Dead from Marijuana Posioning

 

Last year was a wet Humboldt year.  So why, right now, does the water level in the Eel look like that of a drought year?  Michael Jakubal writes beautifully and informatively of this on his blog, One Good Year.  The above is a graph of the water flow on the Eel as measured near Miranda.  By  mid August, the water flow has dropped below that of a normal year.  Why?

Read what Michael has to say,

This year’s (blue) flow line starts high—approximately 150 CFS, or about 60% above the 71-year median—but drops suddenly at the end of July and falls to approximately 20% below the 71-year median measured, ending up at drought-year levels.

Between early June and mid-September, the levels drop even faster between Leggett and Miranda, plunging the river into a near-crisis situation for the fish downstream. The decrease in flow causes toxic algae blooms that make the river unsafe for children and pets, while pools protecting baby salmonids go dry in the upper reaches of the Eel’s tributaries. The only reasonable explanation is that the water is being mechanically withdrawn, while the only water use that has significantly increased in the SoHum area is that taken for the irrigation of marijuana gardens. Furthermore, the steepening slope of the blue line as the summer progresses is consistent with increasing plant growth and corresponding water needs, reducing the likelihood that the withdrawals are non-agricultural in character.

If you didn’t just get that, let me repeat: I believe that pot growers in northern Mendocino and southern Humboldt are largely responsible for the dewatering and toxification of our river.

His post, as always, is clear and cogent.  You will follow his arguments easily and then end at the same inescapable conclusion that he does.  I read this and cried.

This Thursday, the Schatz Energy Research Center, affiliated with HSU, invites everyone to join them to listen to Dr. Evan Mills discuss “The Carbon Footprint of Indoor Cannabis Production.”  Humboldt is beautiful now.  How much longer though will we all be responsible for the terrible damage marijuana is doing to our rivers and our air?  We all benefit from marijuana money (Don’t pretend you don’t get any benefit. Yes, you do even if you’ve never seen a plant; the money that comes in provides greater variety of food in the grocery store, greater variety of entertainment, more businesses to choose from, more jobs, etc.)  Now, we all need to find a solution.

Read Michael’s piece. Get informed. Get active. Let’s minimize the harm and maximize the benefits before the Eel and its watershed dies from Marijuana Poisoning.

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73 comments

  • WHAT ABOUT WATER DIVERSION FROM POTTER VALLEY?

    JUST A THOUGHT…..

  • Yes it is true that indoor growers use electricity but indoor growers in Arcata are using municipal water of which there is an excess. So on that ecological point the indoor growers in the metro area have an advantage over the sohum irrigators.

    There is an obvious solution though it would require a pipeline. HMWD is desperate to sell the surplus water that used to be used by the Samoa Mill. It would be wonderful to use it to save the fish in the Sohum Rivers as long as the Mad river is also maintained. It would be logical to have the irrigators finance the pipeline.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

    • So it is okay to drain water from the Mad River and have it chemically treated to use in your pot? So you support the dam that blocks salmon from going all the way up the Mad River so you can use the EXCESS water for your pot.

      There is no Eco-groovy way to say this, but pot will end Humboldt Trinity Mendo as a green heaven.

      Between the increased use in electricity driving the need for more and more gas driven electric plants [Humboldt Bay] to the over use of water from the rivers to the poison used to increase growth and buds…yes even your organic stuff is not good for fish and water. Hell cyanide is organic guys!

      If we are going to take all the water from the fish we might as well start clear-cutting too since salmon are not a big deal I guess? Only weed do we really worry about and how it impacts our pockets.

  • Yes it is true that indoor growers use electricity but indoor growers in Arcata are using municipal water of which there is an excess. So on that ecological point the indoor growers in the metro area have an advantage over the sohum irrigators.

    There is an obvious solution though it would require a pipeline. HMWD is desperate to sell the surplus water that used to be used by the Samoa Mill. It would be wonderful to use it to save the fish in the Sohum Rivers as long as the Mad river is also maintained. It would be logical to have the irrigators finance the pipeline.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

    • So it is okay to drain water from the Mad River and have it chemically treated to use in your pot? So you support the dam that blocks salmon from going all the way up the Mad River so you can use the EXCESS water for your pot.

      There is no Eco-groovy way to say this, but pot will end Humboldt Trinity Mendo as a green heaven.

      Between the increased use in electricity driving the need for more and more gas driven electric plants [Humboldt Bay] to the over use of water from the rivers to the poison used to increase growth and buds…yes even your organic stuff is not good for fish and water. Hell cyanide is organic guys!

      If we are going to take all the water from the fish we might as well start clear-cutting too since salmon are not a big deal I guess? Only weed do we really worry about and how it impacts our pockets.

  • And people want to remove dams from the Klamath, et al why? It seems everyone’s cogent abilities disappear when it comes to the amount of water necessary to grow 200….or 20 million 5-foot tall plants. Water that they don’t pay a cent for that rancers and farmers do. I’m not anti-pot in the slightest, hell I voted for prop 19, with all its faults, but there are some obvious things that people conveniently ignore.

  • And people want to remove dams from the Klamath, et al why? It seems everyone’s cogent abilities disappear when it comes to the amount of water necessary to grow 200….or 20 million 5-foot tall plants. Water that they don’t pay a cent for that rancers and farmers do. I’m not anti-pot in the slightest, hell I voted for prop 19, with all its faults, but there are some obvious things that people conveniently ignore.

  • imagine if the timber industry were responsible for this…

  • imagine if the timber industry were responsible for this…

  • Thanks for the reposting, there was also a cover story about this in the North Coast Journal, a few months back, with specific data about the decline of fish in the Eel.

    Commenters here offer denial, finger pointing, and techno-fixes. Exactly the same responses that large corporations give when the impacts of their operations are exposed and criticized.

    • My old buddy NAN again… He should change his name to “Wrong-Way Corrigan“. The fish runs last winter were a record run of Chinook Salmon due to the abundant rainfall for the past few years. (as evidenced by this link) But Alas, the river is still in deep, deep trouble. Or should I say shallow, shallow trouble. The surface gravel mining has proven to be detrimental, but digging channels, and deep holes, has proven beneficial. So, how do we extract gravel? You guessed it, we skim the surface and cause rivilets.

      Sadly, otherwise, I agree with him. The old red-herring has been drug back and forth over the truth of what happened to the fall flows of our precious Eel River. Holding the Potter Valley Dam project up to divert our attention away from what else is happening to our water is classic. We need to approach all problems impacting our river. Kym is entirely correct that we all benefit from Marijuana agriculture. But, just like the legitimate crops of the Sacramento Valley, we need to solve our water problems. The main problem is over-use of our Autum river water

      • I’m thingking of changing my name to “IAN” (is a native).

      • “The fish runs last winter were a record run of Chinook Salmon due to the abundant rainfall for the past few years. ”

        A load of CRAP. They were better than usual, but not record. Record would have been when the Fernbridge Cannery collected millions at its facility. Record would have been in the early 80s when they could be seen jamming up the river by the thousands. The last ten years are nothing and you know it. Again, stop protecting the over use of water to line your pockets. This is shameful….

  • Thanks for the reposting, there was also a cover story about this in the North Coast Journal, a few months back, with specific data about the decline of fish in the Eel.

    Commenters here offer denial, finger pointing, and techno-fixes. Exactly the same responses that large corporations give when the impacts of their operations are exposed and criticized.

    • My old buddy NAN again… He should change his name to “Wrong-Way Corrigan“. The fish runs last winter were a record run of Chinook Salmon due to the abundant rainfall for the past few years. (as evidenced by this link) But Alas, the river is still in deep, deep trouble. Or should I say shallow, shallow trouble. The surface gravel mining has proven to be detrimental, but digging channels, and deep holes, has proven beneficial. So, how do we extract gravel? You guessed it, we skim the surface and cause rivilets.

      Sadly, otherwise, I agree with him. The old red-herring has been drug back and forth over the truth of what happened to the fall flows of our precious Eel River. Holding the Potter Valley Dam project up to divert our attention away from what else is happening to our water is classic. We need to approach all problems impacting our river. Kym is entirely correct that we all benefit from Marijuana agriculture. But, just like the legitimate crops of the Sacramento Valley, we need to solve our water problems. The main problem is over-use of our Autum river water

      • I’m thingking of changing my name to “IAN” (is a native).

      • “The fish runs last winter were a record run of Chinook Salmon due to the abundant rainfall for the past few years. ”

        A load of CRAP. They were better than usual, but not record. Record would have been when the Fernbridge Cannery collected millions at its facility. Record would have been in the early 80s when they could be seen jamming up the river by the thousands. The last ten years are nothing and you know it. Again, stop protecting the over use of water to line your pockets. This is shameful….

  • Thoughtful post and an urgent call to action. It’s high time to green the green – this means not only growing in the sun, but growing with a responsible water supply (i.e. pulling all the straws out of the creeks and relying instead upon rainwater catchment and storage). There may be some who have switched over, but it is clear that we are not acting fast enough.

    This situation also calls attention to the need for an updated General Plan that promotes water-wise practices. Fortunately, the Planning Commission has just voted on a suite of policies that aim to keep local rivers flowing with abundant, clean and cool water. We just need to make sure the County moves forward on the Update despite the ongoing calls by certain interest groups for it to be stopped.

  • Thoughtful post and an urgent call to action. It’s high time to green the green – this means not only growing in the sun, but growing with a responsible water supply (i.e. pulling all the straws out of the creeks and relying instead upon rainwater catchment and storage). There may be some who have switched over, but it is clear that we are not acting fast enough.

    This situation also calls attention to the need for an updated General Plan that promotes water-wise practices. Fortunately, the Planning Commission has just voted on a suite of policies that aim to keep local rivers flowing with abundant, clean and cool water. We just need to make sure the County moves forward on the Update despite the ongoing calls by certain interest groups for it to be stopped.

  • I had no idea that the situation was so bad. I read Michael’s blog and my eyes opened wide.
    Something has to change soon.

  • I had no idea that the situation was so bad. I read Michael’s blog and my eyes opened wide.
    Something has to change soon.

  • Correction the NCJ article I referred to is specifically about the Mattole. But it alluded to the Eel.

    here’s a quote:

    “When salmon numbers dwindle, it suggests a serious imbalance in the ecosystem.
    Such is the case on the North Coast. The numbers of coho salmon in river systems throughout our region have plummeted. In the past two years, scientists studying the Mattole River have seen the largest decreases ever recorded.”

    As far as the Eel, yep Chinook numbers are recently risen, but not primarily because of human “management” efforts. Focusing heavily on the recent numbers is naive and a sucker’s trap. From Pat Higgins’ Eel report:

    “The major reasons for the population rebound include 1) mainstem Eel River spawning habitat recovery, 2) high spring flows for recent brood years, 3) good ocean conditions, 4)reduced fishing pressure, and 5) a cycle of reduced pikeminnow abundance……mostly the rebound is resulting from natural forces. The Chinook salmon is not necessarily the best indicator of Eel River ecological conditions because they only require a brief period of freshwater residence. In fact the Eel River is showing signs of extremely perturbed watershed hydrology and its water quality has so deteriorated that the South Fork, Van Duzen and lower Eel River are plagued with toxic algae. Habitat conditions in the lower Eel River are extremely poor and suitable deep water pools for Chinook salmon are limited. Algae blooms within these pools are a sign of acute nutrient pollution and pose a threat to fish health.”

    • Correction: the NCJ article I referred to is specifically about the Mattole
      We all make mistakes… I just didn’t think that it was possible in your particular case. But… You are seldom forgiving of others. Especially not natives.
      IAN

  • Correction the NCJ article I referred to is specifically about the Mattole. But it alluded to the Eel.

    here’s a quote:

    “When salmon numbers dwindle, it suggests a serious imbalance in the ecosystem.
    Such is the case on the North Coast. The numbers of coho salmon in river systems throughout our region have plummeted. In the past two years, scientists studying the Mattole River have seen the largest decreases ever recorded.”

    As far as the Eel, yep Chinook numbers are recently risen, but not primarily because of human “management” efforts. Focusing heavily on the recent numbers is naive and a sucker’s trap. From Pat Higgins’ Eel report:

    “The major reasons for the population rebound include 1) mainstem Eel River spawning habitat recovery, 2) high spring flows for recent brood years, 3) good ocean conditions, 4)reduced fishing pressure, and 5) a cycle of reduced pikeminnow abundance……mostly the rebound is resulting from natural forces. The Chinook salmon is not necessarily the best indicator of Eel River ecological conditions because they only require a brief period of freshwater residence. In fact the Eel River is showing signs of extremely perturbed watershed hydrology and its water quality has so deteriorated that the South Fork, Van Duzen and lower Eel River are plagued with toxic algae. Habitat conditions in the lower Eel River are extremely poor and suitable deep water pools for Chinook salmon are limited. Algae blooms within these pools are a sign of acute nutrient pollution and pose a threat to fish health.”

    • Correction: the NCJ article I referred to is specifically about the Mattole
      We all make mistakes… I just didn’t think that it was possible in your particular case. But… You are seldom forgiving of others. Especially not natives.
      IAN

  • Get informed is a good suggestion. First, it is a common misnomer that the southfork of the Eel is impacted by the Potter valley project. The headwaters of the southfork are near Branscomb.
    Second, it is a common misnomer that fertilizer runoff from pot patches contributes to the algal bloom. The reports of the Water district which checks for water quality regularly do not show any excess nitrates at their test point in the river near Garberville. This is not to say no leaching whatsoever occurs, but not to the extent that finger pointers may wish to believe.
    Third, I have read an account of a traveler heading to Round Valley around 1888 who rode his horse down to the main Eel in the late summer and finding it to be so brackish with green algae , rode on, despite great thirst.
    So even without today’s influences, the algal bloom has happened from low water levels in the past.

    As a regular swimmer, I thought the water levels near Piercy were way down from July 1st on compared to last years flow. My point being that the low levels being monitored at Miranda, were also observed south of the Humboldt/Mendocino county line as well.
    Without a doubt “OVERPOTULATION” is a burden on stream and river ecology. The number of growers moving into our area from outside just to grow pot has spiked in recent years, and many homegrown locals are greedily growing more than ever with no regard to stream health or the environment. How does a community reign in greed and self-interest?
    So I have no problem with the basic premise of this post Kym, and make no attempt to defend excessive use of limited water supplies but I would like to know how fluctuating levels of gravel in the streambed affects the CFS readings, and whether those gravel levels are factored in.

    Just a few thoughts for the stream of comments.

  • Get informed is a good suggestion. First, it is a common misnomer that the southfork of the Eel is impacted by the Potter valley project. The headwaters of the southfork are near Branscomb.
    Second, it is a common misnomer that fertilizer runoff from pot patches contributes to the algal bloom. The reports of the Water district which checks for water quality regularly do not show any excess nitrates at their test point in the river near Garberville. This is not to say no leaching whatsoever occurs, but not to the extent that finger pointers may wish to believe.
    Third, I have read an account of a traveler heading to Round Valley around 1888 who rode his horse down to the main Eel in the late summer and finding it to be so brackish with green algae , rode on, despite great thirst.
    So even without today’s influences, the algal bloom has happened from low water levels in the past.

    As a regular swimmer, I thought the water levels near Piercy were way down from July 1st on compared to last years flow. My point being that the low levels being monitored at Miranda, were also observed south of the Humboldt/Mendocino county line as well.
    Without a doubt “OVERPOTULATION” is a burden on stream and river ecology. The number of growers moving into our area from outside just to grow pot has spiked in recent years, and many homegrown locals are greedily growing more than ever with no regard to stream health or the environment. How does a community reign in greed and self-interest?
    So I have no problem with the basic premise of this post Kym, and make no attempt to defend excessive use of limited water supplies but I would like to know how fluctuating levels of gravel in the streambed affects the CFS readings, and whether those gravel levels are factored in.

    Just a few thoughts for the stream of comments.

  • Sorry for the weird clausing with commas.

  • Sorry for the weird clausing with commas.

  • The Potter Valley project IS significant. The folks in Sonoma County get to swim in their river, while we in the Eel are poisoned by Algae. The Russian River flows are huge in the summer, all so the ethanol producers (wine growers) can suck out of the river, and the yuppies can go for a cool refreshing dip in their “wild” river. It is a fact that Sonoma county has enough water reserves to do without the diversion of the Eel, (Lake Sonoma), and Mendocino does not need the water as the lake Mendocino drainage can supply them. The only real obstacle is that there is no pipeline to get lake Sonoma water up to the north end of Sonoma county (to the Cloverdale area).
    Blaming the cannabis growers is just sensationalism. We could also blame people who use the water to wash their laundry. Kill the Van Arsdale dam and we get 154,000 acre feet more water each year.

  • The Potter Valley project IS significant. The folks in Sonoma County get to swim in their river, while we in the Eel are poisoned by Algae. The Russian River flows are huge in the summer, all so the ethanol producers (wine growers) can suck out of the river, and the yuppies can go for a cool refreshing dip in their “wild” river. It is a fact that Sonoma county has enough water reserves to do without the diversion of the Eel, (Lake Sonoma), and Mendocino does not need the water as the lake Mendocino drainage can supply them. The only real obstacle is that there is no pipeline to get lake Sonoma water up to the north end of Sonoma county (to the Cloverdale area).
    Blaming the cannabis growers is just sensationalism. We could also blame people who use the water to wash their laundry. Kill the Van Arsdale dam and we get 154,000 acre feet more water each year.

  • Scooter has it correct. Look at the timeframe of the demise of the Eel. In the 80’s, early 90’s we had plenty of water, then wham!! When the sonoma/napa valley vineyards grew in large proportions, we starting seeing a drastic decrease in the Eel’s water level. The diversion tunnel water flow must have increased tremendously over the last 20yrs….how else are they watering the grapes and still have rivers to swim in??
    Robbery, I say!!

    • And now with semi-legal cannabis growing we are seeing another loss of water that is decimating the Eel once again…sure lets kill the dam in the name of cannabis!

  • Scooter has it correct. Look at the timeframe of the demise of the Eel. In the 80’s, early 90’s we had plenty of water, then wham!! When the sonoma/napa valley vineyards grew in large proportions, we starting seeing a drastic decrease in the Eel’s water level. The diversion tunnel water flow must have increased tremendously over the last 20yrs….how else are they watering the grapes and still have rivers to swim in??
    Robbery, I say!!

    • And now with semi-legal cannabis growing we are seeing another loss of water that is decimating the Eel once again…sure lets kill the dam in the name of cannabis!

  • As mentioned above, water levels on the South Fork Eel (the subject of this post) are not impacted by the Potter Valley diversion. Of course the diversion at Potter Valley is a significant problem for the mainstem Eel and it would be a huge benefit to reclaim the water that is now rerouted to the Russian. Unfortunately, doing away with the Van Arsdale dam would still not put water back into the South Fork.

  • As mentioned above, water levels on the South Fork Eel (the subject of this post) are not impacted by the Potter Valley diversion. Of course the diversion at Potter Valley is a significant problem for the mainstem Eel and it would be a huge benefit to reclaim the water that is now rerouted to the Russian. Unfortunately, doing away with the Van Arsdale dam would still not put water back into the South Fork.

  • DJ is right; the South Fork of the Eel has no water diverted out of it by Potter. Here’s a map showing the dams (run cursor over lower right corner)

    • Kym
      Even though the Lake Pillsbery Dam and the Potter Valley Valley bypass, that diverts Eel Water down the Russian River is not on the South Fork, the lack of water affects the South Fork fish runs at the estuary and from the confluence to the ocean. It takes a village.

      • True indeed Ernie, and I’m certainly not arguing for the Potter diversion. I want it gone. But I was pointing out that those dams are not responsible for the lack of flow through the South Fork.

  • DJ is right; the South Fork of the Eel has no water diverted out of it by Potter. Here’s a map showing the dams (run cursor over lower right corner)

    • Kym
      Even though the Lake Pillsbery Dam and the Potter Valley Valley bypass, that diverts Eel Water down the Russian River is not on the South Fork, the lack of water affects the South Fork fish runs at the estuary and from the confluence to the ocean. It takes a village.

      • True indeed Ernie, and I’m certainly not arguing for the Potter diversion. I want it gone. But I was pointing out that those dams are not responsible for the lack of flow through the South Fork.

  • Hey Kim:
    Good post, good catch. I’m pro-weed. I smoke it, grow it, like it. But, if you commercialize it’s production you introduce money. I like money as well (use it, smoke it, like it…:-) ), but it can make people compromise values sometimes.

    We need to take a good look at that.

  • Hey Kim:
    Good post, good catch. I’m pro-weed. I smoke it, grow it, like it. But, if you commercialize it’s production you introduce money. I like money as well (use it, smoke it, like it…:-) ), but it can make people compromise values sometimes.

    We need to take a good look at that.

  • Are there no places in the s.f.Eel watershed that could be damned for storage to supplement the river flows during the dry season.

    • OMG are we all idiots now? Environmental damage is okay as long as we can have our pot and line out pockets with the excess money it makes us! What happened here in Humboldt?

      Are you still against logging and support dams? WOW!

  • Are there no places in the s.f.Eel watershed that could be damned for storage to supplement the river flows during the dry season.

    • OMG are we all idiots now? Environmental damage is okay as long as we can have our pot and line out pockets with the excess money it makes us! What happened here in Humboldt?

      Are you still against logging and support dams? WOW!

  • Here’s a PHD thesis in the making… The 70 year average is certainly important but a comparison of the last ten years would give a better idea of the pot irrigation impact. As the price of outdoor bud drops, growers simply plant more. Outdoor production is cheap compared to indoor especially now with the price of diesel so high. Last spring, I watched an entire semi load of soil being shuttled up Fish Creek in the middle of the day. Paranoia is at a very low level, these days. Big grows are the thing to do. Bing maps has a newish satellite view of the area. Check out the greenhouses. Laat spring, the scene in Garberville as truck and trailer loads of soil rolled through town was hilarious. Law enforcement is a non issue these days. Le’s get some HSU grad students down here to figure it all out. Let’s say an outdoor plant averages 3 gallons a day and the grower has 100 plants. In the three critical water months of July, August and September, the grower will have used 27, 000 gallons of water. The fact is that large plants require more water than this. Many people do use ponds or large tanks but the fact is that pot is causing the same problems here as the grape industry is causing for the Russia River.

  • Here’s a PHD thesis in the making… The 70 year average is certainly important but a comparison of the last ten years would give a better idea of the pot irrigation impact. As the price of outdoor bud drops, growers simply plant more. Outdoor production is cheap compared to indoor especially now with the price of diesel so high. Last spring, I watched an entire semi load of soil being shuttled up Fish Creek in the middle of the day. Paranoia is at a very low level, these days. Big grows are the thing to do. Bing maps has a newish satellite view of the area. Check out the greenhouses. Laat spring, the scene in Garberville as truck and trailer loads of soil rolled through town was hilarious. Law enforcement is a non issue these days. Le’s get some HSU grad students down here to figure it all out. Let’s say an outdoor plant averages 3 gallons a day and the grower has 100 plants. In the three critical water months of July, August and September, the grower will have used 27, 000 gallons of water. The fact is that large plants require more water than this. Many people do use ponds or large tanks but the fact is that pot is causing the same problems here as the grape industry is causing for the Russia River.

  • Growing pot is a pure form of hypocrisy. Once upon a time it was grown in people’s back yards for their own use as depicted in Kym’s video links. Those same people were trying to stop devastating logging and its impacts on the land. Now the logging is covering fewer acres than ever, less impactive than ever, and EPIC struggles to justify a REAL existence attacking what they once wish the industry would look like. All the while pot farms got more and most destructive until now where we have chemicals and litter all over the National Forests, diesel generators sucking fossil fuels, the need for gas fires PG&E plants on the rise, and for the first time ever, in wet years the North Coast is out of water? What the hell guys?
    I need to move, it is no longer about the environment or our beautiful County. Now it is about how much you can make in a few months, no taxes, not giving back to what gave you this earth. I am ashamed of you all.

  • Growing pot is a pure form of hypocrisy. Once upon a time it was grown in people’s back yards for their own use as depicted in Kym’s video links. Those same people were trying to stop devastating logging and its impacts on the land. Now the logging is covering fewer acres than ever, less impactive than ever, and EPIC struggles to justify a REAL existence attacking what they once wish the industry would look like. All the while pot farms got more and most destructive until now where we have chemicals and litter all over the National Forests, diesel generators sucking fossil fuels, the need for gas fires PG&E plants on the rise, and for the first time ever, in wet years the North Coast is out of water? What the hell guys?
    I need to move, it is no longer about the environment or our beautiful County. Now it is about how much you can make in a few months, no taxes, not giving back to what gave you this earth. I am ashamed of you all.

  • I agree with Concerned on this.
    These selfish growers are acting negligently without regard to the desruction they are causing. It is completely irresponsible and I am disgusted that we, as a community, support such behavior.

    • I see we have lost Humboldt Trinity and Mendo…We talk of the eco-groovy uses of pot. We talk of the medicinal uses. Being organic, but I hear from everyone about how can we do it bigger cheaper and get more money out of it.

      All of the talk above makes me vomit…Oh maybe I need a 215!

      What happened to love of any of the Earth? Hell we might as well not worry about it. Maybe we can get the timber companies to dam a river and clearcut so you have both a place to grow and water and we can built a pipeline a ship it to your friends. That will only be a 300 foot wide clearcut for miles!

      Idiots!

  • I agree with Concerned on this.
    These selfish growers are acting negligently without regard to the desruction they are causing. It is completely irresponsible and I am disgusted that we, as a community, support such behavior.

    • I see we have lost Humboldt Trinity and Mendo…We talk of the eco-groovy uses of pot. We talk of the medicinal uses. Being organic, but I hear from everyone about how can we do it bigger cheaper and get more money out of it.

      All of the talk above makes me vomit…Oh maybe I need a 215!

      What happened to love of any of the Earth? Hell we might as well not worry about it. Maybe we can get the timber companies to dam a river and clearcut so you have both a place to grow and water and we can built a pipeline a ship it to your friends. That will only be a 300 foot wide clearcut for miles!

      Idiots!

  • Average American household = 127k gallons annually

    Average grape crop = 500 gallons of wine per acre = 400k gallons of water per acre

    100 marijuana plants = 27k(?) gallons per year

  • Average American household = 127k gallons annually

    Average grape crop = 500 gallons of wine per acre = 400k gallons of water per acre

    100 marijuana plants = 27k(?) gallons per year

    • For perspective, that’s about 15 typical swimming pools diverted over the course of a season, and it’s being recognized as the unusually large diversion it is. Research how much water the local development industry uses PER DAY. Look into atmospheric dehydration while you’re at it. The problem is much bigger than just one or two rivers drying up. It’s the whole world all of a sudden. Focus your anger and fight the real enemy. Smoke a bowl to chill when you’re done. One world, one body of water. Rather they stop growing concrete and start growing plants with it.

      • This post is concerned with the local watersheds. I know big business causes massive ecological collapse all over the world. However, it seems clear that unregulated water use from marijuana cultivation is causing our local river’s flows to decrease. I just think it’s something we need to be aware of. You seem a little overly sensitive about this.

        • yeah yeah blogs. you seem a little bla about bla yourself. anything can seem like anything bla bla bla words.

          My point is that “regulated” water use of local watersheds is far more catastrophic (which doesn’t get any media attention, yet you single out marijuana cultivation to argue, obviously and conveniently being at the forefront of your attention, surprise surprise…none of this is part of my point) Get the money to get the paperwork to rape the land to get more money to get more paperwork to rape more land. Imagine if we focused our efforts and defunct some of the harmful industry that gobbles up most of what’s being diverted…only they don’t call it diversion when they’ve paid for the paperwork.

          • I don’t wanna get into it…very disheartening to see where things are still going, now ten solid years of this exact state of the art means of “meaningful discussion” .

            Food for thought requiring sincere thought: what do you think “the situation” is going to be like in 50 years? Locally, globally, whatever…

            …really think about it…

            Now, really…really…imagine what somebody JUST LIKE YOURSELF thought 50 years ago who argued, struggled, hoped, fought for “the situation” to be like today. 2011 and still proving to be the mother of all letdowns for them and all those before them, eh?

            Marijuana growers are not destroying the river. Construction and logging is. Not just in humboldt, but all over the world. Not even a matter of debate. Imagine if we stopped barfing all over marijuana growers and really focused on the real problem.

          • Shgankar, you are nothing but a slimy anti=marijuana propagandist posing as a politically correct environmentalist spewing out fucked up bullshit aimed against growers. Get a life dude.

    • For perspective, that’s about 15 typical swimming pools diverted over the course of a season, and it’s being recognized as the unusually large diversion it is. Research how much water the local development industry uses PER DAY. Look into atmospheric dehydration while you’re at it. The problem is much bigger than just one or two rivers drying up. It’s the whole world all of a sudden. Focus your anger and fight the real enemy. Smoke a bowl to chill when you’re done. One world, one body of water. Rather they stop growing concrete and start growing plants with it.

      • This post is concerned with the local watersheds. I know big business causes massive ecological collapse all over the world. However, it seems clear that unregulated water use from marijuana cultivation is causing our local river’s flows to decrease. I just think it’s something we need to be aware of. You seem a little overly sensitive about this.

        • yeah yeah blogs. you seem a little bla about bla yourself. anything can seem like anything bla bla bla words.

          My point is that “regulated” water use of local watersheds is far more catastrophic (which doesn’t get any media attention, yet you single out marijuana cultivation to argue, obviously and conveniently being at the forefront of your attention, surprise surprise…none of this is part of my point) Get the money to get the paperwork to rape the land to get more money to get more paperwork to rape more land. Imagine if we focused our efforts and defunct some of the harmful industry that gobbles up most of what’s being diverted…only they don’t call it diversion when they’ve paid for the paperwork.

          • I don’t wanna get into it…very disheartening to see where things are still going, now ten solid years of this exact state of the art means of “meaningful discussion” .

            Food for thought requiring sincere thought: what do you think “the situation” is going to be like in 50 years? Locally, globally, whatever…

            …really think about it…

            Now, really…really…imagine what somebody JUST LIKE YOURSELF thought 50 years ago who argued, struggled, hoped, fought for “the situation” to be like today. 2011 and still proving to be the mother of all letdowns for them and all those before them, eh?

            Marijuana growers are not destroying the river. Construction and logging is. Not just in humboldt, but all over the world. Not even a matter of debate. Imagine if we stopped barfing all over marijuana growers and really focused on the real problem.

          • Shgankar, you are nothing but a slimy anti=marijuana propagandist posing as a politically correct environmentalist spewing out fucked up bullshit aimed against growers. Get a life dude.

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