Department of Cannabis Control Marks 100 Days as a New State Department

California cannabis featureInformation from California’s Department of Cannabis Control (DCC):

…California’s Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) marks its first 100 days as a new state department. In this short time, DCC has already taken significant steps to deliver on the Newsom Administration’s commitments to support California cannabis businesses and improve the cannabis regulatory framework.

“We’ve made meaningful early progress as a new department, but this is only the beginning,” said Nicole Elliott, DCC Director. “DCC will continue to direct significant effort to building a safe, sustainable and equitable cannabis market, including by engaging with all stakeholders, improving access to licensure, and streamlining and simplifying the regulatory framework.”

Below are some of DCC’s major accomplishments during its first 100 days as a state department:

What we’ve done
  • Launched $100 million local grant program, informed by meetings and input from 17 eligible jurisdictions, to support the transition of businesses into annual licensure by funding completion of local and environmental reviews
  • Consolidated three sets of regulations into one, reducing duplicative and conflicting cannabis business regulations, aligning core application requirements and allowing business-to-business trade samples
  • Toured more than 20 licensed cannabis businesses representing all license types, with direct engagement between the licensees and newly-appointed DCC leadership team

    Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) and Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency (BCSH) leaders at 515 Broadway, a licensed cannabis retailer and equity program participant, located in Sacramento, California. From left to right: Lila Mirrashidi, BCSH Deputy Secretary of Business and Consumer Relations Lourdes Castro Ramírez, BCSH Secretary Nicole Elliott, DCC Director Juan Ordaz, DCC Supervising Special Investigator Richard Parrott, DCC Deputy Director of Compliance Photo credit: Department of Cannabis Control

    Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) and Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency (BCSH) leaders. From left to right: Lila Mirrashidi, BCSH Deputy Secretary of Business and Consumer Relations, Lourdes Castro Ramírez, BCSH Secretary, Nicole Elliott, DCC Director, Juan Ordaz, DCC, Supervising Special Investigator, Richard Parrott, DCC Deputy Director of Compliance, Photo credit: Department of Cannabis Control

  • Transitioned hundreds of provisional licenses to annual licenses, recently issuing the 3,000th annual license
  • Reviewed 140 standard operating procedures and 100 method validations submitted by applicants for testing laboratory licenses
  • Served or assisted on 118 search warrants targeting unlicensed activity resulting in seizure or destruction of more than 71,751 pounds of cannabis and cannabis product worth nearly $121.6 million, eradication of 273,326 plants, and seizure of $655,000 in cash and 14 firearms; this also includes focused efforts in Mendocino County, Siskiyou County and the Southern California high desert region to support enforcement against water diversions
  • Completed ISO 17025 pre-assessment for California’s state-run cannabis testing laboratory
  • Merged organizational structure of the three programs into one, creating singular points of contact for stakeholders forging DCC’s strategic plan and unified culture, and developing the organization’s mission, vision and values
  • Named permanent and transitionary leadership team
  • Relaunched cannabis.ca.gov with expanded state cannabis information
Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) leaders tour Divine Pines Farm, a licensed small outdoor cultivator in Grass Valley, California. From left to right: Christina Dempsey, DCC Acting Deputy Director of External Affairs Jim Moe, Divine Pines Farm Rasha Salama, DCC Chief Deputy Director Photo credit: Nevada County Cannabis Alliance

Department of Cannabis Control (DCC) leaders tour Divine Pines Farm, a licensed small outdoor cultivator in Grass Valley, California. From left to right: Christina Dempsey, DCC Acting Deputy Director of External Affairs, Jim Moe, Divine Pines Farm, Rasha Salama, DCC Chief Deputy Director, Photo credit: Nevada County Cannabis Alliance

Where we’re going

DCC is conducting an assessment of all processes and procedures that were in place under the former cannabis programs, with an aim to maintain the best of each former program, further enhance stakeholder engagement and support applicants and licensees. A subset of this work is the aligning the inspection programs for the entire supply chain; DCC is building toward a robust routine inspection program that enhances compliance and accountability for all businesses.
Over the next year, DCC anticipates taking multiple, comprehensive regulatory actions to further simplify and enhance the cannabis regulatory framework. This includes regulations to implement fee waivers for equity applicants and licensees, which will be released within the next 45 days. DCC anticipates ongoing, direct engagement with equity applicants and licensees to better understand their unique needs and challenges.
DCC is deepening partnerships with local and state partners, including to support licensing, compliance, enforcement and equity programs. Through DCC, the state will continue to offer support and technical assistance for local governments, creating pathways for businesses to participate in the licensed, legal marketplace.
Our This is California Cannabis campaign, which promotes the benefits of licensure, will expand during the next six months to include retailers and manufacturers, in addition to cultivators. Additional education and support for businesses to remain compliant post-licensure will be released within the next year.
DCC and the Newsom Administration will make additional appointments over the coming months to fill top leadership and advisory roles. DCC also anticipates ongoing recruitments to fill vacant positions throughout the department. This hiring will support the development of infrastructure necessary to support the department in meeting its mission and fulfilling its mandates.
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41 Comments
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Fredm
Fredm
1 month ago

All they had to do was limit the amount of acres of cultivation to match demand… instead they are still permitting more and more every day.. it’s a joke.

All the work out planning department, supervisors, local growers alliance, Cdfw, water board etc did.. all for nothing. 3 or 4 Humboldt farms will survive. It’s over, the fat lady has sung. There is zero reason the price of cannabis will go back above the cost of production in Humboldt. Next year 50% won’t plant, the following year 95%….

Mr. Bear
1 month ago
Reply to  Fredm

Why would a government limit competition? That’s for the market to sort out

Farce
Farce
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Bear

Yes- and that’s what this is. The Big Sort-Out. It won’t be sorted by next year. I feel sorry for anybody paying mortgages still. Do not be optimistic- that is my advice. Many mega-grows have not even begun producing yet and they will continue. Heck- they get to write off the losses on their profits coming from another arm of their organization! Do you get to do that? No. For most of us it’s a real loss- not an accounting write-off. And that’s why corporations will destroy us all. And when you voted for “legalization” you invited them all in. This was the inevitable end game of that wonderful corporate-written and corporate-pushed “legalization” that they sold to you as “freedom”. You gave it all away. Enjoy the fruits of the seeds you sowed…

I like stars
I like stars
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

Farce hit the nail on the head.

Fredm
Fredm
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Bear

Sure.. why even have government at all. Let corporations take over, privatize schools and prisons, screw it let’s privatize police.

We don’t let free markets control anything… and if we did we would all work for crap wages and live in a very diff place.

Equity
Equity
1 month ago

How do you apply for the fee waiver “equity application”? Is this the same program as the county equity grant or does the state have a separate program?

Something smells funny
Something smells funny
1 month ago
Reply to  Equity

Grow 5 acres. Get an expensive consultant.

Farce
Farce
1 month ago

Loo at the smiles on those faces! Full-time and well-paid government jobs with benefits galore, retirement pensions, paid vacations- and all on your dime! The government will always get paid and they will always make you pay. It doesn’t matter if you get paid or if you lose everything. THEY will make you pay! But then they have done such a wonderful job haven’t they? Roping in a sea of believers while they did everything to deliver the industry into the hands of the already-wealthy corporate entities that rule our country. Sure glad we “legalized” and now are “safe” and ” free”!!
They are from the government and they are here to help us…

The Real Brian
The Real Brian (@brianroman911)
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

What did you ever do for me?

Or Ca?

Get a grip Farce. They aren’t there to rub your back and make you smile.

You made a fortune to some on a black market, quit sniveling at others for your losses.

The Real Brian
The Real Brian (@brianroman911)
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

What did you ever do for me?

Or Ca?

Get a grip Farce. They aren’t there to rub your back and make you smile.

You made a fortune to some on a black market drug economy, untaxed and unregulated, quit sniveling at others for your losses.

Start critiquing yourself bud.

Farce
Farce
1 month ago
Reply to  The Real Brian

Wow- you have really descended into quite the hole there. I’ve got a grip, thank you. I’m not sniveling…even though i never “made a fortune”. Because I never wanted to “make a fortune”. That was never the goal. I appreciated the chance to work hard and earn a rural lifestyle, even buy a piece of land and build my own small house. Other than that it was all about healing the land and helping others. It was a great opportunity that is almost totally lost for the serfs in our present-day America. Who gets to climb up from the gutter and earn enough to buy a piece of land and build a modest house anymore? Not hardly anybody. You are on a track to fascist ideology between your authoritarian mandatory vax spiels and now your embrace of the dominant corporate paradigm. What happened to you, man? Everybody now loses their shirt except for the regulatory agencies and you like that?! Look at your neighbors- the little ones, not the mega-turds and have a little sympathy before it’s too late…

The Real Brian
The Real Brian (@brianroman911)
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

I’m not a fan of CA’s handling if Cannabis.

But I said so many years ago, because it was literally inevitable in any possible, that all this was to be.

It is not the DCCs fault, it is 100 days old.

You. Me. Our neigbors. This community. Capitalism. Human nature.

WE DID THIS.

If you don’t know how you cant use an objective lens.

ILoveplants
ILoveplants
1 month ago

Here is my 2 cents: the taxes and fees associated with cultivation are currently based on $1000+ a pound. Legal is now going for $500. IMO, the fees should be on a sliding scale, based on market value. This would motivate county and hold them accountable to hold up their end of the bargain and go after more illegal grows than the measly 26 cites they eradicated this year, most of them medical grows, 6 plant grows, and people in the process. The sliding scale would also ease the burden on the grower and put more $ in his pocket. Since they are over regulating and over taxing the permitee, they need to do their part to keep prices high. BOS is going after the little guy while the illegal mega grows continue to produce tonnage, unscathed. My only conclusion for this is that it’s hot during the summer, and it’s a lot of work to cut down a big grow. They can eradicate a small garden in 15 minutes, hence allowing them to do multiple gardens in a day. It looks good on paper, but the laziness of only going after small grows does nothing to reduce production on… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by ILoveplants
Fredm
Fredm
1 month ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

It’s all peanuts compared to the huge mega grows permitted around the state. Taxes are way too high, but not as big of an issue as the 10x over supply. Stick a fork in southern Humboldt… only ranchers, loggers and retirees left in a few years.

Farce
Farce
1 month ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

Pounds in southern Oregon for $250

Smoky OG again
Smoky OG again
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

Schwag in Southern Oregon 🤣🤣🤣🤣

Farce
Farce
1 month ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Yes. Our top grade is always better. Take Soregon price and add X= Humboldt price. Brokers know that too

Jim Dogger
Jim Dogger
1 month ago
Reply to  Smoky OG again

Super dank in Northern Sonoma

ILoveplants
ILoveplants
1 month ago
Reply to  Farce

🤦

Dude humboldt was abated
Dude humboldt was abated
1 month ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

Dude its not some tiny ma n pa grow in the hills in humboldt county affecting your prices 😂 ,and Humboldt county was actually very effectively abated of very small and large grows over several years.

ILoveplants
ILoveplants
1 month ago

I think you mis understood my comment.

thetallone
thetallone
1 month ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

Yeah but the taxes should be on earned income, money that actually comes in, like every other business, instead of this permit thing, where you have to buy a pricey “ticket” to play the game.

ILoveplants
ILoveplants
1 month ago
Reply to  thetallone

Agreed

Perspective
Perspective
1 month ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

Are you high on glue?? Take away every last “illegal” gram in CA and there would still be a MASSIVE over supply. Traditional gardens are not the problem.

ILoveplants
ILoveplants
1 month ago
Reply to  Perspective

That’s true.. the juice ain’t worth the squeeze no more

Ullr Rover
Ullr Rover
1 month ago

Power to the State! We need more administrative overlords.

Dan Fuller
Dan Fuller (@5116640448352602)
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullr Rover

Ya right, like we NEED more holes in our collective heads for the “Gubmint” to pour in more CRAP!!!

Panthera Onca
Panthera Onca
1 month ago

So history will record that less than 100 days after the BCC became a “state” dept. the cannabis market collapsed. Great work.

Farce
Farce
1 month ago
Reply to  Panthera Onca

Ha ha! I never want to deflect criticism from this government agency but… The biggest overproduction is happening in Oregon. Yes this agency is blowing it big time in California… But they have no control over Oregon other than to file complaints with the federal government

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
1 month ago

They are 320 days too early for a celebration.

Legallettuce
Legallettuce
1 month ago

Sign, sign
Everywhere a sign
Blockin’ out the scenery
Breakin’ my mind
Do this, don’t do that
Can’t you read the sign?

Now, hey you, mister, can’t you read?
You got to have a shirt and tie to get a seat
You can’t even watch, no, you can’t eat
You ain’t supposed to be here

The sign said, “You’ve got to have a membership card
To get inside”

https://mjbizdaily.com/growth-tops-2022-cannabis-business-priorities-for-mjbizcon-attendees/

Bug on a Windshield
Bug on a Windshield
1 month ago

When vehicles and homes are seized by local, state, and feds, they are later auctioned to the public. See where I’m going with this?

Can you imagine the pace of the auctioneer’s speech at that auction?

Last edited 1 month ago by Bug on a Windshield
Farce
Farce
1 month ago

Federal “legalization” will be the final nail in the coffin of the mom n pop entrepeneur. And for smaller companies. The federal eradication of unlicensed grows will be draconian- scooping up of properties through IRS audits going back years. Many who now think they are “clean” will be shocked. Shocked that the government never cared about small producers or the little people. But they haven’t- neither political party gives a hoot about anything less than corporate-level control, massive consolidation and don’t ever doubt that. “They don’t care about you”- George Carlin…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fT03vCaL-F0

Guess
Guess
1 month ago

Days? It should say inches!

The Real Brian
The Real Brian (@brianroman911)
1 month ago

I’ve been trying to find out if the Lev Parnas scheme came into Ca or Humboldt, Trinity.

Just found this, incase anyone is interested;

https://amp.sacbee.com/news/california/california-weed/article246311690.html

Good Ole Days
Good Ole Days
1 month ago
Reply to  E=mc2

Interesting that the main concern in this article appears to be the many illegal businesses that still exist i.e. pot shops ect…. when every cultivator In the legal game up here that I know is VERY concerned about the amount of cannabis being grown! That is above all else why most of us will not be able to keep in the legal game!Tooooo much product and tooooo many expenses equals a big minus on the profit side 😞😡

Last edited 1 month ago by Good Ole Days
Legallettuce
Legallettuce
1 month ago
Reply to  Good Ole Days

That’s not what I got from the article. Seemed as if the issue is not enough retail outlets to help push the branded corporate product with only 500+ dispensaries. Their all into this vertical shit spending millions on indoor grows and distribution in desert locations. The other method to get product to consumers is delivery. Delivery is let’s just say able to get their own brands, lol. Lastly, theirs always “the dude” who is not always timely but got some dank bud and he/she don’t sell corporate brands. That pretty much sums up the CA market. War is hell, lol.

Legallettuce
Legallettuce
1 month ago
derp
derp
1 month ago

Nadaine Delapp is drooling for any position up in this.

Louise
Louise
1 month ago

100 days of working from home? And state bennies to boot.