OR93 Found Dead in Kern County

OR93 wolf

[Photo from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW)]

Press release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW):

On November 10, OR93 was found dead near Interstate 5 near the town of Lebec, California. Following a full investigation and necropsy, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has determined that the wolf died from trauma consistent with vehicular strike and does not suspect foul play.

On the afternoon of November 10, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife received a phone call from a truck driver who witnessed the deceased wolf along a dirt trail near a frontage road running parallel to I-5. A CDFW warden responded to the scene to collect the carcass which was quickly identified as OR93 because of its collar.

The carcass was transported to the Wildlife Health Laboratory in Rancho Cordova, California where a complete necropsy was performed. The wolf had significant tissue trauma to the left rear leg and a dislocated knee as well as soft tissue trauma to the abdomen. The injuries were deemed to be caused by a vehicle strike.

Young gray wolves can disperse very long distances from their natal area and OR93 is no exception. Before his demise, he was documented traveling the farthest south in California since wolves returned to the state, which is historically wolf habitat. The last documented wolf that far south was captured in San Bernardino County in 1922.

OR93 was a male wolf born in 2019. He dispersed from the White River pack in northern Oregon. When his collar was providing information, he was tracked entering Modoc County on January 30, 2021. After briefly returning to Oregon, he reentered Modoc County on February 4. On February 24, he entered Alpine County after passing through portions of Lassen, Plumas, Sierra, Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador and Calaveras counties. On February 25, he entered Mono County. In mid-March, he was in western Tuolumne County. By late March he was in Fresno County, and then entered San Benito County after crossing Highway 99 and Interstate 5. He was in Monterey County on April 1 and his last collar transmission was from San Luis Obispo County on April 5. Through April 5 he had traveled at least 935 air miles in California, a minimum average of 16 air miles per day.

CDFW strongly encourages the public to be aware that the wolf population continues to grow in California and to know the difference between wolves and coyotes. Though gray wolves are generally much bigger than coyotes, they can sometimes be misidentified. We encourage the public to review this wolf identification page which provides tips for differentiating between wolves, coyotes and dogs.

Gray wolves are listed as endangered pursuant to California’s Endangered Species Act (CESA). It is unlawful to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap or capture gray wolves. Anyone who believes they have seen a wolf in California can report it to CDFW at wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Mammals/Gray-Wolf/Sighting-Report.

Gray wolves pose very little safety risk to humans. CDFW is working to monitor and conserve California’s small wolf population and is collaborating with livestock producers and diverse stakeholders to minimize wolf-livestock conflicts.

Gray wolf management in California is guided by CESA as well as CDFW’s Conservation Plan for Gray Wolves in California, finalized in 2016. More information is available on CDFW’s wolf webpage at: wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/mammals/gray-wolf.

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46 Comments
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Don T MattaD
Don T Matta(@donmatta)
1 month ago

What a shame!!! :-C

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
1 month ago

I’ve never heard “foul play” attributed to the investigation of an animal.

Roads are animal killers.

Guest
Guest
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Why did the chicken cross the road?

Because there was a wolf chasing it.

Maybe they suspected, “fowl play”?

Last edited 1 month ago by Guest
Don T MattaD
Don T Matta(@donmatta)
1 month ago
Reply to  Guest

Exsqueeze me a moment, I need to roll up my pantlegs, it’s getting a little deep in here!!! ;op Bad puns seem to stack up quicker!!!

What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
1 month ago
Reply to  Don T Matta

NO, Why did the chicken cross the road? Because the farmer had foul overhauls!!

Prof. Quiz
Prof. Quiz
1 month ago
Reply to  Guest

In the old days there was a saying – “Thde only good wolf is a dead wolf”. And as they say now a days, “Shoot, shovel, and shut up.” Next thing you know these “environmentalists” will want to bring back the Grizzly.

North west
North west
1 month ago
Reply to  Prof. Quiz

If they don’t reintroduce Grizzlies they should at least take it off of the California flag.
Waving shame at us every day

Prof. Quiz
Prof. Quiz
1 month ago
Reply to  North west

Apparently you don’t like taking a stroll through the woods . . They were wiped out for a reason.

If you want to see a Grizzly, try trout fishing along a brushy stream in Montana.

Mr. BearD
Mr. Bear(@disqus_yuvjd9erak)
1 month ago
Reply to  Prof. Quiz

I have. It’s great. I’d be fine with a grizzly or two

Martin
Martin
1 month ago
Reply to  Prof. Quiz

Better yet, go trout fishing in Alaska if you want to fish with the bears. That will also give the bears another food source – you.

c u 2morrowD
c u 2morrow(@cu2morrow)
1 month ago
Reply to  North west

I thought that was an 1800’s Republican flippin us off

Trashman
Trashman
1 month ago
Reply to  Prof. Quiz

They are all tagged, if you kill one you will be in trouble no matter what it’s doing, running over one is plausible.

I like stars
I like stars
1 month ago
Reply to  Prof. Quiz

Those who support immigration may want to consider the plight of the tiger. Many are in constant danger in their home countries and should be candidates for asylum.

Connie DobbsD
Connie Dobbs(@disqus_z3w956ss5l)
1 month ago
Reply to  I like stars

I would drive extra carefully to avoid hitting a tiger.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Has become a common subject of wolf death investigations.

So many people believe the myth that wolves are the main problem with predation of livestock.
Just not true…is the coyotes mostly…upwards of 95-99%.

Human on wolf predation in the lower 48 started again as soon as wolves were reintroduced.

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
1 month ago
Reply to  Non-fiction

I’m a fan of the wolf and I have livestock.

Mendoboldtborderbrother
Mendoboldtborderbrother
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

If a wolf killed your livestock, would you still be a “fan” of the wolf ?

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
1 month ago

Yes. A cougar tried to kill one of our foals. I still like mountain lions. Vigilance is just part of living in the wilds.

Nooo
Nooo
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

What form does your Vigilance take?

The Real Brian
The Real Brian(@brianroman911)
1 month ago
Reply to  Nooo

What rymes with “Wild in the house” for $500.00, Alex.

Guest
Guest
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

If a wolf had tried to kill you, or had threatened your children, would you still be a fan?

I am not.

Nooo
Nooo
1 month ago
Reply to  Guest

The part that I am not a fan is the part that decisions are made in urban places who never will likely have to bear the consequences. The part that can not be reasonable and talks in absolutes.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  Guest

Wolf on human predation has never been a commonality.

There are stats and reports going back to the 1500-1600s for North America.

Nearly every wolk attack on humans was accomplished by RABID wolves.
Literally nearly every attack was followed by the human survivors dying of rabies.

The fear mongering over wolves is not supported by facts.

But if you prefer to “believe” the fairy tales, making decisions based on facts isn’t your forte anyway.

What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

When they are poisoned or shot by a bow and arrow or a rifle, hand gun or shot gun.

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
1 month ago

Yes, I know. I just have never heard DFW apply it to an animal.

Dillon
Dillon
1 month ago

I’m glad that thing is dead. So stupid to reintroduce a problematic animal. A stupid idea to introduce an animal that is going to do nothing but kill more animals. Must be a liberal idea.

Meghan
Meghan
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

You’re a problematic animal.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

The endangered species act was signed into law by a Nixon, a republican.
Was a UNANIMOUS vote in the Senate.
390-12 in the House.

Ever heard of ecology?

Predators are natural controls on prey animals.

They reduce disease and limit overpopulation in all prey populations amongst many other natural jobs and benefits dingbats can’t even imagine.

You need to get educated.
But first that cranial rectosis will need treatment.
See the light not the bullshit.

Liberally applied willful ignorance is a cancer

Last edited 1 month ago by Non-fiction
Joe
Joe
1 month ago
Reply to  Non-fiction

Open hunting season reduces overpopulation also

Mendoboldtborderbrother
Mendoboldtborderbrother
1 month ago
Reply to  Joe

Agreed , look up the CDFW hunting regs in California for coyotes. The wolves should not be treated differently

Mendoboldtborderbrother
Mendoboldtborderbrother
1 month ago
Reply to  Joe

Agreed. Look up the CDFW hunting regulations on coyotes. Wolves shouldn’t be treated any differently

What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
1 month ago
Reply to  Joe

Not for Does.

Guest
Guest
1 month ago

In some states it “does”.

There is such thing as doe season in some states.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  Joe

Human hunting is only seasonal now.
It does NOT fill in all the ecological gaps left by the lack of wolves.

The food/ecology web is far more complex than most can imagine

Another Guest
Another Guest
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

Humans are the Most problematic creatures! Destroying everything as we over populate & take over the earth.

StoptheplanetIwantoff
StoptheplanetIwantoff
1 month ago
Reply to  Another Guest

That is why when the Singularity arrives, we will be wiped out.

Connie DobbsD
Connie Dobbs(@disqus_z3w956ss5l)
1 month ago

I just figure I got left behind.

onrust
onrust
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

Yeah, now if we could just get rid of these stupid-assed Republicans who understand nothing and bitch about everything, TSTL.

Connie DobbsD
Connie Dobbs(@disqus_z3w956ss5l)
1 month ago
Reply to  onrust

Whiners are a drag.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  onrust

Bunch a whiny neo-snowflakes

What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
What a shame to kill a beautiful critter.
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

Not having wolves is why the Mountain Lion numbers are up. Both wolves and Mountain Lions feed on deer. Bastard deer eat all my apples and garden greens.

Nooo
Nooo
1 month ago

Protect your orchards from deer like you’d protect yourself from mountain lions. A bit of understanding of nature of the wild animal, a bit of caution up front about exposing them to food you supply and maintenance does wonders.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
1 month ago
Reply to  Nooo

Yeah…anyone around here should know the virtues of having an 8′ garden fence.
Will keep most deer out with having a dog.
Add a dog and a 6′ fence is usually sufficient.
The more comfortable the deer are the higher a fence they will leap.

Connie DobbsD
Connie Dobbs(@disqus_z3w956ss5l)
1 month ago
Reply to  Dillon

That’s life in the food chain.

c u 2morrowD
c u 2morrow(@cu2morrow)
1 month ago

would any of us wanna die this way ?

Mr. BearD
Mr. Bear(@disqus_yuvjd9erak)
1 month ago
Reply to  c u 2morrow

Hit by a car? Seems like a dumb question