Mexican Congress Debating Legalizing Marijuana

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For the next three days, the Mexican Congress is debating the pros and cons of legalizing Marijuana.  Although the debate is not expected to end with action, the discourse indicates that world opinion is turning against prohibitive drug laws.  In February, Cesar Gaviria of Colombia, Ernesto Zedillo of Mexico and Fernando Cardoso of Brazil, each former presidents of their countries, urged Latin America, in the face of rising drug related violence, to consider legalizing the herb.

In 2006, under pressure from the Bush Administration, Mexico pulled back from a policy that would have made those in possession of small amounts of marijuana not liable for prison time.  How will the Obama Administration react to this discussion?  Obama is scheduled to be in Mexico right after the talks.

Portugal has already decriminalized the possession of marijuana.  The writing is on the wall.  It is only a matter of time before other countries do the same.  One on California’s doorstep such as Mexico will radically change the financial dynamics of Humboldt’s underground economy.  Legalization is coming.  This county needs to prepare for the financial disaster that could occur if we don’t have steps in place to minimize the damage and maximize our potential.

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9 comments

  • This is interesting news.

    I’d like to see some progress towards legalization…even if it is in Mexico. Down the road it could help the effort in the USA.

  • I don’t think that legalization will harm Humboldt that much. Humboldt and Mendocino growers already face tough competition from growers in other states (marijuana is the largest cash crop in several states) and growers in British Columbia and Mexico.

    Although almost anyone can grow a little pot by throwing some seeds in the ground, it takes skill to grow really good pot. The skill (social capital) and the infrastructure is here in the Emerald Triangle to grow good pot. Some big corporation will maybe be able to mass market some schwag cigs but it will take years for them to produce really good bud.

    I think that there is plenty of potential for pot tourism once legalization occurs, with people visiting “potteries” to sample and buy the years crop just like they do with wine in Napa and Sonoma (and in France.) Share the love.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  • Let’s let them legalize first. The U.S. can hide and watch. Let’s see what happens to them. then we can try it.

  • I’m frightened of what a change in the law may do to our part of the world.
    It’s not that I don’t see the misery created by these laws, I do. I have nearly drowned in all that’s wrong with our little society, but that said, I love what we have here.
    It’s an amazing world filled with people who stand against the world together. Bold, strong, imaginative people, who were willing to risk everything for a life most people wouldn’t understand.
    The children and grandchildren of those people grew up in this life, and never expected the change that’s coming. To earn a living doing anything else almost surely means leaving here. Something most of us can’t imagine, and many of us are ill equipped for.
    I don’t want to see this. I don’t want to walk down the street past boarded up businesses. I don’t want to see us become winter ghost towns, with nothing but food service jobs, and the lucky few who get to clean motels, or sell magnets with pictures of redwoods on them.
    A plan would be nice.

  • .Dave,What I am seeing is a global change. Legalization talk seems to be sweeping through the trees from South America to Europe to the United States. It is just a matter of time before marijuana becomes legalized here, I think.

    Highboltage, I agree that Humboldt can survive if we have plans in place. One of the things to do is to contact Congressman Ammiano and discuss ways to help Humboldt like restricting the number of plants that it is legal to grow 50, 200 whatever needed in order to keep big corporations out at least for awhile. Also contact our own representatives and ask them to work closely with Ammiano to protect our area.

    Ernie, Read the article on Portugal’s decriminalization of drugs. How many experiments do we need?

    SoHumBorn, I’m scared too. But I know that change is coming. We can plug our ears and sing La La La or we can meet change with a plan. I think we need to restrict the amount of plants grown and maybe use dispensaries instead of convience stores, at least for a few years to give small growers a chance to acclimatize to the new world of legalized pot. (good to have you back!)

  • Guerrilla in the Midst

    Some big corporation will maybe be able to mass market some schwag cigs but it will take years for them to produce really good bud.

    There is no advantage to microbrewed bud. There is no more Train Wreck or Romulan. There is not a Mendocino Joe for this generation. Kush is a gimmick. There are no more elite strains.

    Growers covet strains only because it is difficult to hide a ten thousand plant breeding operation. A guerrilla grower has no R&D department to produce new cultivars. A legalized commercial clone producer could easily create millions of somatic embryos. A legalized commercial breeding business would put Headband to shame.

    I don’t want to see this. I don’t want to walk down the street past boarded up businesses. I don’t want to see us become winter ghost towns, with nothing but food service jobs, and the lucky few who get to clean motels, or sell magnets with pictures of redwoods on them.

    Just as the Gold Rush influenced California’s landscape, so has the “Green Rush.” When it is over, people will pack their bags and move on.

  • Guerrilla.

    I agree that if we don’t plan, the tidal wave will smash this culture into tiny pieces and, of course, change is inevitable but I think we can “surf” the wave if we look for ways to mold legalization and to prepare for it.

  • Kym… The Police/Justice/Prison system is nearly as powerful as the Military Industrial complex of the cold war. I predict a huge anti legalization movement and at least ten years of political bull. Decriminalization maybe, but legalization is a long way off.

  • Ben, you are right about the Legal system having a vested interest in keeping marijuana illegal. But California is living proof of what a mess criminalization of drugs costs society. Even the most hard core conservatives are looking at the price and saying, “this isn’t cost effective!” Maybe I’m being too hopeful but I don’t thinking planning is ever entirely wasted.

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