Cooperative Fire Management: King Range Lecture Series

Come join our FREE public lectures series!

All lectures will be given on Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. and will be held at one of the following locations:


BLM King Range Project Office                           Healy Senior Center

768 Shelter Cove Road                                         456 Briceland Road

Whitethorn, CA                                                          Redway, CA


Call the BLM King Range Project Office at 707-986-5415 or email Rachel_Sowards@blm.gov to sign up.

DATE TOPIC LOCATION PRESENTERS
Mar 1 Cooperative Fire Management* BLM King Range Office Tim Jones
Mar 15 Fish of the Lost Coast Healy Senior Center Dave Fuller
Mar 29 King Range Birds of Prey* BLM King Range Office Jesse Irwin

*Indicates hands-on activity.

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15 comments

  • At least that picture looks nice and warm.

  • There are some small small grants available to assist local residents for fire clearing around their houses. The Mattole Restoration Council and the Southern Fire Safe Council are administering the money. I think up to $2,000 per household is available? Contact them if you are interested in making your homested more fire safe BEFORE fire season. Remember the Canoe Fire? Until we get our watersheds back to a condition where we rejoice in seeing them burn, like the not so bad old days, we need to actively manage our fuel loading and fuel continuity regimes. A good place to start is in your own back yard; and with the grant money you can get paid to do the work too.

    And a side note to the Mattole Restoration Council and the Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council, you need to ADVERTISE the grant money in the local press, like KMUD, the Independant, KHUM, and the Redwood Times. And some posters around town wouldn’t hurt either. GET THE WORD OUT.

    During Winter fire season may be containedin the wood stove, but in August and September fire season is in the forest and meadows. Remember Canoe Fire?

    Off to cut some fire wood myself today. Stay warm everyone, and remember, fire season is just around the corner.

    • Harry, thanks for pointing out the grants. Some folk in our watershed are using them and seem pretty happy with the results.

      • Dave Kahan was interviewed on Thursday KMUD News about the cost share programs and you can listen to the archived information on the website KMUD.org. So the word and work is getting out. Daniel Stein (923-2103) is the contact for Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council and you can go to the Mattole Restoration Council website for the Mattole funding. I don’t know if funding still exists, but the money is well spent for making our communities more “fire safe”. The KMUD interview explains the type of fuel treatments covered by the program. Oak woodland restoration is covered too, I think. We are losing our meadows to brush/fir tree invasion. Svenson’s Ridge Meadow, in Lower Salmon Creek, has been pretty much swallowed up since the 1950’s by brush (now a hardwood forest) and fir trees. Pretty amazing to watch meadows disappear in my short life time living on the creek. Fire exclusion has allowed tree seedlings and brush to swallow up our oak woodlands and meadowlands. Reintroduction of fire is a cost effective way of protecting meadows and oak woodlands, when “done right”. Fire also helps with basket material abundance and quality, for basket weavers in our area……fire is a tool for watershed health.

  • There are some small small grants available to assist local residents for fire clearing around their houses. The Mattole Restoration Council and the Southern Fire Safe Council are administering the money. I think up to $2,000 per household is available? Contact them if you are interested in making your homested more fire safe BEFORE fire season. Remember the Canoe Fire? Until we get our watersheds back to a condition where we rejoice in seeing them burn, like the not so bad old days, we need to actively manage our fuel loading and fuel continuity regimes. A good place to start is in your own back yard; and with the grant money you can get paid to do the work too.

    And a side note to the Mattole Restoration Council and the Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council, you need to ADVERTISE the grant money in the local press, like KMUD, the Independant, KHUM, and the Redwood Times. And some posters around town wouldn’t hurt either. GET THE WORD OUT.

    During Winter fire season may be containedin the wood stove, but in August and September fire season is in the forest and meadows. Remember Canoe Fire?

    Off to cut some fire wood myself today. Stay warm everyone, and remember, fire season is just around the corner.

    • Harry, thanks for pointing out the grants. Some folk in our watershed are using them and seem pretty happy with the results.

      • Dave Kahan was interviewed on Thursday KMUD News about the cost share programs and you can listen to the archived information on the website KMUD.org. So the word and work is getting out. Daniel Stein (923-2103) is the contact for Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council and you can go to the Mattole Restoration Council website for the Mattole funding. I don’t know if funding still exists, but the money is well spent for making our communities more “fire safe”. The KMUD interview explains the type of fuel treatments covered by the program. Oak woodland restoration is covered too, I think. We are losing our meadows to brush/fir tree invasion. Svenson’s Ridge Meadow, in Lower Salmon Creek, has been pretty much swallowed up since the 1950’s by brush (now a hardwood forest) and fir trees. Pretty amazing to watch meadows disappear in my short life time living on the creek. Fire exclusion has allowed tree seedlings and brush to swallow up our oak woodlands and meadowlands. Reintroduction of fire is a cost effective way of protecting meadows and oak woodlands, when “done right”. Fire also helps with basket material abundance and quality, for basket weavers in our area……fire is a tool for watershed health.

  • I noticed the lecture series are on Tuesdays. Too bad for people that work during the week. Weekends would be better for some of us, but the topics all sound great!

    • 7 PM in the evening seems convenient. I should read before I post?

      • This was a great fire simulation exercise and I’m glad I went. This exercise is going to be a great educational tool for our local schools, HROP, volunteer fire departments and for helping to build fire awareness for local residents for sure. Good job on developing this educational tool BLM! Brought back personal memories of the Canoe Fire, for me at least, and the complexities of management decisions that have to be made during fires in our local communities. This exercise should be a part of every fire school, and is in the development stage at present. Very cool indeed!

  • I noticed the lecture series are on Tuesdays. Too bad for people that work during the week. Weekends would be better for some of us, but the topics all sound great!

    • 7 PM in the evening seems convenient. I should read before I post?

      • This was a great fire simulation exercise and I’m glad I went. This exercise is going to be a great educational tool for our local schools, HROP, volunteer fire departments and for helping to build fire awareness for local residents for sure. Good job on developing this educational tool BLM! Brought back personal memories of the Canoe Fire, for me at least, and the complexities of management decisions that have to be made during fires in our local communities. This exercise should be a part of every fire school, and is in the development stage at present. Very cool indeed!

  • Thanks for the review. It’s good to know that there is information out there (even if I don’t have time to gather it all.)

  • Thanks for the review. It’s good to know that there is information out there (even if I don’t have time to gather it all.)

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