‘Change our Name Fort Bragg’ to Host Public Teach-in

Press release from Change Our Name Fort Bragg:

change our name graphic with "change our name" multiple times in a rainbow of colorsChange Our Name Fort Bragg Invites the public to a Teach-in on Monday, December 4, at 7:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church located at 367 S. Sanderson Way, Fort Bragg.

A local grass roots non-profit, Change Our Name Fort Bragg is dedicated to an educational process that leads to changing the name of Fort Bragg so that it no longer honors a military Fort that dispossessed Indigenous people or Braxton Bragg, a Confederate General[,] who waged war against our country.

Envisioned as a program to educate attendees about the issues involved in the name change and to hear neighbors’ ideas, the teach-in will last about one hour and will feature three speakers and a question and answer/discussion period.

Speakers will be:

Christie Olson Day arrived in Fort Bragg 25 years ago, and both her children were born and raised here. She owns and manages Gallery Bookshop, on Main Street in Mendocino, and in 2020 served on the Fort Bragg City Council Citizens’ Commission to consider changing the town’s name.

David Martin, originally from Sacramento, moved to Noyo 35 years ago to fish commercially. He bought a house here, got married, raised a child, and had a kayak shop in the harbor for several years.

Carol Furey has lived in the 95437 zip code  for over half her life. She is a home health care assistant and family caregiver.

Discussing a controversial topic requires civility and respect for the opinions of others. This program is neither sponsored by nor affiliated with First Presbyterian Church.

This program is free and open to all.

for further information: changeournamefortbragg@gmail.com

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Join the discussion! For rules visit: https://kymkemp.com/commenting-rules

Comments system how-to: https://wpdiscuz.com/community/postid/10599/

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

45 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
geoffrey davis
Guest
geoffrey davis
6 months ago

And dont even talk about who Laraby was…. Cold blooded baby killer

I am a robot
Guest
I am a robot
6 months ago
Reply to  geoffrey davis

Kelseyville (Lake County) is another place that badly needs a name change

Jim Dogger
Guest
Jim Dogger
6 months ago
Reply to  I am a robot

I came here to make that same comment. What a shitty name to attach to your town.

D'Tucker Jebs
Member
6 months ago
Reply to  geoffrey davis

Washington, Jeffersion, and Grant had plenty of Indian blood on their hands.
There are plenty of local paces named after them.
Washington and Jefferson were also slaveholders. Why do these protests seem to be only focused at Confederates and not slaveholders in general?

Thatguyinarcata
Guest
Thatguyinarcata
6 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

What’s named after Washington, Jefferson, or Grant locally?

D'Tucker Jebs
Member
6 months ago

In Eureka: Grant School, Washington School, Jefferson Community Center (formerly Jefferson School)

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

Grant was stationed at Fort Humboldt early in his career.

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

You need to bone up on the history of the Confederacy. Yes, Washington and Jefferson and other founders owned human beings as livestock. This concept increasingly became unacceptable as a crime against humanity. The northern States increasingly came to believe in the Declaration of Independence with its “self-evident truths” about “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” The South did not, They believed that about 4 million Black folks they held in bondage were created . , . Wait for it . . .by God to serve the superior race. Guess who that is.
The “lost cause” as explained by Confederate Vice President Stephens in March, 1861 in Savannah, GA in his infamous “cornerstone” speech explains the founding doctrine of the eleven-State Confederacy: all people are expressly and precisely NOT created equal. The Confederate “cornerstone” was racism, antithetical to the Declaration of Independence, “conceived in Liberty . . .” Crystal clear? You bet.
if the Confederacy had succeeded in seceding, we would have had an 11-State cancer dedicated to racism on the belly of N. America and a likely ally of Imperial Japan and Nazi Germany in the last century.
America and the world owe an immense debt to the American patriots who defeated the traitorous “civilization, gone with the wind”. Good riddance and bless that wind. No public work or edifice should be named in honor of traitors to The United States of America.
A very special debt is owed to the tall, homely man from the American frontier, who, along with Jesus Christ and Napoleon, has intrigued and perplexed the finest scholars for 150 years. Guess who? Take all the time you need. Binge watchers of “The Good Place” know only one American President has made it to Heaven.
No special honors to Confederate Officers. Give ‘em their spot in history (it sucks) and be done with it,

willow creekerD
Member
6 months ago

Good rant. It’s so important to learn from history, and think about where we are now. Who’s going to be considered to be on the right side of our current struggles, 100 years from now? Think about it.

Guest
Guest
Guest
6 months ago
Reply to  willow creeker

I read Ft. Bragg got its name because some pre civil war military bureaucrat had to find names for various places that had no names in English so troops and supplies could be directed. And he ran out of ideas. Although Bragg had at the time a fair reputation of his military service, it was, not as Wikipedia puts it, named in his honor. It was nothing more that a spot on a map that needed a designation.

It’s important to learn from history but not the Jehovah-as-a-righteous-judge, bible thumping, morally outraged, preaching kind. It is hard to believe there is anyone today could still be seriously pretending to fight the Civil War when it was done over a hundred and fifty years ago and people actually spent lives and all their resources doing it. Easy hindsight, safe victories and self righteousness are pathetic in the light of current problems that do not seem to have viable resolutions but desperately need them. Such outrage and insistence on pathetic revenge against dead people is an embarassment.

Last edited 6 months ago
Wizard of Odds
Guest
Wizard of Odds
6 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

Native* blood

Stephan B
Guest
Stephan B
6 months ago
Reply to  D'Tucker Jebs

Whataboutism fallacy, never a good argumentative point

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  geoffrey davis

Larabee of Larabee Valley and creek was a ghastly example of a human being according to noted local historian Jerry Rohde.

Dogbiter
Guest
Dogbiter
6 months ago

Fart Gagg

Jim Dogger
Guest
Jim Dogger
6 months ago
Reply to  Dogbiter

I like it.

CsMisadventures
Guest
CsMisadventures
6 months ago

Yeesh. I’m surprised it took this long for folks to pipe up and say something about Mr. Bragg. From a wiki entry, et al, he’s noted as a world-class A-hole with a Napoleon complex (and similar wartime outcomes) with Trump-ish tendencies to blame everyone but himself puts it lightly. Even Ulysses S. Grant, who actually spent a short stint in Humboldt had this to say about the former slave owner, “My God, Mr. Bragg, you have quarreled with every officer in the army, and now you are quarreling with yourself!”

From here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braxton_Bragg

James M. McPherson’s reference to “the bumblers like Bragg and Pemberton and Hood who lost the West”[63] sums up the judgment of many modern historians. Bragg’s shortcomings as an army commander included his unimaginative tactics, mostly his reliance on frontal assault (such as the Hornet’s Nest at Shiloh, Breckinridge’s assault at Stones River, and numerous instances at Chickamauga), and his lack of post-battle follow-up that turned tactical victories or draws into strategic disappointments (Perryville and Chickamauga). His sour disposition, a penchant for blaming others for defeat, and poor interpersonal skills undoubtedly caused him to be criticized more directly than many of his unsuccessful contemporaries. Peter Cozzens wrote about his relationship with subordinates:[64]

Even Bragg’s staunchest supporters admonished him for his quick temper, general irritability, and tendency to wound innocent men with barbs thrown during his frequent fits of anger. His reluctance to praise or flatter was exceeded, we are told, only by the tenacity with which, once formed, he clung to an adverse impression of a subordinate. For such officers—and they were many in the Army of Mississippi—Bragg’s removal or their transfer were the only alternatives to an unbearable existence.
— Peter Cozzens, No Better Place to Die: The Battle of Stones River

Bozo
Guest
Bozo
6 months ago

A reasonable persons says… “Like who gives a crap ?”

Guest
Guest
Guest
6 months ago
Reply to  Bozo

Question: With all the strife, major issues and real need in this struggling world, can’t these people find something else more helpful to do than waste time and resources on changing Fort Bragg’s name? Same applies to the First Presbyterian Church.

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago
Reply to  Guest

👍 I’m sure there are plenty of things that would help indigenous people more than changing the name of a town.

Pay attention
Guest
Pay attention
6 months ago

Not one of you that moved here cared about the name or you would not have so what’s the deal now ?? I was born here (68)and our history has all been around fishing and logging because that’s what built Fort Bragg and the surrounding communitys. So when you come here and want to change our name I say pound sand!!

Jim Dogger
Guest
Jim Dogger
6 months ago
Reply to  Pay attention

Too bad y’all cut down every old growth tree and plucked all the abalone. Thanks for the legacy.

Rick
Guest
Rick
6 months ago

If they are trying eliminate the names of Western Expansionists, they will be playing these games and wasting money for the next several generations. I assume Fort Bragg has found a solution for the homelessness, domestic violence, drug abuse, decrepit roads and infrastructure? The police, schools
and fire departments must have a surplus in their budgets too huh? Well done!

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago
Reply to  Rick

👍

North westCertain license plate out of thousands c
Guest
North westCertain license plate out of thousands c
6 months ago
Reply to  Rick

Nope. Just the confederate traders.
They should only exist in history books and the Hall of shame.

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  Rick

Who said “Western Expansionists”? I can’t find it.

Outside Looking In
Guest
Outside Looking In
6 months ago

It’d be much easier to simply move to another town that already has a name you like than it is to force everybody to change everything on your account.

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago

Just curious, How many dispossessed Indigenous people live in Fort Bragg?
And will Change Our Name Fort Bragg pay for All the costs associated with the change?
Everything from business and citizens that have to change their advertising, alert their family and friends, customers, of their new address, maps that have to changed, new stationary, Buildings that would need new signs, freeway exit and on ramp signs, the list is endless.
What is the end result? Some people would feel better.
How many people even think of a Fort named after Bragg anyway?
I never have.
I suspect most out-of-towners think of it as the place the Skunk Train takes them.

Last edited 6 months ago
thetallone
Guest
thetallone
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Plus all those free return address labels they’ve been sending me will be worthless.

Angela Robinson
Member
Angela Robinson
6 months ago
Reply to  thetallone

Ha! Though you could just strike through “Fort Bragg”, the zip code would be the same…I think.

Angela Robinson
Member
Angela Robinson
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Fort Bragg is named after a Confederate General, Braxton Bragg. It was named that before he became a traitor to the Union. I wonder if the 1st Lt. who named it after his former commanding officer would have done so if he knew Bragg would do that a few years later. That 1st Lt. would fight for the Union in the Civil War.

Btw, the more famous former Fort Bragg, in NC, is now Fort Liberty. Braxton Bragg was known as a very poor military leader, btw. Not someone to “brag” about.

It would be a pain in the rear to change things, that I do agree with. Noyo has a nice ring to it, though.

There are 3789 (as of 2020) Indigenous people in Mendocino County.

Last edited 6 months ago
HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago

‘I feel like a badass’: Native American rodeo thrives as a younger generation takes the reins
https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:l-G603fDlAAJ:https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2023/nov/25/i-feel-like-a-badass-native-american-rodeo-is-thriving-as-a-younger-generation-takes-the-reins&hl=en&gl=us

I’m more for supporting a positive image of Native Americans and their talents, instead of the let’s wipe out History because I’m a victim image so common today.
Today they are known for the drugs and crime on the reservations, yet with support and inclusion they have much to offer, whining about history from a century ago by people no longer alive, takes away from that support, it doesn’t help foster it
Until recently, never in my life had I even heard about Bragg, and I doubt many people care about him.
Certainly it would do more to sponsor a Rodeo for Natives of Mendocino than to change a name.

Last edited 6 months ago
thetallone
Guest
thetallone
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

I don’t see anything in this press release that says the pro name-change people are native.

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Many, if not most, of the “dispossessed indigenous people” were flat out killed so that makes it hard to live anywhere, like, you know, if you’re dead. Survivors were shipped to reservations where there culture, language and religion were destroyed except for the efforts of a few stalwarts. Nowadays, with full American citizenship, survivors can live where they want to. I am not sure what difference it makes what the current number in Ft. Bragg is.

what’s fair is fair
Guest
what’s fair is fair
6 months ago

can we change the name of the Democrat Party yet? They waged war against our country, they fought to enslave black people, they made laws to deny minorities of their constitutional rights.

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago

Interesting point. The Democrats were the original pro-slavery Party and Republicans were the freedom folks (for men, anyway) with Abraham Lincoln as their first candidate,
about 1930 or so, with FDR, the Parties switched allegiances with Democrats assuming the mantle of working class people and minorities with Republicans assuming the mantle of big business and special interests (misogynists, racists). Really amazing. Strom Thurmond dropped out of the Democrats when they started worrying about civil rights.
since a craven wretch, Donald John Trump, now represents the Modern Republican Party, how could a name change reflect that? Make America Grovel Again”? MAGAts for American Demise? Party of Putin? Anti-Lincoln? Reverse-Midas?

Jim Dogger
Guest
Jim Dogger
6 months ago

“Reverse-midas” made me lol

Farce
Guest
Farce
6 months ago

Money-wasting social warrior grandstanding…Go get a life!

fb native
Guest
6 months ago

I agree if the name offends you , MOVE! As a 4th generation Fort Bragger, I am repulsed at the idea of changing the name of my town. Why don’t we change the name of all Hispanic named places. Lets come up with neutral names, like town number 1 and 2. Slavery is long gone in the U S. Western expansion is long gone in our History. Live in the now and boycott these people who push this B.S., I will!

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago

There seems to be just a bit of romanticizing about Indigenous Native Americans.

Native American Warfare in the West: Conflict Among the Southwestern Indians
https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/native-american-warfare-west-conflict-among-southwestern-indians

……………………………………………..

Native Americans were familiar with wars among each other even before the “white man” showed up.

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

War with the SpanishThe Spanish first encountered the Apache, whom they called Querechos, in 1541 in the Texas panhandle. At the time the Apache were buffalo hunting nomads and semi-nomads who had trading relationships with the Pueblos of the Rio Grande valley. The early contacts were friendly, but in the 17th century, the relationship between Spaniard and Apache deteriorated because of slave raids by the Spaniards and Apache attacks on the Spanish and Pueblo settlements in New Mexico.
The Apache migrated south and west, under pressure from the Comanche who were also expanding southward. Being pushed off the buffalo-rich Great Plains into the more austere desert and mountains of the Southwest probably caused the Apache to become more dependent upon raiding for a livelihood. By 1692, they were present in the present-day state of Chihuahua, Mexico. They soon were also visiting Sonora and Coahuila and seem to have absorbed several other Indian peoples native to the future U.S.-Mexico border area, the Suma, Manso, Jano, and Jocome. Chihuahua, Sonora, and Coahuila were more populated and richer than the Spanish colonies in New Mexico, and Apache raiding soon became a serious problem. In 1737, a Spanish military officer said, “many mines have been destroyed, 15 large estancias [ranches] along the frontier have been totally destroyed, having lost two hundred head of cattle, mules, and horses; several missions have been burned and two hundred Christians have lost their lives to the Apache enemy, who sustains himself only with the bow and arrow, killing and stealing livestock.”[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache%E2%80%93Mexico_Wars
……………………………………..
Links removed are at the link to Wiki

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Yes. Original inhabitants had all the faults and foibles of people everywhere. Warfare and mistreatment of captives occurred and some customs would be abhorrent by any standards. Honor and nobility could exist with horror and hate. Just like everywhere. Never sure which would prevail. Just like right now, right here in River City.
None of this excuses genocide anywhere, anytime, by anyone.

HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago

Who excused genocide?

Fort Bragg 6881 people, 2% Native American.

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/fortbraggcitycalifornia/PST045222

So, 98% of the people effected would have to go through many changes for 2%. It seems there are better ways to help the Native Americans.
Open an Art & Culture center where they can share their heritage and sell their Arts, Jewelry, Blankets, and maybe books on their Culture, possibly bringing more Natives into the town, it would contribute to both the Natives and the Town.
They could open a café inside and serve Native foods.
Think creatively! Sponsor that.
There’s more pride in creating than in complaining.

Last edited 6 months ago
HotCoffee
Guest
HotCoffee
6 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

I’ve never eaten at a Native American restaurant, but I would love to.

Al L Ivesmatr
Guest
Al L Ivesmatr
6 months ago

More loons. So, all EVs should be banned because the cobalt in them comes from black child slaves mining the mineral in the Congo. I would think these loons would know this but they don’t say a word. It screws up their entire narrative. Instead of changing history, they should modify their lifestyle as it exploits child slaves who are black. It’s totally gross. In order to accomplish equity on this issue of black child slaves, the loons white kids should be exported to the Congo to mine Cobalt. In return, all the black child miners can be imported to America. That seems like more than a fair exchange checking off the diversity and equity boxes. Any takers, loons? Didn’t think so, ya frickin frauds.

Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
6 months ago
Reply to  Al L Ivesmatr

White Lies Matter. Try the decaf.