The North Coast Asks Questions at Senator McGuire’s Climate Crisis Town Hall

Stylized image created from a photo taken March 2019 of a protest in Arcata. [Photo by Mark McKenna]

Stylized image created from a photo taken March 2019 of a protest in Arcata. [Photo by Mark McKenna]

On Wednesday, California’s Second District Senator Mike McGuire moderated a discussion on California’s climate change problems where Humboldt County and the North Coast region were given specific attention. Questions were read aloud by McGuire in the live town hall forum on Zoom while it streamed in real time on YouTube. The panel specifically addressed local concerns about dwindling fog, fire management, and also dug into related California-centered climate concerns.

McGuire set the stage by welcoming viewers and framing the discussion, saying, “I want to be candid here tonight – the alarm could not be louder. Climate change is here, the evidence is clear and the impacts are dangerous. Experts believe that climate change has made California and the American west warmer and drier over the last twenty to thirty years.”

Screengrab of McGuire introducing a submitted question from Bayside, Humboldt County on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.

Screengrab of McGuire introducing a submitted question from Bayside, Humboldt County on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021 at his Climate Town Hall.

The town hall panelists included three experts, each specializing in climate change and the infrastructure involved. The Climate Crisis Town Hall featured experts Daniel Swain, Climate Scientist with the Institute of the Environment & Sustainability at UCLA, along with Kristina Dahl, who is a Senior Climate Scientist for the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Peter Miller, who is the Director of The Western Region Climate & Clean Energy Program which is based in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Foggy morning

Foggy morning. [Photo by Kym Kemp]

One element of nature that Humboldt County residents are familiar with is the regular presence of fog – on the rivers, in the trees, over the Humboldt Bay and all other inlets from the Pacific into the various crevices punctuating our rugged coastline. As many longtime residents have noted, the Humboldt fog seems to be disappearing, a foreboding change to the climate relied on by Sequoia Sempervirens from Santa Cruz to northern California through Humboldt County to the Oregon coastline to northern Washington State.

“Peter, we’ve been getting questions from folks who live in San Francisco, who live up in Bayside in Humboldt County, who live in Bodega Bay in Sonoma County, about fog. All of these questions are related to – each of these individuals believe that they’re seeing less fog than they did twenty years ago – all long term residents of San Francisco up in Bayside, as well as in Bodega Bay.”

McGuire continued, “The question is, for example, from Gregory, ‘Will Bay Area fog survive climate change, or is it anticipated that it’s gonna cease?’ …And then we hear from James and Ileana – ‘We’ve noticed after twenty plus years in our home town in Big Lagoon in Humboldt County, that we have less frequent fog, and it’s drier than it once was.’ So, Peter, talk to us about this debate on the North Coast, famous for its fog. What happens to it with climate change?”

Peter Miller replied, “In general, the models are suggesting that we’re going to see a migration northward of climate zones. So, the Bay Area will look more like central California, Northern California, Humboldt, will look more like the Bay Area, and over time we’re going to see a hotter, drier climate on the coast.” He went on to acknowledge that locals who have a long memory of local weather patterns, perhaps spanning several decades may notice this change, but that these accumulate over time and “will be punctuated by some of these extreme events that we are seeing now.”

Miller specifically explained that fog is particularly delicate and important to the coastline. He explained that down the line, “there is growing concern about ocean current patterns – particularly in the Atlantic, but also in other parts of the world. Fog is highly dependent on the current ocean currents that we have in California. If these change, we’re going to see a substantial impact on fog and other conditions in northern California.”

McGuire posed a viewer question about regional climate changes that would affect the Emerald counties, asking Daniel Swain, “What does it look like over the next twenty to thirty years, when it comes to climate change on the way for the western United States?”

Swain replies, “So, the places in the west are pretty likely to get substantially wetter and some of the really dry places in the desert southwest- are more likely to get drier – so unfortunately, I don’t think that’s the pattern a lot of people would like to see. It’s going to amplify the differences between wet and dry regions, and the interesting thing about California is, it sort of spans very different climate zones. Northernmost part of California along the north coast has a climate more similar to the Pacific Northwest.”

[Photo by Mark McKenna]

Firefighters on the Knob Fire August 30. [Photo by Mark McKenna]

McGuire told the panel, “We are not joking, we’ve probably received three dozen questions tonight on wildfires, and how climate change is impacting the severity and the size of wildfires.”

Dahl replied, “They are all showing that they’re growing worse and that there’s a connection there to climate change. Here in California, the primary reason for that is that the climate is getting warmer and that is causing the vegetation to dry out. When that vegetation dries out it serves as fuel for the fires there ready to burn – when anytime there’s a spark. So there’s a distinct connection here in the west and in California between the warming climate, the aridity or the dryness of our vegetation, and the increase in wildfire size. So the fires that we’re experiencing this year, last year, the last few years that are larger than ever before. These are, you know, a hallmark case of how climate change is impacting the world around us.” Dahl also brought up the concern of fire and forest management processes as a contributing factor to the intensity of wildfires in California.

Swain added that in regard to fires in California, forest management is being overhauled. He explained, “Recently, you know Mike, my thinking is focused on decoupling wildfire from catastrophe because fire itself in the natural landscape is not a bad thing.” He said the consequences reaped by California’s forests are not only the result of changing weather patterns, but due to inadequate forest management practices. Swain explained, “In addition to climate change, why we’re having such severe wildfires in the forests in the American west and some other parts of the world, is that we totally removed the vast majority of those low intensity natural beneficial fires that would otherwise have come along and kept the forests at a thinner, healthier state.”

After an hour and forty-five minutes of “wonky” science-based discussion, Senator McGuire was the first to bring up the devastating impact that negligent corporate oversight has had on California’s residents.

Late in the meeting, McGuire was not mincing words when he described PG&E as a “convicted felon” in reference to the 2020 Zogg Fire which killed four Californians and burned 200 homes near Redding, and the tragic 2018 Camp Fire, which left 84 Paradise area residents dead and levelled the town.  PG&E was found guilty in the Camp Fire case

McGuire was pointed in describing the problem facing California’s infrastructure management. The Senator characterized Pacific Gas & Electric as a negligent contributor to the state’s energy issues. Addressing the 3,500 live viewers and the three panelists, McGuire said, “t [W]e have a utility here in Northern California that simply has under-invested in their infrastructure, and a convicted felon, if I could just be candid.”

The Eureka Co-op was open for limited hours during the October 26th-28th 2019 power outage, running a generator very selectively. There was no meat, seafood, cheese, dairy, deli, or hot soup to be had. (Photo by Ryan Hutson)

The Eureka Co-op, nearly shutdown, relying on a backup generator in October 2019 during an unscheduled power shutoff initiated by PG&E. [Photo by Ryan Hutson]

Dahl offered, “Yeah, well, there’s an incredible amount of deferred maintenance [with] utility companies throughout the country,” as she referenced the power grid complications and shortcomings in Texas, for example. She emphasized putting more focus on renewable sources of energy, and added, “Absolutely, we need to hold PG&E and other utility companies accountable for maintaining their infrastructure so that we can all be safe.”

When Senator McGuire asked the panel what is the “most important thing” that one person could do to reduce their impact on climate change at an individual level, Miller had a clear answer. “There’s a couple things. Miller explained, “[W]e need to transition our electricity generation from fossil fuels to clean electricity demand and solar. And then we need to take our homes, and our vehicles and we need to make them use electricity rather than fossil fuels, and run them off that clean electricity. That’s the number one thing we need to do.”

Dahl concurred with both Miller and Swain’s number one suggestion – to “electrify everything”. She stated, “Decarbonise, as we say – electrify – that transportation emissions so- that’s going to be something that we need to be incentivizing more and more as a state and as more and more electric cars come onto the market. Hopefully, we’ll start to see prices drop as well so that we don’t need such large subsidies from the state or federal government- to make those affordable…”

Miller emphasized, “California needs to do everything it can. People ask questions about ‘what would you be doing, A or B?’ You know, which one’s more important – the answer is there’s no “or”. It’s all hands on deck. We need to do everything we can to create a model that we can then bring to the rest of the world. A compelling, effective, affordable model for addressing the solution- addressing this crisis that’s upon us today.”

Students from Arcata High, NPA, HSU walked out of class in March 2019 as part of a global action to combat climate change.

Students from Arcata High, NPA, HSU walked out of class in March 2019 as part of a global action to combat climate change. [Photo by Mark McKenna]

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VMG
Guest
VMG
10 months ago

Well, Mike McGuire, Americans usually start whining about climate change just around the times when gasoline prices top $4.50/gallon…

Here is one of my favorite sources of “climate change”:

https://sacramento.craigslist.org/cto/d/vacaville-ws6-manual-6spd-trans-am/7391418140.html

YES! Those Tundras, those Silverados and Dodge Duallies, they are one of the causes!

For some reason, every single Californian thinks that they need their own personal SUV! Maybe they think they will be driving “to the snow”, but folks, the years where there has been significant snowfall, appear to have past us by…

Down in SF, all those techies have sold their Priuses to the UBER driver’s corps, and now, you see TESLAS!! Everywhere!

Damn, I sure as heck can’t afford a plug-in car that costs $70,000!

And all those wine grapes and Almond Trees and Pot Greenhouses… Not only can we not generate electricity from hydro, but we are nowhere near ready to charge up 10,000,000 electric cars or run LED’s for 500,000 plant indoor grows…

https://abc7news.com/bay-area-pot-bust-oakland-alameda-county-sheriffs-office/11066130/

The beginning of the end was all those plastic water tanks, which should have had been manufactured with RFID tags implanted so that the people who will come along later to clean up would be able to find them all…

Greed, blind foolishness, and wretched excess are difficult traits to remove from the population, but at the moment, people should be thinking about the outcome, and, just where in the heck they will live, when California is completely turned to desert…

People are still moving here from Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Dakota and Texas, but, Californians are looking around and then moving to the Oregon Coast, Washington State, and even, Idaho?

There’s no solution, Mike Mcguire, except conservation, using less water, and reducing pollution…

50 years into droughts, forests dying, and unchecked immigration, here we are, and it’s no wonder those chucklehead Christians are predicting that “it’s God’s punishment”…

Humans who won’t “do their part” will never have a workable plan, and face slow doom as Mother Nature closes in for the kill…

And politicians as poor quality as Mike McGuire, are no help at all…

stuber
Guest
stuber
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

170 million cars world wide produce 68,000 tons of pollution a year, and it gets less each year. 90,000 container/cargo ships produce 270 million tons of pollution a year. If, like we see the idiot protesters wearing, you buy crap from China and other filthy countries, you are the problem. If you buy a Tesla, you are the problem. And fuck Maguire, he and his progressive asshole buddies are the problem. They hurt the poor. They hurt all of us. Why do you idiot protestors listen to these liberal progressives? Don’t forget your Nikes!

Yeah,sure
Guest
Yeah,sure
10 months ago
Reply to  stuber

And your Trump hats and Ivanka’s line of shoes, clothes and purses.

fishkiller
Guest
fishkiller
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

It’s all the fault of those filthy unvaccinated! If we could just find a way to FORCE them to get stabbed……the planet will be happy once again.

???
Guest
???
10 months ago
Reply to  fishkiller

Climate change is the fault of the unvacciantd? How? Because most of them deny that climate change is caused by humans?

Willow Creeker
Guest
Willow Creeker
10 months ago
Reply to  fishkiller

Is everything about you’re identity of not getting the vaccine? Get over it man. No one cares.

Connie DobbsD
Member
Connie Dobbs
9 months ago
Reply to  fishkiller

You know, Gitmo’s just sitting there empty….

Mega me
Guest
Mega me
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

Did you know that diesel trucks get better mileage than gas trucks? Probably not . My 5.9 cummins gets 21 miles per gallon in the freeway while a Toyota Tacoma gets about 18.

Juanita
Guest
Juanita
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

My diesel Jetta (2003 model) still gets 50 mpg. ☺

Connie DobbsD
Member
Connie Dobbs
9 months ago
Reply to  Juanita

VW faked its emissions tests, [smug emoji]

Doin the right thing the wrong way?
Guest
Doin the right thing the wrong way?
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

Diesels burn less fuel, thus produce less CO2. The problem is the soot. Soot actually blocks sunlight, like wildfire smoke. Problem is it’s bad for your lungs. But it’s two different problems. Media and even regulators themselves often conflates or misplace the reasons for emissions regulations. Emissions control devices designed to reduce particulate matter, along with larger displacement to overcome the performance reductions mean diesels are burning more fuel per cube than they were 20 years ago. CARB acts like the folks who bought the engines are bad and should be punished. I just spent $6,000 on parts alone, to repair a DPF on a truck with 30,000 miles, that CARB will time-out for commercial use in 2023. There is no electric options out there yet for delivering all the stuff you want.

VMG
Guest
VMG
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

Gosh, never mind, YOUR pickup is SPECIAL!

Wait, isn’t diesel like 50 cents MORE than gas?

Isn’t it fun that you need a 4 ton vehicle to haul yourself around?

Mega me
Guest
Mega me
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

I actually have to haul my tool trailer packed with tools and drag around dump trailers with concrete pallets and mixers because i work with my hands for a living.

Not all of us can drive a Prius around , some people have to build things so other people have things called homes to live in.

Rio
Guest
Rio
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

Concrete comes in a truck
Cement comes in a bag

Mega me
Guest
Mega me
10 months ago
Reply to  Rio

I don’t get the joke

???
Guest
???
10 months ago
Reply to  Rio

Concrete can also be purchased in bags.

Willow Creeker
Guest
Willow Creeker
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

Waiting for that Tesla dump truck myself

Lone Ranger
Guest
Lone Ranger
9 months ago
Reply to  VMG

You would think you of all people would see the reason for a 4 ton vehicle. You push the vaccine but bash 4 ton vehicles.

VMG
Guest
VMG
9 months ago
Reply to  Lone Ranger

And what exactly IS the reason for a Dodge Diesel Dually? Probably to tow something you don’t need, like a goose-neck travel trailer when you want to visit Laughlin and park it in the Casino Lot… It’s OK, you can drive your electric scooter right in there, and breathe from your Oxygen tank while playing the slots and smoking off a pack of King Marlboros…

People, will need to get along with less, and not too far in the future either!

But in the meantime, sell your 1000 pounds, buy a new Dodge Dually, use all the water you want and screw the folks who will come along later…

Myself, during a historic drought, I feel best living near a big lake or a major river, and getting along without all that consumer crap. My line for cars is 30 mpg or higher, but Priuses are for UBER drivers…

Lots of my neighbors have pickups and 250hp Bass Boats, and some classic cars in the garage, but the anachronism of American consumerism will absolutely give way to the necessity of conservation and lifestyles of co-living and sustainability…

So, a 4 ton vehicle should go the way of smoking in restaurants and on planes, and consuming stupid stuff will draw looks of derision, and ostracization of gross consumerism will become the rule…

Except in San Francisco, where tech billionaires will still live in their $15 million condos and drive to Sunnyvale in Bright Green Lamborghinis at 110mph simply because they can…

Last edited 9 months ago by Permanently on Monitoring
The rich eat the poor
Guest
The rich eat the poor
9 months ago
Reply to  VMG

And yet the rich are getting rich and the working class is losing. A house costs over $230,000. And most employment is at $16 to $20 dollars an hour. Try and make payments on that. The cost of food is going up weekly. Fuel pushing $5 a gallon. Insurance rates going up. And yet the rich are getting richer. And Trump cut their taxes. What’s wrong with this formula? You’ll find out when X+0 = ZERO!

???
Guest
???
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

Gas mileage is one component of emissions, so as long as your truck also produces the same or fewer emissions then good for you. Did I miss diesel being mentioned in the article?

Eugene Womack
Member
Eugene Womack
10 months ago
Reply to  Mega me

That’s why diesel is so popular in Europe.

VMG
Guest
VMG
10 months ago
Reply to  Eugene Womack

Actually, the taxes they pay on diesel vehicles are lower than for gas vehicles… They also have more robust choices for cars, and, station wagons too…

Americans can get a load of big-butt vehicles, but a few choose Honda Hybrids, Lexus Hybrids and Nissan Leafs… Quality cars that burn less fuel.

Electrics? Not cleaner until you run it out past 25,000 miles, and the cost is ridiculous…

Even I like that EV Mustang SUV though!

Mass transit doesn't work.
Guest
Mass transit doesn't work.
9 months ago
Reply to  Eugene Womack

It’s not diesel it’s too many vehicles driven by one person.

Chris
Guest
Chris
9 months ago
Reply to  VMG

Your argumentive mixing and matching is hilarious.

VMG
Guest
VMG
9 months ago
Reply to  Chris

Thanks. You are pretty funny too!

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
10 months ago

Evidently McGuire and the scientists have never looked at the rings on a virgin redwood tree. Nor are they aware of the droughts of the1970s, 1930s and before. Periodic drought is and has always been a problem for the west, particularly for the southern half of California. Nor do they consider the fact that population especially in California has bludgeoned water use beyond the capacity to maintain aquifers. But left wing chicken little tactics are dominating every aspect of the political arena these days. Do these politicians ever do anything important? By the way, it was miserably foggy in Eureka this summer, in case mike didn’t notice. And has he ever been in the forest to look at the fire scars on virgin firs, redwoods and pines, or seen 100 year old fir forests with dead oaks here and there in them. Obviously the scientists havent either. And how about many of the recent fires being caused by mans negligence as well as arson. I could go on, like pointing out to him that average rainfall in Humboldt is higher in the last thirty years than in the previous thirty years and that local studies are available that show up and down variation is normal. Indeed , 1924 was the lowest summer flow on record for the eel river dry season, and that was before 10000 pot growers and significant logging andother diversions save potter valley.

Last edited 10 months ago by Jeffersonian
Kym Kemp
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian, the only reason 1924 was so low is because that was when the Lake Pillsbury reservoir behind newly- constructed Scott Dam at the top of the mainstem Eel River was being filled for the first time. https://kymkemp.com/2021/06/21/historic-lows-in-lower-eel-require-the-county-to-protect-it-says-friends-of-the-eel-river-to-supes/

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
10 months ago
Reply to  Kym Kemp

This was the flow at Scotia, which includes the entire watershed above there. So you are quite incorrect as to your statement of cause. To this day summer flows to the eel from van arsdale are negligible. Almost all goes to the russian.

Water wars
Guest
Water wars
9 months ago
Reply to  Kym Kemp

Do we know what McGuires position is regarding taking Eel River water to irrigate the vineyards in Mendocino etc?

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
9 months ago
Reply to  Water wars

He and Huffman want to continue the diversions. They are quite clear on this. They call it the 2basin solution.

Trashman
Guest
Trashman
10 months ago

OMG, a crisis, like you clowns can fix anything.

E=mc2
Member
E=mc2
10 months ago

That look doesn’t inspire much confidence.

Hick
Guest
Hick
10 months ago

Mother Nature is working diligently on a population control plan as we speak.

???
Guest
???
10 months ago
Reply to  Hick

You count human carbon pollution as an act of “mother nature”? Strange but I guess we are part of nature according to some defintions.

Mega me
Guest
Mega me
10 months ago
Reply to  Hick

Not a very effective plan. It’s failing miserably

Juanita
Guest
Juanita
10 months ago

PG&E. Should donate a 50kw generator to every school in California. To every hospital in CA. To every nursing home in CA.
Since no one goes to jail when a corporation commits felony murder, they need to pay…..

Joshua WoodsD
Member
10 months ago

What evidence of climate change? Our shores look the same as they did decades ago with expected erosion. So tired of hearing how climate change is fact when it has never been proven through scientific method but it’s ok to ignore scientific fact when it conflicts with the radical lefts agenda. I bet few young people realize as recently as the 70s the so-called scientists were warning of a upcoming ice age then completely reversed course a decade later and somehow became global warming….

stuber
Guest
stuber
10 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods
  1. Good for you! You are so correct. Children, do not listen to failed political hacks who lie about everything. Look at the shore line in Florida. Thousands of them right on the shore, at a cost of millions each, they haven’t flooded! Tell the children their teachers are full of shit, we do all the time. Wild fire world wide has declined from 4.9 million sq.km to 3.6 million. We also teach the children CRT is bull shit, and white people are not oppressors, nor, at least in America, black people are not oppressed.
Literally1984
Member
Literally1984
9 months ago
Reply to  stuber

“Do not listen to failed political hacks who lie about everything.”
I think I just blew past the LD50 of irony. Tell my family I love them, and please stay far away from schools.

thetallone
Guest
thetallone
10 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods

And the earth is flat.

Lone Ranger
Guest
Lone Ranger
10 months ago
Reply to  thetallone

Where is the wetter climate, we live in a wet climate but are turning drier at this point, total opposite of climate change predictions. What a joke , how about that flood in the 50s and again in the 60s ,climate change? Then took a break for 50 years? What a joke , climate change is like covid, money maker, can’t say I haven’t made a killing because of both, but total ridiculousness. I do remember it snowed in the emerald triangle on the 4th of July in the 50s , people would freak out if that happened now. Nobody even said a peep about climate change then .

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
9 months ago
Reply to  Lone Ranger

1996 high water was as high as the1955 flood. There have been many years of very high precipitation in the last fifty years. There have been occasional light snows in the high country as late as july 4 beyond the fifties.

Eugene Womack
Member
Eugene Womack
10 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods

We’re being manipulated to impose a carbon tax on everyone but there’s no excuse for the way we pollute our planet.

VMG
Guest
VMG
10 months ago
Reply to  Eugene Womack

A carbon tax is applied unevenly, so I propose a $3/gallon across the board tax on motor fuel, to be used to clean up the mess left behind by agricultural and industrial users…

Make it $4/gallon, because the government will waste or steal 25% anyway…

Eugene Womack
Member
Eugene Womack
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

Do I hear $5/gallon? Going once…
I thought this was special… The top economic officials from the world’s advanced economies reached a breakthrough on Saturday in their years long efforts to overhaul international tax laws, unveiling a broad agreement that aims to stop large multinational companies from seeking out tax havens and force them to pay more of their income to governments.
Finance leaders from the Group of 7 countries agreed to back a new global minimum tax rate of at least 15 percent that companies would have to pay regardless of where they locate their headquarters.
The agreement would also impose an additional tax on some of the largest multinational companies, potentially forcing technology giants like Amazon, Facebook and Google as well as other big global businesses to pay taxes to countries based on where their goods or services are sold, regardless of whether they have a physical presence in that nation.

Eugene Womack
Member
Eugene Womack
10 months ago
Reply to  VMG

Do I hear $5/gallon…Going once…

VMG
Guest
VMG
9 months ago
Reply to  Eugene Womack

Gasoline in England, $10/gallon…

Jeffersonian
Guest
Jeffersonian
9 months ago
Reply to  VMG

But you only have to drive a few miles to cross the whole country

lol
Guest
lol
10 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods

It has been “proven” using the scientific method, but you wouldn’t be able to determined that with your level of understanding.

You seem to be the victim of misinformation, part of the agenda of the right and their corporate sponsors.

https://skepticalscience.com/ice-age-predictions-in-1970s.htm

timb0man
Member
10 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods

The old, tired ice age story. We’ve come a long way in our understanding since the 1970’s.

Literally1984
Member
Literally1984
9 months ago
Reply to  Joshua Woods

Hi CJ! Very cool comment you have here. I see that you asked what evidence we have of climate change, so I’ve compiled some helpful data for you. According to Nasa, the following is true:

  • Global average temperatures have risen 2.12 degrees since 1880
  • The ocean has warmed (on average) 0.6 degrees since 1969
  • Antarctica alone lost ~148,000,000,000 tons of ice per year from 1993 to 2019
  • Here’s the evidence link if you would like to see more.

Also, I looked into your claim that “as recently as the 70s … scientists were warning of a upcoming ice age…”

As it turns out, this seems to be a myth, propagated by Sean Hannity, that has been debunked. You can see my source here: ice-age-predictions-in-1970s.htm

ILoveplants
Guest
ILoveplants
10 months ago

The United States only produces 10% of the global pollution. So, even if we produced ZERO pollution, there would still be 90% pollution being produced on the planet.

VMG
Guest
VMG
10 months ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

I think the facts you just made up are a bit off…

Hey, what about that COAL Train!!

lol
Guest
lol
10 months ago
Reply to  ILoveplants

Its actuality about 15%. 5.1 out of 33.1 billion metric tons per year.

You make an important point. We must impose significant tariffs on goods produces in nations with poor regulation of carbon emissions. Emission standards for cargo ship must also be radically updated. Hopefully carbon capture tech can help.

Selenium Surfer
Guest
Selenium Surfer
10 months ago

Sad thing is that all this climate change, global warming is a construct to remove their ability to live free and independent lives in the future. How many of these kids will accept the brain chip, merge with the machines?
climate change is a weapon, make no mistake about it

sparky
Guest
sparky
10 months ago

This was all predicted to happen back when China began world’s largest Three Gorges Dam Project… but nobody can remember anything anymore cause covid or maybe was always too dumb