California Launches High Speed Internet Project

Kid with internet mapFacebook post by Senator Mike McGuire:

California is launching the largest high speed internet project in American history.

This historic initiative will help bridge the digital divide and provide reliable and affordable internet access to millions of unserved and underserved residents.

The bottom line is this: The pandemic shined a spotlight on the massive disparities that exist in California’s small towns, urban cities and rural counties when it comes to the lack of reliable internet activity.

This is why the State is moving with speed to deploy projects throughout California, now, and in the coming months.

The first 18 projects were recently announced, including 80 miles of critical high speed internet fiber that will be developed in Lake County along Highways 20, 175 & 29.
This initial project in Lake County will be the first of several more that will be announced for the North Coast – and other regions in the Golden State – in the coming year and we couldn’t be more excited.

So many have worked so incredibly hard to move this massive infrastructure project forward. Grateful for the partnership of Assemblymembers Aguair-Curry, Wood, Quirk-Silva and Speaker Rendon along with Senators Gonzalez & President Atkins and Governor Newsom.

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77 Comments
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grey fox
grey fox(@greyfox6845)
2 months ago

We rely so much on the internet. The net shuts down everything shuts down. Society should never have become so dependent on The Matrix….

laura cooskey
laura cooskey
2 months ago
Reply to  grey fox

Yep. I know i’m just dreaming on philosophical ideals, and this is not a constructive comment. But when people worry about internet inequity or the horrors of a post-apocalyptic no-net world, i think that’s the last thing that the gov’t-wealth powers would let happen. They’ve found the ultimately addictive division, control, and dependence tool, and it’s absolutely as important for them that the peons have it as the royalty. It’ll be the one remaining service blathering on when that whimper occurs.
Gil Scott-Heron said, “The revolution will not be televised.” No, more like celebrated, contorted, perverted, and revised via billions of tiny screens, ad infinitum, ad nauseam.

Antiwoke
Antiwoke
2 months ago
Reply to  grey fox

I totally agree with you.

Mega me
Mega me
2 months ago

I’d rather see star link subsidized than see billions of dollars blown on burying cable Internet . Why don’t you focus on spending billions on burying power lines so the god damned state doesn’t almost burn to the ground every summer?

TJay
TJay
2 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

if its done right, they should be able to do both at the same time. Since fiber doesn’t care about being in close proximity to power. The major hurdle over the years has been getting permits with the environmental restrictions, to bury the lines.

While i like the concept of starlink, the fact is that its really just considered a backbone/delivery medium poses many problems still for rural customers. Because they are required to have a regional groundstation for routing/entry onto the internet. Starlink does not actually provide any ISP related services in the typical sense. Which is part of the reason that there are limits for whoe can get accounts based on subscriber capacity of those regional groundstations that provide the true ISP services. (ISP services include customer support, email and other content delivery resources, and the required by law accounting services for addressing things like piracy and warrants).

Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  TJay

How does it get from the ground stations to the customers?

Existing towers? Cable?

Sounds like no extra service, just the ability to monopolize?

TJay
TJay
2 months ago
Reply to  Guest

Most likely cables, via fiber to backbone provider. But they can also be microwave links. Humboldt until about 2003 was primarily connected to the bay area telephone interconnect via a microwave link. So for a starlink user to get on the internet the simplified path is like this. Customer –> starlink router/dish —-> satellite —> ground station —> internet. Reverse that path to communicate the other direction. Hopefully that makes sense.

Musks reasoning for having starlink require groundstations. Is due to the varying legal requirements to operate ISP’s in the different parts of the world. Its next to impossible to meet all the requirements across Europe and Africa, and other less connected areas. Without doing it this way. So basically starlink function purely as a transport medium, and the final requirements are met in the regions as required by law. By companies that are likely already experienced in operating within those legal requirements.

Guest
Guest
2 months ago
Reply to  TJay

Gotcha.

Prof. QuizD
Prof. Quiz(@profquiz)
2 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

I agree BUT – there’s something to this notion of MAN MADE climate change”

Ex-college professor charged with setting California fires – ABC News

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/college-professor-charged-setting-california-fires-81264091

Antiwoke
Antiwoke
2 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

I fully agree. I’ve been saying the same thing. Star link. Why would they bother doing the fiber crap?
& Yes pg&e needs to bury their lines. This will always be forest no matter how much they cut.

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
2 months ago
Reply to  Antiwoke

Because fiber is much more stable and reliable, while it also uses far less electricity per terabyte transmitted.

Joe
Joe
2 months ago

What a bunch of idiots in our government. They all need to be taken out in the street and shot. Star link is the future.

North west
North west
2 months ago
Reply to  Joe

The future is here. My best friend has it and it’s simple to set up to.
Just set it outside pointing straight up

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  North west

Sure, but is it affordable?

Humboldt Lady
Humboldt Lady
2 months ago

Not too affordable. I was told $600 to start and $100 a month. Not happening in my world.

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  Humboldt Lady

Exactly, mine either. And let’s not mention the space junk. So, kind of a moot point for this article.

Last edited 2 months ago by Bug on a Windshield
Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
2 months ago
Reply to  Humboldt Lady

$499 for the equipment and $99/month.

It’s cheaper than the marginal satellite connection I’ve paid for for years now… faster and no data cap as well.

Nooo
Nooo
2 months ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Is it reliable in the wet, stormy weather?

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
2 months ago
Reply to  Nooo

It’s supposed to be. I’m supposed to get mine next month. I have been using a Starlink setup at a job site for about 6 months. It is way faster.

lol
lol
2 months ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Faster than 500 megabytes/sec?

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
2 months ago
Reply to  lol

No. Not in any of my speed tests. 70 was the fastest I tested… that compares to 0.5 to 10 right now through Viasat. I’d be happy with a consistent 15-20.

It is supposed to keep getting faster as they coat the sky with satellites and, supposedly, they are projecting gigabyte speeds when it’s all up.

I’d rather do dial up than have they sky marred by space shit, but here we are.

Data Bit Billy
Data Bit Billy
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Uh.. dial up… remember how long it took just to send a 25mb graphic or audio file ??? OK, I see your statement was sarcastic, but dial up will never be a viable option

Data Bit Billy
Data Bit Billy
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

No data cap SO FAR… it might be subject to the AOL (oversubscription) Syndrome

thetallone
thetallone
2 months ago
Reply to  Joe

I’ve heard it’s glitchy.

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
2 months ago
Reply to  thetallone

The folks at the place I’ve been using it say it’s improved dramatically over the last 10 months with every launch. At first they couldn’t rely on it for zoom and such but now it works great… reportedly.

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Joe violence and advocating for violence is Never a solution. Get over your tantrum and grow up. Nothing is as clear or simple or easy as you likely require to understand however it only takes patience and willingness to learn on your part to see that this is a complicated technology and yes there’s a lot of work to do. It’s going to get done faster than we think even with the many regulations to incorporate. I hope it helps having finally gotten voice cell service in my neck of the woods 5 yrs ago. Makes a big difference. We used to drive 8 miles to get a signal.
So yeah let’s speed it up.
Good work Maguire👍

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
2 months ago
Reply to  Joe

Any idea what happens to satellite microwave communications during solar incursions (storms), Joe?

Starlink is another good tool to have in the tool box but it is NOT the final perfect solution.
The idea that “starlink IS the future” is just more of Musk’s smoke blown up yer ass.

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
2 months ago
Reply to  Non-fiction

The advantage Starlink has is a lot of redundancy. An CME may shut down some satellites but it won’t take out all of them. My Viasat is reliant on a single point of failure.

HotCoffee
HotCoffee
2 months ago

Deep Dive
Flying taxis, hyperloops and driverless cars: Is it too early to start planning for future mobility?Plans for flashy, futuristic modes of transport distract from simpler solutions for today, critics say, but Miami, Orlando and Pittsburgh are not deterred.

https://www.smartcitiesdive.com/news/smart-transportation-flying-taxis-hyperloops-long-range-planning/609454/

Editor’s note: This story is part of Smart Cities Dive’s “Reassessing the smart cities movement” multipart series, which provides a look into the past, present and future of the space.

Last edited 2 months ago by HotCoffee
Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Planning? Heck, I think you mean, starting production. I know this quote is from just a sitcom, but it stands true all the same. Red, the father figure, on That 70s Show once said, “Where’s my hover car? They said we’d be driving hover cars by now.” We’ve been planning forever.

On a production note, a company in China recently demo’ed a two passenger octo-copter drone taxi. So, you know, hover cars.

Last edited 2 months ago by Bug on a Windshield
Data Bit Billy
Data Bit Billy
1 month ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

Flying cars is something I hope to NEVER see… people can’t figure out how to operate in a 2 dimensional plane (forward, back + left, right) and merge on a freeway without getting into a road rage incident.

adding a 3red dimension (up, down) would be a disaster.: road rage becomes sky rage, sky by shootings, and in a car if you run out of gas, you try to park on the side of a road, but when flying objects run out of gas… guess what happens ???

(PS… I used to be a pilot)

A name
A name
2 months ago

Remember about 20 years ago when we gave billions to the telecom companies to provide us high speed internet and not only did that never happen, but they started charging service fees to the tune of billions more to subsidize the building of this infrastructure that they never built and already were given the money for? I’m sure this time will be different.

HotCoffee
HotCoffee
2 months ago
Reply to  A name

You mean like Jerry Brown’s railcar to nowhere and the water bonds we passed?
Gavin was planing smart cities back when he was SF mayor, it was mostly AI tech for surveillance on every street.

Last edited 2 months ago by HotCoffee
Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  HotCoffee

How’s that AI surveillance working in China? Depends on who their government let’s you ask.

Last edited 2 months ago by Bug on a Windshield
Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  A name

That was the deal agreed to. The tech companies got billions to build the infrastructure for franchising the hi speed internet and charging us for getting digits thru a wire we paid for.
That was what was ” negotiated” by congress.
Yeah capitalism sucks.

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

And they built it in all the cities not district 12 or our remote province of stumps.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Congress is what sucks, not capitalism…

Non-fiction
Non-fiction
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

Pure capitalism is predatory and one of blights of and on human existence.

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

No country Joe. It’s capitalism that bought congress to give you and me the illusion that policies are the problem.
Reality is that everything we see and do is the result of a capitalists
Private Business Plan.
Congress is a capitalists business plan.
It’s how USA was founded.
By capitalists.
That’s why everyone is drugged up on shopping, religion, sex, TV, sports and gratuitous violence.
And mis information also known as propaganda.
Capitalists and their system is the problem.

The Real Brian
The Real Brian(@brianroman911)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

It’s terrible how many side effects of capitalism is destroying us.

People blame everything but capitalism too, as you’re seeing.

There is something out there that we haven’t tried.

It wont be any one system that saves. I dont subscribe to totalitism.

Thanks smoky, for some good comments.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Capitalism is a great thing. It offers a wealth of benefits to the people that live under its reign. It allows you to have choices, work hard, and improve your circumstances. It doesn’t have a level playing field for all participants, but that is part of its beauty.

You can start off on the lower end of the ladder and work your way up. Alternatively, if you aren’t smart financially, you can easily start at the top and fall down too.

But at the end of the day, it allows for doors to be open and for you to strive for and be exactly what you want, no questions asked.
Capitalism Promotes Freedom.
Capitalism Allows For OpportunityCapitalism Promotes Hard Work

lol
lol
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

No it’s capitalism.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  lol

Any suggestions for an alternate and successful system…

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago

“… provide reliable and affordable internet …”

Fantastic. We’re paying $30-35 for one of AT&Ts slowest speeds. We can’t stream. Zoom is basically a series of snapshots. On the upside, lack of Zoom got me out out jury duty. Banking or shopping online? Buffer, buffer, processing, connecting . . . We’re sorry, your request timed out. TV? No, we don’t get that channel and it’s worse when it rains.

How are they going to do this? High speed is already out there. The infrastructure is in place. Subsidize and make it affordable. Yes, I know a lot of rural areas get less than we do, so, yeah, build up or beam in for them. But C’mon, really, how in the bejezzuz is some grand new scheme going to cost me less?

HotCoffee
HotCoffee
2 months ago

I have HughesNet, slow but reliable.
No cell phone service available in this area.
Use Wireless landline.

Last edited 2 months ago by HotCoffee
Bozo
Bozo
2 months ago

Translation: You ain’t gonna get it.

Tony
Tony(@4515571471814092)
2 months ago

I have AT&T and it works great.

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  Tony

In town

Angela Robinson
Angela Robinson(@arobbie1956)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Yeah, AT&T really sucks. Cell phones really changed communication on the ocean for commercial fishermen. (Anyone remember the marine operator and your conversation being broadcast across the fleet? Or trying to remember which secret code you used to talk to your running partners over the radio?)

Anyway, AT&T decided they didn’t need to really serve the folks out on the ocean. We, and several other boats complained. “Tough shit” basically was their response. So we and others tried to leave AT&T and switch to Verizon (which does service out to the west). AT&T said “Nope, we won’t let you out of your contract even though we are useless to you”.

So we carried both companies for a year. AT&T sucks!

C JD
C J(@disqus_jmplgn2ci7)
2 months ago
Reply to  Tony

Same here. Used AT&T for over 15 years. Not crazy fast but it works great for me and the Suddenlink guys never understand why I don’t want to switch when they come knocking.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago

I fired AT&T years ago and have used 101Netlink ever since…I’m a happy camper and it’s a local business…

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

For how long though? I used to have Humboldt Internet. Where are they now?

The Real Brian
The Real Brian(@brianroman911)
2 months ago

This should thrill anti maskers.

We’re actually trying to be more like Sweden, with it’s best of the world Gov provided internet which allows everyone to work from home, pre Covid.

Local resident
Local resident
2 months ago

Cheers to the fall of Suddenlink. Pure and blatant robbery!

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
2 months ago
Reply to  Local resident

Yeah, maybe so. But, now AT&T can raise the rate of the crappy service I’m getting. Six of one, half dozen of another I suppose.

mlr the giant squirrel in Eureka
mlr the giant squirrel in Eureka
2 months ago

How can Oakland still be without high speed internet?

Don T MattaD
Don T Matta(@donmatta)
2 months ago

I have a Fiber Optic line literally right across the street from where I live!!! AT&T refuses to give ANY access to it because there are so few people out here on Hwy 36!!! Am I the only one who sees absolutely NO sense in that exuse???

Jim’s Guest Is Someone Else’s Wife
Jim’s Guest Is Someone Else’s Wife
2 months ago
Reply to  Don T Matta

We’re from the Government. We’re here to help and make your life easier.

Where can I wager some money that this will be another boondoggle costing the taxpayers billions?

High speed rail ring a bell?

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago

Hi speed rail has constantly and repeatedly been lobbied against and shut down by the oil companies every single time.
That’s why BART never was allowed originally to extend to Marin Sonoma.
And that’s why when the first rail initiative got on the Marin Sonoma ballot to put BART elevated in the middle of the 101 corridor up to Cloverdale. Oil companies at the time reportedly spent most $$$ in state history up to that time to swing the vote NO.
Instead we got 6 effing lanes down there and the anemic and dangerous consolation train! For twice as much money with no connection to the actual bay area!!
Yeah capitalism is not good for us.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

The problem is corrupt, establishment politicians, not capitalism…

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

Wrong again Joe. The system of corrupt establishment politicians is the system CAPITALISM created. Not the other way around as you keep stating.
No reformation is possible.

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Well we disagree…In my humble opinion, all America had to do was follow President Trump’s plan to drain the DC sewer of all the corrupt, establishment, feckless and pandering politicians. Then add term limits. Trump forced them to work and stopped the Pork, so they made it their mission to hobble his presidency with lies and misinformation 24/7… Dirty politicians destroy everything they touch…

Don T MattaD
Don T Matta(@donmatta)
2 months ago
Reply to  Country Joe

Actually it’s Both!!!

Country Joe
Country Joe(@powmia1971)
2 months ago
Reply to  Don T Matta

You’re on to something Don…

Don T MattaD
Don T Matta(@donmatta)
2 months ago

It’s NOT the Gubmint that the problem here it’s AT&T GREED pure & simple!!! They were paid to bring the Fiber line down from Southern Trinity down to 101 for a “Redundant Backup” it’s still NOT being used AFAIK still after several years of being completed!!!

VMG
VMG
2 months ago

Starlink.

Beats ATT, MediaCom and all the other expensive and poor quality cable systems…

320 Down, 20 Up

Last edited 2 months ago by VMG
None today
None today
2 months ago
Reply to  VMG
Mendocino Mamma
Mendocino Mamma
2 months ago

Mmmm ok. Even in our largest cities service is bad. The buildings block signals. Manhattan, San Francisco, Chicago. Try and use and wifi or a cell phone on lower Whacker? Good effing luck. Mountains and valleys block signals too. Many remote areas are without electricity, phone or wifi in California. MIT instructor bans computers and phones in classes…use your brains. Its a lofty goal, but is it truly needed?

Starlink Rocks
Starlink Rocks
2 months ago

We have star link I,m using it to post this .Supper fast upload and download . A gamer’s delight. Very easy to install set it on the ground and it points itself 99 dollars a month unlimited. $499 for dish and wireless router that can handle 70 people connecting at once. The cell phone co’s are already connected to starlink and use it’s network when they get bogged down, Starlink says it’s up to the cell co’s to disclose who is using starlink. Our install of 101 netlink cost hundreds more with equipment and tree climber and it’s way slower and costs way more.

thetallone
thetallone
2 months ago
Reply to  Starlink Rocks

How consistently reliable is it? (I like my supper fast, too.)
I wonder if it will stay great when it has lots more users.

Last edited 2 months ago by thetallone
Starlink Rocks
Starlink Rocks
2 months ago

Star links ISP is space x in the bay area

lol
lol
2 months ago

So the citizens are going to pay to build the infrastructure, then they’re going to be charged for the service by a private company?

Mendocino Mamma
Mendocino Mamma
2 months ago
Reply to  lol

Not everyone can afford the privilege of that. You willing to share with your neighbors

C JD
C J(@disqus_jmplgn2ci7)
2 months ago

So what will the infrastructure be? DSL won’t work because its signal slows the farther from the phone company you get.

Suddenlink sounds fast until everyone hopes on then the massively shared bandwidth gives you a smaller and smaller slice of bandwidth the more people hope online.

Satellite is more expensive than land lines, not sure how reliable it is during bad weather.

People live in rural communities for a reason and they usually understand that they will not have all the same amenities that people in urban areas will.

Where’s the concern over cell phone service not reaching many rural areas? That is just another issue of choosing to live in rural areas.

Last edited 2 months ago by C J
Data Bit Billy
Data Bit Billy
1 month ago

High speed fiber is GREAT… BUT… it’s the ‘LAST MILE’ that REALLY counts. High speed fiber lines are like the main ‘trunk lines’ of data but it’s the ‘last mile’, the actual connection at people’s homes that really counts.

Fiber optic lines running along major highway corridors also does nothing to help those who do not live in a ‘town’, much of us are a dispersed population, out in the mountains, nowhere near a “town” or a village.

We have to pay very high prices For Exede or Hughes (They lease you the equipment).

If you live in an area where you can get a wireless DSL data connection, YOU HAVE TO SPEND SEVERAL HUNDRED DOLLARS TO PURCHASE THE EQUIPMENT.

I’d like to see a state program like this actually benefit us folks out in the deep boonies. Folks that live in or near villages or towns can have centralized learning centers for kids, but individual households in the deep boonies do not have this.

THE SOLUTION: cheaper satellite internet service

Martin
Martin
1 month ago

Just great, now we can get all the government BS quicker!!!