News from SoHum (and a Bit Beyond)

These are photos of the county road towards Shelter Cove just outside of Whitmore Grove. Briceland Road is open only to one way traffic and looks like it will be that way for some time.

Kim Sallaway who took these great photos says,”I suspect Briceland Road drivers will have to deal with this slide in Whittemore Grove for a long time.
If it lasts until they get to the repairs. It is really undercut and the creek is high and mighty. Other trees are in danger of falling at the same location.
This is pretty bad.” (See more of Kim’s amazing photos here.)

Ben Schill sent me this link so we can monitor the Eel’s flood level here.

And he sent me this one for those who want to monitor Radiation levels on the West Coast.

UPDATE:  More Photos and description of the Briceland Rd.


Kim sent these two photos later on and added, “The logs at the top are alongside the west bound lane. The redwood is the one standing on the other side of the roadway. Between them lies 1 lane of traffic and a heck of an undercut. The pavement is suspended in the air. I got off it after I realized it had no support at all and the drop is straight down. It would be worst case scenario for me instantly. This place is really dangerous right now.”

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9 comments

  • I heard the CalTrans Fairy visited in the middle of the night and pushed those trees over. The CalTrans Fairy controls the winds, you know.

    Hey, are all the city-level radiation pages on the EPA’s website supposed to have blank boxes where radiation levels are reported, or did the browser fairy visit me?

  • Seems like Cal-Trans or who ever controls that area would limit weight loads?

    • The county is in charge of that stretch of road. I’m not sure of their policy.

      • As I understand it the State Park is responsible for the road through the State Park where the trees fell over and the road washed out. Neither CalTrans or Humboldt Co. Road Department have responsibility to repair that section of road. The State Parks does. Hope the State Park people don’t cut any redwood roots during the repair though (laughing out loud as State Parks shouldn’t be in charge of road repair in this section but they are so we will have to see how good of a job our State Park can do without cutting any roots).

        • Cutting redwood roots for roads referenced above was a Humboldt County joke (lmao). Hope the road is fixed soon. Be interesting what decisions State Parks and Fish and Game makes for the trees in Redwood Creek that are creating fish and salamander habitat versus the value of modifying the logjam to keep the road from washing out (or the jam washing down into the bridge and taking it out in the next flood) at some cost to the biological productivity of Redwood Creek. Balancing the need for a road system for our community against the biological productivity in our watershed (salmon and steelhead) populations is a Yin/Yang’ism.

  • Seems like Cal-Trans or who ever controls that area would limit weight loads?

    • The county is in charge of that stretch of road. I’m not sure of their policy.

      • As I understand it the State Park is responsible for the road through the State Park where the trees fell over and the road washed out. Neither CalTrans or Humboldt Co. Road Department have responsibility to repair that section of road. The State Parks does. Hope the State Park people don’t cut any redwood roots during the repair though (laughing out loud as State Parks shouldn’t be in charge of road repair in this section but they are so we will have to see how good of a job our State Park can do without cutting any roots).

        • Cutting redwood roots for roads referenced above was a Humboldt County joke (lmao). Hope the road is fixed soon. Be interesting what decisions State Parks and Fish and Game makes for the trees in Redwood Creek that are creating fish and salamander habitat versus the value of modifying the logjam to keep the road from washing out (or the jam washing down into the bridge and taking it out in the next flood) at some cost to the biological productivity of Redwood Creek. Balancing the need for a road system for our community against the biological productivity in our watershed (salmon and steelhead) populations is a Yin/Yang’ism.

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