Eat Me?

 

Alice had cake that said, “eat me” and a caterpillar that told her which side of the mushroom to nibble but I don’t have anyone who can tell me  whether this creamy looking little mushroom is edible.

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10 comments

  • Nevah eata Amanita…. This one is not an Amanita as it has brown rather than white gills… probably Agaricus which has several excellent edibles including the mushrooms we buy in markets…. HOWEVER… some can make us quite sick. If you put a drop of potassium hydroxide (you have some, of course?) on the mushroom and it turns yellow it’s a problem. If it smells sorta like hot plastic , it’s a problem… Where’s Wayne when we need him?

  • Nevah eata Amanita…. This one is not an Amanita as it has brown rather than white gills… probably Agaricus which has several excellent edibles including the mushrooms we buy in markets…. HOWEVER… some can make us quite sick. If you put a drop of potassium hydroxide (you have some, of course?) on the mushroom and it turns yellow it’s a problem. If it smells sorta like hot plastic , it’s a problem… Where’s Wayne when we need him?

  • P.S…. If it smells like almonds… give it to me…!

  • P.S…. If it smells like almonds… give it to me…!

  • I used to have a mushroom hunters guide, but I still never trusted it or my judgment enough to try eating any wild mushrooms. The only exception being puffballs which are pretty much unmistakable.

  • I used to have a mushroom hunters guide, but I still never trusted it or my judgment enough to try eating any wild mushrooms. The only exception being puffballs which are pretty much unmistakable.

  • I am a novice mushroom hunter, I have a few that i know without a doubt are safe. Chantrells, oysters, blacktrumpets ect. I dont know this one. I agree with Ben that it is not an amineta tho. There are just too many possibilitys to tell from a picture alone. I think i may have found it in “Mushrooms demistified” by David Arora. A meadow or field mushroom; pg. 318 or picture #71. Always folow the simple ruel. If you dont know it, dont eat it! If I want to try a new wild mushroom I will identify it to the best of my ability AND bring it to someone who knows mushrooms better than i do to be sure. Happy hunting!!! The time in the woods is reason enough but there are so many tasty things to find how could you not get out there 🙂

  • I am a novice mushroom hunter, I have a few that i know without a doubt are safe. Chantrells, oysters, blacktrumpets ect. I dont know this one. I agree with Ben that it is not an amineta tho. There are just too many possibilitys to tell from a picture alone. I think i may have found it in “Mushrooms demistified” by David Arora. A meadow or field mushroom; pg. 318 or picture #71. Always folow the simple ruel. If you dont know it, dont eat it! If I want to try a new wild mushroom I will identify it to the best of my ability AND bring it to someone who knows mushrooms better than i do to be sure. Happy hunting!!! The time in the woods is reason enough but there are so many tasty things to find how could you not get out there 🙂

  • Sounds like there is some interest to have mushroom forays up in Humboldt. I’m sure some of the fungophiles from up north would come down to SoHum to find some with you all. Doesn’t seem to be an organized club, but you could probably find a mycologist at HSU who could take you out and help you beef up your confidence identifying mushrooms. The key is to find good habitat, on property you can collect on, like forest service or from lumber co. permission.

    You can actually get pretty far using the keys in demystified, but I like to have an expert ID a specimen for me before I grab them on my own. That one does look like a typical white button mushroom, but there are about 5 features used to accurately ID a mushroom, and I can only glean about 2 or 3 from pictures.

  • Sounds like there is some interest to have mushroom forays up in Humboldt. I’m sure some of the fungophiles from up north would come down to SoHum to find some with you all. Doesn’t seem to be an organized club, but you could probably find a mycologist at HSU who could take you out and help you beef up your confidence identifying mushrooms. The key is to find good habitat, on property you can collect on, like forest service or from lumber co. permission.

    You can actually get pretty far using the keys in demystified, but I like to have an expert ID a specimen for me before I grab them on my own. That one does look like a typical white button mushroom, but there are about 5 features used to accurately ID a mushroom, and I can only glean about 2 or 3 from pictures.

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