC) authorizes DBW to study erosion problems, act as shore protection advisor to all agencies of government, and plan, design and construct protective works when funds are provided by the Legislature. In addition, HNC Sections 69.5-69.9 authorizes the division to pursue and promote federal and local partnerships to restore, enhance, and nourish publicly owned beaches through the cost-effective engineered placement of sand on the beach or in the nearshore environment.Additional information about the application process is available on DBW’s website at dbw.parks.ca.gov/Erosion-RestorationGrants. For questions on the application process, please contact DBW Project Manager Casey Caldwell at (916) 902-8824.

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6 Comments
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Bozo
Guest
Bozo
1 month ago

Well, the tide comes in… and the tide goes out. Ocean doesn’t sleep.
Maybe they should plant some European Beach Grass ?
Wasted money.

Go figure.

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DanD
Member
Dan
1 month ago

Crack me up!
In Humboldt, Team Erosion rips vegetation off the coast until the
fore dunes disappear, trees die, and wetlands desiccate, violating every environmental
ethic known to man.
The pretend enviros hide the results.

Lanphere_Dunes.jpg
Mr. Clark
Member
Mr. Clark
1 month ago

what a waste of time and money

Al L Ivesmatr
Guest
Al L Ivesmatr
1 month ago

The shoreline has been eroding for hundreds of thousands of years. Man is just dumb enough to build right on the beach and then wonder why winter waves take out their deck every other year. Go figure. See all the offshore rocks off Trinidad. See the fossil beds of clams and old sand dunes 500 feet above the Eel River below Bear Buttes and on the ridge above Trinidad. Humans are stopping nothing. Everyone would be better served to go walk a shelter dog rather than to pay any attention to the constant drumbeat of the fake Oscar the Grouch man caused climate change religious edicts of the Windmill people. Piltdown Windmill people……flat earthers.

DanD
Member
Dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Al L Ivesmatr

Study the Science of Cowardin, of wetlands and their ability to accrete faster than Sea Level Rise.
Being on the West Coast, in the Northern Hemisphere we have onshore flow. We can capture the eroded sand product of our overharvested forests, and capture it with grasses that will sustain wildlife habitats, and slow the wind while creating resilience.
We were doing it!
Then came the ideology of nativism and our wildlife disappeared along with our constructed wetlands.
We’ve been teaching children ideology dressed as science.
Here is what NOAA Science has to say;
https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/insight/understanding-living-shorelines

Keep your shoreline alive!

jimimmel
Guest
jimimmel
1 month ago

Te arrogance of man and the corruption of science. We need a revolution for sure.