Want a Say on What’s Happening on Local BLM Land? Meetings Are Coming to an Area Near You

Redwood forest

Headwaters [Photo from BLM website]

Press release from the Bureau of Land Management:

The Bureau of Land Management is asking for public comments on issues that should be addressed as it begins developing  a Resource Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement for public lands managed by the Redding and Arcata field offices.

The Northwest California Integrated Resource Management Plan will guide the agency in decision making on these public lands for the next 15 to 20 years. It affects about 400,000 acres of public land in Del Norte, Siskiyou, Shasta, Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, Tehama, and Butte counties.

The NCIP will replace the resource management plans that were put into place in the mid-1990s for both field offices.   It will incorporate current information on the status of the lands and resources managed by BLM.

The BLM will work closely with tribal partners, country governments, and local, state, and federal agencies in developing the new plan.

Comments must be in writing, and will be accepted until Feb. 3, 2017.  Comments may be hand delivered or mailed to the BLM Redding Field Office, 6640 Lockheed Dr., Redding, CA, 96002, or emailed to NCIP_comments@aecom.com. Written comments will also be accepted during the following public meetings.  All meetings are from 5 to 7 p.m.

  • Redding:  Monday, Jan. 9, Civic Center Community Room (Redding City Hall), 777 Cypress Ave.
  • Weaverville: Tuesday, Jan. 10, Veterans Memorial Hall, 103 Memorial Dr.
  • Eureka:  Wednesday, Jan. 11, Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 911 Waterfront Dr.
  • Garberville/Redway: Thursday, Jan. 12, Mateel Community Center, 54 Rusk Ln., Redway
  • Willits:  Tuesday, Jan. 17, Willits City Hall Community Center, 111 Commercial St.
  • Chico:  Wednesday, Jan. 18, Oxford Suites, 2035 Business Ln.
  • Yreka:  Thursday, Jan. 19, Miner’s Inn, 122 E. Miner St.

The BLM will use public comments in drafting the EIS and proposed plan, which will be available for public review and comment.  A final plan will follow.  The process could take up to four years to complete.

The planning area includes a great diversity of lands ranging from north coast beaches and dunes to the Central Valley and Sacramento River, to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

BLM-managed lands provide a wide array of recreational opportunities including wilderness trails, hunting areas, off-highway riding areas, mountain bike trails, and scenic vistas. Public lands support a wide range of uses including mining, timber production, livestock grazing, and firewood collecting and provide habitat for fish and wildlife.

More information is available online at https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-office/eplanning/planAndProjectSite.do?methodName=renderDefaultPlanOrProjectSite&projectId=63960&dctmId=0b0003e880bc935d.

Those with questions can contact Lisa Grudzinski at the BLM Redding Field Office, (530) 224-2140 or lgrudzinski@blm.gov; or David Fuller at the Arcata Field Office, (707) 825-2315 or dfuller@blm.gov.

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10 comments

  • This is a good community related issue to get involved in. Participation, good dialog, and greater understanding regarding use of BLM land in our area is important for future generations.

  • I second that!!!

  • Remember that bust a while back on BLM land near Honeydew. It was thrown out of court because the BLM was in gross error as to the location & legality of the water right which was the basis for their warrant. THEY WERE 100% WRONG

    • I agree. A good example of the BLM’s involvement in “community” is their complicity in the destruction of Sioux lands in North Dakota. Disconnected, bought and sold.
      This call to participate will simply be an exercise in futility. The BLM will do what the Big Shots want while telling the rest of us that it fulfilled the requirements of public notice. Case closed….just like the Willits Overpass. af

  • The Cure-All Medicine

    We should grow the Sacred Herb and our Regulated Cannabis Industry on these lands and heal the planet with our medicine.

  • The BLM is being a bad neighbor consistently. They need to understand that people have the right to grow cannabis on their own land, even if the BLM is on the adjacent parcel. There have been at least two raids destroying legal cannabis on private property which were led by the BLM this year. The effects of these raids are devastating to the families who have their year’s work destroyed, and then face possibly court charges as well (none have been brought yet). If the BLM can’t be good neighbors perhaps they should be gone. Local law enforcement has gone along with these attacks on our community, as if they just can’t stand being outvoted in California. Whether the BLM is a cover for disgruntled Drug Task Force people who don’t respect the law of the state that hired them to enforce it, or is acting out of its own malice, they need to know that we do not want them here if they can not behave properly. I hope community members will show up in large numbers at the Garberville meeting to let the BLM know we are fed up with them.

    • That’s ironic since the all bad neighbors who can’t behave properly and that I am fed up with are pot growers. You want to talk devastation? I can show you plenty of it, and it is coming from pot growers, not the BLM.

  • I confess, I have concerns like the other commenters do.
    This chain of letters has disturbed many officials. https://wikileaks.org/podesta-emails/emailid/44878

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