Fan of Hank Sims

Former editor of the North Coast Journal and writer of the beloved Town Dandy column, Hank Sims has his own shining new Lost Coast blog.

This first page combines his own inimitable writing with excerpts from KHUM’s interviews recorded.  Mike Dronkers interviews Humboldt State Public Information Officer Jarad Petroske about the current bomb threat at HSU. (UPDATE: HSU has given the all clear on the bomb threat and buildings are reopening.)

Welcome back, Hank.  We missed you. http://yfrog.com/h7qycwnj (Via Amy Stewart‘s twitter feed)

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19 comments

  • Cheers, Kim!

  • Isn’t it Kym?
    Hank, are you already losing your editor chops? 😉

  • Isn’t it Kym?
    Hank, are you already losing your editor chops? 😉

  • Hank,
    Thanks for telling it like it is in your March 15 piece in the TS!
    The OD scene is way out of control.

    Bob

  • Hank,
    Thanks for telling it like it is in your March 15 piece in the TS!
    The OD scene is way out of control.

    Bob

  • OD = Outdoor
    When the whole east coast is flooded with N.Cali Outdoor, we got a problem.
    Check any herb website… Back east growers are feeling the “market glut” and are pissed. Bottom line calling Humboldt OD the new beasters.= to mid-low grade BC bud.

  • OD = Outdoor
    When the whole east coast is flooded with N.Cali Outdoor, we got a problem.
    Check any herb website… Back east growers are feeling the “market glut” and are pissed. Bottom line calling Humboldt OD the new beasters.= to mid-low grade BC bud.

  • Bob,

    I’m a little confused about what you’re saying. Are you saying that Northern California outdoor growers are growing too much and that’s why the price is low? If so, I guess I’d have to agree that increasing production up here probably does have some effect on prices around the country…but probably not much. The statistics I’ve see over the last few years suggest that the “Emerald Triangle” of Humboldt, Mendecino, and Trinity don’t really account for all that much production, compared to the more populous counties down south. And of course the huge amount of indoor growing, and expansion of growing in other states (especially Colorado, but others too) are probably much more important factors in the current “glut.” So even if all the growers in the Emerald Triangle responded to the glut by cutting their crops in half, it probably wouldn’t make any significant difference in terms of pushing the price back up, and meanwhile they’d have only half the product to sell at the still-low prices.

    But I do agree that people should not just blindly grow twice as much every year in a vain effort to make up for the lower prices — not because I think our little corner of the country is really contributiing all that much to the glut, but because I think the “biggering and biggering” strategy is just not going to work out for much longer as the prices continue to slide. I think people should look to develop other skills and life plans, rather than continuing to be over-reliant on ganja growing.

    Personally, I think the overall supply of ganja in the country is not really something we up here in Humboldt have any real control over at this point. Despite our reputation, we’re really just a drop in the bucket. So, to those of you out there who make your living exclusively by growing ganja, my advice would be to lower your expectations, learn to grow more efficiently, and develop a Plan B (and maybe some Plans C, D, and E) for how you are going to support yourself when the price drops far enough that your profit margin (if any) becomes to slim to sustain you.

  • Bob,

    I’m a little confused about what you’re saying. Are you saying that Northern California outdoor growers are growing too much and that’s why the price is low? If so, I guess I’d have to agree that increasing production up here probably does have some effect on prices around the country…but probably not much. The statistics I’ve see over the last few years suggest that the “Emerald Triangle” of Humboldt, Mendecino, and Trinity don’t really account for all that much production, compared to the more populous counties down south. And of course the huge amount of indoor growing, and expansion of growing in other states (especially Colorado, but others too) are probably much more important factors in the current “glut.” So even if all the growers in the Emerald Triangle responded to the glut by cutting their crops in half, it probably wouldn’t make any significant difference in terms of pushing the price back up, and meanwhile they’d have only half the product to sell at the still-low prices.

    But I do agree that people should not just blindly grow twice as much every year in a vain effort to make up for the lower prices — not because I think our little corner of the country is really contributiing all that much to the glut, but because I think the “biggering and biggering” strategy is just not going to work out for much longer as the prices continue to slide. I think people should look to develop other skills and life plans, rather than continuing to be over-reliant on ganja growing.

    Personally, I think the overall supply of ganja in the country is not really something we up here in Humboldt have any real control over at this point. Despite our reputation, we’re really just a drop in the bucket. So, to those of you out there who make your living exclusively by growing ganja, my advice would be to lower your expectations, learn to grow more efficiently, and develop a Plan B (and maybe some Plans C, D, and E) for how you are going to support yourself when the price drops far enough that your profit margin (if any) becomes to slim to sustain you.

  • That’s what Im saying Tra,
    I’ve lived in the Triangle since the mid 70’s… nuff said.
    I very much agree with your 3rd paragraph.

    Maybe Hank will be so kind and post his article from March 15, that was in the Times Standard….A pale-green horse….. dark days ahead.

  • That’s what Im saying Tra,
    I’ve lived in the Triangle since the mid 70’s… nuff said.
    I very much agree with your 3rd paragraph.

    Maybe Hank will be so kind and post his article from March 15, that was in the Times Standard….A pale-green horse….. dark days ahead.

  • Hank is leading the way for hybrid journalism in HumCo.

    Three years ago when I started my blog, I made a post regarding hybrid journalism. I was wondering if I was a hybrid journalist because I wrote a column for a print publication and had a blog designed to compliment it. It’s became pretty obvious I wasn’t even close as time went by, and now with Hank’s new career there’s no doubt he’s the pioneer for hybrid journalism up here.

  • Hank is leading the way for hybrid journalism in HumCo.

    Three years ago when I started my blog, I made a post regarding hybrid journalism. I was wondering if I was a hybrid journalist because I wrote a column for a print publication and had a blog designed to compliment it. It’s became pretty obvious I wasn’t even close as time went by, and now with Hank’s new career there’s no doubt he’s the pioneer for hybrid journalism up here.

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