Hoopa Police Chief Resigns, Humboldt Co. Sheriff and Tribe Discuss Working More Closely

This is a press release from the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council:

The Hoopa Valley Tribal Council met with Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey and members of his staff this morning to discuss the cross-deputizing agreement between the County and the Tribe.“We had a productive meeting with the main concern of ensuring the continuation of effective law enforcement in the Hoopa Valley,” Downey said.The meeting came just three days after the resignation of Hoopa Valley Tribal Police Chief Robert Kane.

Tribal Chairwoman Danielle Vigil-Masten said, “Chief Robert Kane resigned on Friday after working over 20 years for the Hoopa Valley Tribe. We wish him well in his future endeavors, and we appreciate his years of dedication to our tribe.”

The Council appointed Ed Guyer as Interim Chief of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Police on Friday after Kane’s resignation.

Vigil-Masten said, “The Council also approved a resolution at their last meeting to work more closely with the County to help meet the safety and security needs of our community.”

Tribal Police and Humboldt County Sheriff’s Deputies worked closely to respond to two separate incidents that happened over the weekend.

The first was a shooting incident on Saturday, March 21, which left three victims wounded by gunshots. One victim has already been released from the hospital, while two remain in critical condition.

Rodney Ortiz – suspected of being involved in the shooting – was taken into custody on Sunday, March 22 in Eureka.

A second man, Vincent Rudy Ortiz, is being sought as a person of interest in the investigation.

In a second, separate incident, human remains were discovered on Sunday, March 22, in the forest near Pine Creek Road in Hoopa.

Hoopa Tribal Police, Humboldt County Sheriff’s Deputies, and a Humboldt County Coroner responded to the scene. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death and gender of the human remains.

The County Sheriff’s Office will continue to work with Tribal Police, and are increasing the manpower assigned to help protect the Hoopa Valley on a continuous basis.”

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