Intellectual Property Rights and Marijuana–A Seminar

 

Above is a picture of bindles of seeds.  Some of the seeds are ones that could be found anywhere.  Some are bred for specific areas.  Many growers here have worked years on perfecting seed stock. But with the legalization or partial legalization that medical marijuana creates, their seed stock might not be protected as theirs.  Some growers are attempting to create brands that reflect their farms or co-ops.  But unless they do it right, they might be working in vain.

A new workshop tomorrow in Berkeley aims to help all those whose inventions, innovations and logos might be vulnerable to annexation by others.  According to the flyer,

The medical marijuana industry is moving from the
shadows to unchartered legitimate legal landscape. From specialty
cannabis shops to licensed dispensaries, medical marijuana brands
are growing like “weeds,” but are these businesses protecting their
most valuable assets in their trademarks, copyrights and other
intellectual property? How can this evolving industry build and protect
powerful brands?

I hope someone from Humboldt is going…

_______________-

 

Thanks to David Downs from East Bay Express who has some of the most comprehensive links to marijuana stories out there.

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3 comments

  • This is an interesting and progressive move forward. This could be the wave of the future. The wave of the business future and of the ‘patented’ industry?

    Locally, one example of this trend might be Mr. Wilson of Natural Green Health Center, who has recently employed Crescent City attorney Mr. Van Hook specializing in Marijuana Agriculture, Business, and Compliance law to develop his Eureka dispensary with an emphasis on research, development, and proprietary information. They are (perhaps?) looking into possible patents and intellectual rights, future veterinary applications, and marijuana strains with CBD’s– chemicals that don’t necessarily get you high but have a greater propensity for pain relief.

    More information– informally written, please– on this local development and of Mr. Wilson can be found here.

    I hope Humboldt is going to be represented in Berkeley, Kym. If it’s important and revelant, not being there could be a big loss. I’d like to know more of these CBD’s, too, and if the those strains can be patented.

    Our righteously reasonable and accurate observer Tra also reports Bay Area dispensaries having these special CBD strains be in high demand commanding higher prices (no pun intended, Kym!).

  • A few comments about CBDs. First of all, I should state that I only heard second-hand about the higher prices and demand for high-CBD strains. But I did hear it from two different people who had been down there, a couple of months apart.

    Second, I believe all strains have CBDs as well as THC, they just vary in terms of how much of each.

    Third, apparently what part of the plant you consume, and how you consume it, has a major effect on how much of the CBDs you get versus how much THC. If I’m remembering correctly, eating (or more palatably, juicing and drinking) the leaves gives you CBDs and almost no THC. I believe eating (or drinking) the raw buds also yields a lot of CBDs and not very much THC. But eating cooked edibles, or smoking the buds, gives you much less in the way of CBDs and while delivering lots of THC.

    Fourth, just to be clear, it’s not a matter of CBDs good / THC bad. For some medical conditions, the THC may provide the benefit that’s needed. For example, I think that in the case of AIDS or cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and having trouble with nausea and lack of appetite, that the THC is important, since that’s what’s responsible for the appetite stimulation (“the munchies”), and maybe the related reduction in nausea, too. So it all depends on what your symptoms and your underlying condition is. As they always say on TV , “ask your doctor.”

  • A few comments about CBDs. First of all, I should state that I only heard second-hand about the higher prices and demand for high-CBD strains. But I did hear it from two different people who had been down there, a couple of months apart.

    Second, I believe all strains have CBDs as well as THC, they just vary in terms of how much of each.

    Third, apparently what part of the plant you consume, and how you consume it, has a major effect on how much of the CBDs you get versus how much THC. If I’m remembering correctly, eating (or more palatably, juicing and drinking) the leaves gives you CBDs and almost no THC. I believe eating (or drinking) the raw buds also yields a lot of CBDs and not very much THC. But eating cooked edibles, or smoking the buds, gives you much less in the way of CBDs and while delivering lots of THC.

    Fourth, just to be clear, it’s not a matter of CBDs good / THC bad. For some medical conditions, the THC may provide the benefit that’s needed. For example, I think that in the case of AIDS or cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and having trouble with nausea and lack of appetite, that the THC is important, since that’s what’s responsible for the appetite stimulation (“the munchies”), and maybe the related reduction in nausea, too. So it all depends on what your symptoms and your underlying condition is. As they always say on TV , “ask your doctor.”

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