Salmon Run

a male and female salmon preparing to spawn; the mail is reddish purple, the female is greenish brown

A male and female Salmon preparing to spawn in the south fork of the Eel River near the Humboldt Mendocino County Line [Photo by Talia Rose]

The salmon are running.

One of the benefits of getting older is the ability to notice patterns, things that escaped us when we were younger. With time and distance, we can step back and watch the ebb and flow of life cycles and the way in which the world around us has changed.

This year, if all goes right, may promise to be good year for the fish in the south fork of the Eel River against all odds. The salmon have been running, in numbers most of us have only witnessed a handful of times.

nps lifecycle of salmon infographic

[Info sheet from the National Park Service]

Some attribute this to adaptation as smolts are being found in creeks with temperatures normally too high for survival. The removal of the Benbow Dam and ongoing restoration work is also believed to be positively impacting fish counts in spite of drought conditions.

Local wildlife photographer, Talia Rose, was able to capture images and video of the salmon run in mid-November.

To learn more about restoration efforts in tributaries to the south fork of the Eel River, read ‘Hope for Salmon in the Tenmile Creek Watershed‘.

To view more of Talia’s wildlife photography, visit her County Line Wild Facebook page.

school of salmon silhoetted in blue water

School of Salmon [Photo by Talia Rose]

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25 Comments
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NoBody
Guest
NoBody
2 months ago

Learned something new. I always thought that salmon swim. 😬

Last edited 2 months ago by NoBody
Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  NoBody

🤔🧐Nobody thinks that’s funny…😁

NoBody
Guest
NoBody
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

Maybe my cousin SomeBody will. 😀

Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  NoBody

🤔🧐

Somebody, for sure, thinks it’s funny…

🙂

Last edited 2 months ago by Guest
grey fox
Member
grey fox
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

Everybody thinks it’s funny.

Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  grey fox

🤔🧐Nobody agrees…😁

Vet
Guest
Vet
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

I think YOU are pretty funny

Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  Vet

🤔🧐You should see me when I dress up in my costume…🇺🇸😁

Last edited 2 months ago by Guest
Steven Martin
Guest
2 months ago
Hick
Guest
Hick
2 months ago

Hey buddy, your door is a’jar.

NoBody
Guest
NoBody
2 months ago
Reply to  Hick

My door identifies as a jar.

Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
2 months ago

I’m thoroughly enjoying the humor here today. But… Back to the point. I’ve noticed that there are salmon in most every hole just below a riffle. As a 5th generation native of the south fork Eel noticing the salmon runs has become genetic to me.

Most of my family would spend thanksgiving day fishing. The fall rains would bring the salmon up the river and the weather always seemed to clear up just enough to fish. The Old-Timers seemed to know what the weather would be, long before the accurate forecasts of today. All the storms and dry spells were named and expected.

The time to view salmon is perfect right now, The river is crystal clear. A great place to see them is the pool just north of Fish Creek in Benbow. Take the old road south of Benbow Drive, park by the big rock and hike up the dirt road over the old slide. Look in the pool just below the riffle. 25 or so salmon are in the pool. They have been in the river a long time, some are very sore.

The great runs this year are more a result of good spawning conditions 2-3 years ago than any other factor.

Vet
Guest
Vet
2 months ago

The weather patterns used to be considerably more consistant, making it much easier to make plans. The weather has become progressively more erratic in the past 50 years.

farfromputin
Member
farfromputin
2 months ago

As the salmon go so goes the human race, unfortunately.

R-DOG
Guest
R-DOG
2 months ago
Reply to  farfromputin

When the earth has nothing more to give then it will die

Entering a world of pain
Guest
Entering a world of pain
2 months ago

Would very much love to see a large resurgence in the amazing, resilient, beautiful and flavorful salmon in local watersheds.
I remember as a kid in the 80s, the fish came up Ten Mile in great numbers all the way to (and beyond) the Steele Ln. bridge

Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
2 months ago

My dad talked about steelhead in the creek beside the PG&E substation in Laytonville when he was a kid.

Ernie Branscomb
Guest
Ernie Branscomb
2 months ago

All the water in that creek now goes to a pond in the upper creek.

Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago

My Uncle fished for steelhead in the LA River…

Guest
Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

Looks like there still might be a few in there…

But they should probably be left alone…

https://fishwithjd.com/2009/04/01/los-angeles-river-steelheading/

Screenshot_20221126-171425.png
Lost Croat OutburstD
Member
Lost Croat Outburst
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

The L.A. River was perhaps the last regularly used steelhead stream in the southernmost extreme range of steelhead. Now, it’s been straightened and almost totally paved, “completely improved” as the oxymoron goes. Several good car chases were filmed there, but the best may be “To Live and die in L.A.”. This “dickflick” is quite a testosterone hit, but worth it for young Willem Dafoe and William Peterson. Keep a bit of epinephrine around if you hyperventilate.
Rumors say an occasional steelhead still flops it’s way across the concrete in wet years, looking for a mate and some gravel.

Entering a world of pain
Guest
Entering a world of pain
2 months ago

Cahto Creek ?

Salmon grammar police
Guest
Salmon grammar police
2 months ago

In the sentence immediately following the Life Cycle diagram… the correct term is not smelt, but smolts, which are juvenile salmonids migrating downstream and transitioning from freshwater to saltwater.

Cetan Bluesky
Guest
Cetan Bluesky
2 months ago

JOY!