Is the Lovely Lassic Lupine Endangered? CDFW Wants Your Help

Lassics lupine,

A rare Lassics lupine, candidate for endangered listing by FGC in 2017.[Photo by Jeb Bjerke provided by CDFW]

Press release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW):

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is seeking information relevant to a proposal to list the Lassics lupine (Lupinus constancei) as an endangered species.

There are two known populations of the Lassics lupine, both within Six Rivers National Forest. The largest population occurs on Mt. Lassic, within Mt. Lassic Wilderness in Humboldt County. A smaller population occurs on Red Lassic, which is in Trinity County and outside Mt. Lassic Wilderness.

In July 2016, a petition to formally list Lassics lupine as endangered under the California Endangered Species Act was submitted to the California Fish and Game Commission. The listing petition described a variety of threats to the survival of Lassics lupine, including forest encroachment, small mammal seed predation, fire, climate change and off-road vehicles. The Commission followed CDFW’s recommendation and voted to advance the species to candidacy on Feb. 8, 2017. The Commission published findings of this decision on Feb. 24, 2017, triggering a 12-month period during which CDFW will conduct a status review to inform the Commission’s decision on whether to list the species.

As part of the status review process, CDFW is soliciting information from the public regarding Lassics lupine ecology, genetics, life history, distribution, abundance, habitat, the degree and immediacy of threats to reproduction or survival, adequacy of existing management and recommendations for management of the species. Comments, data and other information can be submitted in writing to:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Native Plant Program
1416 Ninth Street, 12th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814

Comments may also be submitted by email to nativeplants@wildlife.ca.gov. If submitting comments by email, please include “Lassics Lupine” in the subject heading.

All comments received by Sept. 8, 2017 will be evaluated prior to submission of the CDFW report to the Commission. Receipt of the report will be placed on the agenda for the next available meeting of the Commission after delivery, and the report will be made available to the public at that time. Following receipt of the CDFW report, the Commission will allow a 30-day public comment period prior to taking any action on CDFW’s recommendation.

The listing petition and CDFW’s petition evaluation for Lassics lupine are available at www.fgc.ca.gov/CESA/index.aspx#ll.

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8 comments

  • Gently trowel a large circle around the base of the plant, being careful not to dig into the roots. Now gently dig deeper until the entire root ball can be lifted safely. Being careful to contain all the soil surrounding the root, gently place it into a burlap lined pail. Transport to a greenhouse and carefully tend to it. Water it as needed, nourish it as needed.
    You will be able to take shoots off it, and start new sprouts, once it is ready.
    Plant the new sprouts once they have grown to a certain size.
    Once the plants are thriving, and their likes and dislikes are recorded, carefully transplant a percentage of your nursery back into the wilds. Check on them every few days, record their progress. Change things up as needed, to suit.
    Problem solved.

    • Very good thing to do if it works.

    • “Gently trowel a large circle around the base of the plant, being careful not to dig into the roots. Now gently dig deeper until the entire root ball can be lifted safely. ”

      Not the best advice.

      Here’s the real deal:
      https://www.planetnatural.com/growing-lupine/

      To grow from cuttings, take a stem down to the trunk, including a bit of its “footprint” connection to the trunk. Set in moist, very well-drained, gritty sand or other propagation medium. Keep covered during the propagation period except for several minutes each day to air and and allow the plant to adjust.

      Start cuttings in larger pots that can be transplanted into the outdoors, pot and all, so as not to disturb the roots.

      Do NOT transplant as the long tap root is delicate, and if damaged, the plant will fail.
      Do NOT transplant as the long tap root is delicate, and if damaged, the plant will fail.
      Do NOT transplant as the long tap root is delicate, and if damaged, the plant will fail.

  • Doesn’t look like a Fish or a Wildlife no does it?
    Fascist bastards.

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