Big Agribuisness not Humboldt Grower's Competitor in Near Future

Although much of the concern over legalization swirls around the fear of large international agribusiness co-opting marijuana, in fact, for many reasons, agribusinesses won’t be the growers immediate concern.  According to an excellent series by CNBC (Check it out–I highly recommend it)

Seed and agri-chemical maker Monsanto isn’t focused on [growing marijuana], says spokesman Darren Wallis, adding that even if that changed tomorrow, development of a mass-scale crop takes time.

“We focus on major crops for food, feed and biofuels—corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, wheat, sugarcane and vegetables,” he says. “It takes eight to ten years of investment to bring a biotech product to market.”

Other big food and agricultural firms would not comment, saying the proposition was too hypothetical or inappropriate given the largely illegal current status of the drug.

Furthermore, international organizations and even national organizations would have to contend with fighting the federal government.  Probably not initially worth their while.  Perhaps somewhere down the road when marijuana is legal in the majority of the states.  But not now.

What small mom and pop growers should consider as their competitors likely to put them out of business is the large industrial grows at dispensaries where football field size grows may soon be the norm.

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7 comments

  • Have you heard any rumors about Ed Rosethal and partners starting up an HMO-like marijuana center in Southern California?
    Heard on the grapevine that they are looking for large amounts (weekly) from Humboldt County.
    Just talk mind you…

  • Shhh Dave before you mess up the program.

    But serious, they ain’t gonna make Roundup-ready dosia anytime soon. Before people get all stupid about this, look at hops. Folks do grow 500 acres of hybrid, fast growing dookie hops and sell that. But, you still gotta either cop specialty hops or grow your own to make dank brew. Now, good ass beer that uses spendy hops isn’t exactly unpopular, so why would chronic weed and bammer not stay distributed how they are?

    I mean fuck look at any big weed market and any big specialty hops microbrew market. They overlap like hell already. If anything dank will gain market share over bammer. I would stay away from BAMR investments.

  • Shhh Dave before you mess up the program.

    But serious, they ain’t gonna make Roundup-ready dosia anytime soon. Before people get all stupid about this, look at hops. Folks do grow 500 acres of hybrid, fast growing dookie hops and sell that. But, you still gotta either cop specialty hops or grow your own to make dank brew. Now, good ass beer that uses spendy hops isn’t exactly unpopular, so why would chronic weed and bammer not stay distributed how they are?

    I mean fuck look at any big weed market and any big specialty hops microbrew market. They overlap like hell already. If anything dank will gain market share over bammer. I would stay away from BAMR investments.

  • You know, I hear a lot of angst about Big Pharma and Philip Morris taking over and/or ruining the marijuana markets after legalization, but I have yet to see a shred of evidence suggesting those fears are grounded in fact. If the goal is to micromanage the more capitalistic aspects of cannabis production, pot advocates are hardly the first to fall prey to that mindset: All corporations are evil, hence corporate cannabis production is evil. And the corrollary to that argument is that home- or collective-grown products are superior by default.

    Not buying it. Not for a second.

    If the goal is to create sustainable best practices for cannabis growers and suppliers, as it should be, the notion of corporate involvement becomes much less scary. For starters, corporations are merely legal constructs that can’t (or shouldn’t) be judged inferior to sole proprietorships or collectives for no other reason than their organizational structure. Corporations offer legal protection to officers and employees that simply aren’t available elsewhere, and despite the expense and reporting requirements involved you’re going to see more of them in the future. That’s hardly a bad thing; it’s a sign of a maturing industry.

  • You know, I hear a lot of angst about Big Pharma and Philip Morris taking over and/or ruining the marijuana markets after legalization, but I have yet to see a shred of evidence suggesting those fears are grounded in fact. If the goal is to micromanage the more capitalistic aspects of cannabis production, pot advocates are hardly the first to fall prey to that mindset: All corporations are evil, hence corporate cannabis production is evil. And the corrollary to that argument is that home- or collective-grown products are superior by default.

    Not buying it. Not for a second.

    If the goal is to create sustainable best practices for cannabis growers and suppliers, as it should be, the notion of corporate involvement becomes much less scary. For starters, corporations are merely legal constructs that can’t (or shouldn’t) be judged inferior to sole proprietorships or collectives for no other reason than their organizational structure. Corporations offer legal protection to officers and employees that simply aren’t available elsewhere, and despite the expense and reporting requirements involved you’re going to see more of them in the future. That’s hardly a bad thing; it’s a sign of a maturing industry.

  • Fiance here:

    There is a letter to the editor in the Ukiah Daily Journal from a former official of mendocino (sorry can’t remember his name) that addresses what Bud is saying. Its one of the most cohesive and sensible things I’ve seen anyone anywhere write about legalization. You might want to go check it out.

  • Fiance here:

    There is a letter to the editor in the Ukiah Daily Journal from a former official of mendocino (sorry can’t remember his name) that addresses what Bud is saying. Its one of the most cohesive and sensible things I’ve seen anyone anywhere write about legalization. You might want to go check it out.

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