[UPDATE 6:25 p.m.–250 Acres and 12% Contained] Horse Fire: Day Three

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Fire burns in the remote King Range. [Photo provided by Cal Fire]

As the Humboldt Lightning Complex began to wind down these last few days, the Horse Fire burst out in the King Range about six miles northeast of Shelter Cove. The Cal Fire base that was being demobilized at the Eel River Camp had to reactivate.

The latest update (accurate as of last night) is that the fire has burned 250 acres and is only 5% contained. No structures are threatened or evacuations planned.  The terrain is extremely rugged.

Laura Coleman, a Cal Fire spokesperson, called it, “STEEP STEEP STEEP.” She pointed out that it was extremely hard to access.

“Dozers are improving trails and roads for a larger box contingency,” she said. They hope to contain the fire within these trails. “[B]ut because this is in Wilderness BLM [land,] we will not be using dozers on other areas,” she explained.  Then she added, “[A]nd it is too steep for them anyways.”

A new Type 1 management team will be transitioning in today and taking over command from our local team at 10 a.m.today.

The rugged terrain on the Horse Fire makes fighting it difficult. [Photo from Cal Fire]

The rugged terrain on the Horse Fire makes fighting it difficult. [Photo from Cal Fire]

 UPDATE 8:54 a.m.: The fire is now listed as 10% contained. Here’s a map of the coordinates give by Cal Fire.

UPDATE 10:07 a.m.: Cheryl Anthony of Shelter Cove Fire says, there are approximately 300 firefighters now battling the blaze. Tonight, gusty winds are predicted which could cause problems for the crews.

UPDATE 3 p.m.:

More photos of the blaze were provided by Cal Fire. Here’s the map also.

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UPDATE 6:25 p.m.:

https://twitter.com/CAL_FIRE/status/634529165690204160

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18 comments

  • Best of luck to these teams.
    I remember going to the top of one on the top to bottom trails at or near Saddle Mt., looked down the first part, checked the topo map and said, ” Nope, I don’t think so “. Very intimidating.

    • In that kind of terrain it’s almost impossible to stop once it starts burning uphill,
      it looks to me like they hopped over the ridge and lit a backfire. We used to do “Controlled” lol Burns like that in Sequoia NP, in same king of vegetation too, manzanita and oak. It was almost my first job out of High School.
      Some of the fires like that above a certain altitude we would sit around and watch it burn,
      just make sure it didn’t get too big.

  • I wonder how it started, being as it is in such a rugged area and no lightning that day?

    • There was something on KMUD last night said during the pledge but I did not get it all other than someone negligently cooking where they should not have.. If it was not at least near a trail it would be mysterious. Otherwise I would think human caused.

    • Well, when you zoom the map the arrow points to Saddle Mt. Road.

    • When we’re in a drought they outta just close all these camping zones. I doubt it generates much money esp compared to the money spent on fires.

    • Definitely a campfire or campstove from a hiker(s). The out-of-towners just don’t get it, how dry it is here (pretty much everywhere) and think cuz they are on the coast they are safe from fires. Hunting season is coming up also and a lot of those guys have campfires in the backcountry, even though signs are posted saying NO CAMPFIRES!

  • My son is on this fire, may God protect him, and ALL the brave men and women fighting these fires……

  • Lost coast Resident

    Just spoke with BLM representative.
    The fire started in the Buck Creek drainage where a trail comes from the “King Crest Trail” parking lot. Many hikers choose this trail as it is the fastest way to get to Big Flat.
    Currently they are working the north side of the fire as it has had no work done till today & is very steep. All water appears to now be coming from water “tenders” who are drawing (at least) out of Bear creek & transporting out King Peak road.
    It is possible that IF the fog clears they MAY use ocean water.That will be BLM’s call.
    There are numerous helicopters and possible 2planes dropping fire retardant.
    They have a hand line and fire hose on the south side along Horse Mountain creek.
    They have opened numerous road on the Saddle Mountain ridge from previous fires. Only old trails or fire roads are used. The concern for all is the anticipated winds this evening and in the coming days. As a long time resident I can say whatever NOAA predicts it is always double that strength on the ridges.
    Wishing us all good luck.

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  • Steep and beautiful country! “That FAR GONA DO WHAT WANTS TA DO, IN THAT KINA CUNTRY. WETHER BEIN WHAT ITIZ AN ALL. YOU FELLARS BE SAFE. SURE DO APPREESHIATE ALL YUR HARD WURK! RAINZA CUMMIN……ITZ JUST A WAZE OFF. GOOD LUK …AN KEEP A EYE OUT FUR EACH OTHUR.”

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  • Does anybody know if the crews are accepting donations (food, snacks, beverages, etc) up at the staging area on Kings PK/Shelter Cove Rd?

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