Six Rivers National Forest Sells ‘Little Jones Creek Timber Sale’ to Trinity River Lumber Company

This is a press release from the Six Rivers National Forest:

United States Forest Service USFSEUREKA, Calif. – Michael A. Green, acting forest supervisor for the Six Rivers National Forest, has announced that the Little Jones Creek Timber Sale on the Gasquet Ranger District/Smith River National Recreation Area was sold to Trinity River Lumber Company of Weaverville, California. The sale volume is about 3 million board feet with an estimated weight of 17,600 tons.

The material will be processed at the North Fork Lumber sawmill in Korbel, California. “The size of the timber is perfectly suited for the Korbel operation,” said sawmill manager Russ Dorvall.

The timber sale is just one component of the 840-acre Little Jones Creek Pilot Project, which was initiated in partnership with the Smith River Collaborative. This integrated vegetation and fuels management project will restore habitats by promoting stand development in plantations (previously harvested stands); reduce hazardous fuel buildup along roads to create strategic fuelbreaks, which will assist firefighters during wildfires; and reduce the potential for extreme wildfire conditions in the area, all while providing employment opportunities, commercial timber products, and firewood.

The Smith River Collaborative is a joint venture between local tribes (Elk Valley Rancheria and the Tolowa Dee-ni′ Nation), Del Norte County elected officials, local and regional environmental groups (Friends of Del Norte, Klamath Forest Alliance, EPIC, KS Wild, and Smith River Alliance), the Del Norte Fire Safe Council, and the American Forest Resource Council, working in partnership with Six Rivers National Forest leadership. The collaborative was dedicated to developing a project focused on thinning plantations to promote habitat restoration, as well as treating hazardous fuels to help protect private property and federal land in the event of a wildfire.

For more detailed project information, visit www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51545.

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6 comments

  • >”The sale volume is about 3 million board feet”

    That would keep a lumber mill running for about 10-14 days.

  • Pirates of the rural being

    What kind of environmental degradation happens when 3 million board feet get extracted? I’ve seen the community forest Frisbee golf course still looks like an war zone 2 years later.
    Yea, yea. I need the paper to wipe my ass. Til I get one of those fancy bidets.

  • The mono-culture plantations were the stupidest idea the forest service ever came up with and I have never seen one that was managed in any way so they are dense canopy fires to provide ladder fuel to the older stands, I have one on my access road right next to virgin old growth. Totally sterile forest, they can’t even support mushrooms. They started thinning them mechanically near my place and it is going to end up being something really nice.

  • More mismanaged even age stand is what we’ll probably get.

    • Mismanaged yes, but you can’t do any worse than it was. At least there will be 40×40 tree spacing instead of 6×6 at 30 years and food and habitat for critters. It seems like the best possible plan for mismanagement.

  • Mrs. Wendell S. Truggmann III

    Good for Trinity River Lumber! Dee Sanders and his top flight RPFs know what this business is all about….what’s left of it. Ever wonder why there are SO many Marijuana Black Market ops in Trinity Co. ….and Humboldt and also Mendocino?? Displaced sawmill workers and loggers had few options to turn to after the Sierra Club finagled the Spotted Owl Crisis and the Eco – Groovies (sans Science) bought it all. Trinity River Lumber is one of the few legit commercial wage payers left in T County…for good reason: forest lands are ALWAYS more productive when managed scientifically…and more fire-safe. Sweet dreams naysayers…..! Where will you turn when the fires hit you? We ALL pay our fire insurance here in the Wildlands. And we know it’s not a fail-safe….; but we choose to live here for many reasons.

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