$40 Per Ounce

Will buds soon be worth less than leaves are now?

One of the  owners of the new mega marijuana factory farms just legalized in Oakland is looking forward to a day of being the Trader Joe’s of weed.  Jeff Wilcox says, “The new Two Buck Chuck will be $40 an ounce pot.”

I doubt with taxation that prices will drop that low but…?  Go here for an excellent read on this subject.

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Hat tip to Cannabis news for this piece.

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37 comments

  • Wow, this is big. I guess it may actually happen.

    • yep- and the quality will drop as well. To hell with a way to have small farmers making a livable wage. This corporate crap will be loaded with chemicals. Doubt they invest 6 grand for a gs-mc to show what the medicine consists if. I wouldn’t smoke/digest the shit if you gave it to me. I will only purchase from dispensaries who use local growers who can prove what is in the medicine itself. You think pharmaceuticals are cheap? no- why not? MM is way cheaper! This asshole is cornering the market plain and simple and eventually the THC content will be 2%. Berkley’s city council should be dragged in the streets and shot.

  • Wow, this is big. I guess it may actually happen.

    • yep- and the quality will drop as well. To hell with a way to have small farmers making a livable wage. This corporate crap will be loaded with chemicals. Doubt they invest 6 grand for a gs-mc to show what the medicine consists if. I wouldn’t smoke/digest the shit if you gave it to me. I will only purchase from dispensaries who use local growers who can prove what is in the medicine itself. You think pharmaceuticals are cheap? no- why not? MM is way cheaper! This asshole is cornering the market plain and simple and eventually the THC content will be 2%. Berkley’s city council should be dragged in the streets and shot.

  • this is really gonna suck ,fuck !, i`m gonna have to look for a new job?? ! maybe i should vote no ?? {this is really starting to look like what growers originally thought might happen]don`t want to go to work for anyone. and i`m not good @ takin’ orders all and having a fuckin’ schedule .fuck that !….now i think it `s gonna be takin’over like big tobacco companies . fuckin’ cooperative bullshit !

  • this is really gonna suck ,fuck !, i`m gonna have to look for a new job?? ! maybe i should vote no ?? {this is really starting to look like what growers originally thought might happen]don`t want to go to work for anyone. and i`m not good @ takin’ orders all and having a fuckin’ schedule .fuck that !….now i think it `s gonna be takin’over like big tobacco companies . fuckin’ cooperative bullshit !

  • Paaaaaaranoid.

    If you think your weed isn’t that much better than AgraMed $40 zips, then you will prolly go broke, the cannabis industry won’t be seeking you out.

    But if your shit is the dosia, you spend months with that perfect pheno in tissue culture, and you already got everything running cheap and efficent, marijuana inc. will be calling.

    It’s simple, step your game up. Fine cigar companies don’t go broke due to the existence of Black and Milds. If the new weed is going to suck like you say, you have nothing to fear.

  • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

    I went to the meeting. It was great meeting you, Kim. Talking to Anna was a refreshing experience as well. Met a bunch of people my first time out in the pot community. Learned alot. here’s what I came away with;

    The public Safety is the first concern. So if we don’t want to get taken over we need to address it. At both the State and local levels the focus is on the value of the crop and associated dangers. Notice the shift in the language to “cultivate” from growing. This helps to turn pot from agriculture to another form of business, one that can be identified as controlled substances specific. As such it would seem that a remote grow away from the house with 24/7 internet driven security, fenced, and reasonably physically secured. Automatic law-enforcement notification and a safe room in the residence is needed and this can be construed as reasonable security. Most of our growers in “The Humboldt Cooperative” don’t want to be taken over. They are quite happy being independent contractors. They all have BOE sellers permits as required by State law. Recent court rulings stated that a grower had a right to deliver to a dispensary, and no limits on amounts grown. remember that? Actually it’s all still a turkey shoot with the application of subjective prosecution criteria used to confuse and threaten us. The current industry operates just fine. It just needs to be reigned in a bit and focused towards orderly compliance in a way that works for all of us and meets the minimum requirements of public safety concerns. We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions. Thank you.

    • Tony, It was good to meet you. I, too, had heard that dispensary sales were legit recently but mel Pearlston seemed pretty clear on his facts. I would like to know what the truth is.

      You said, “We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions” And I wanted to applaud. I agree. That is where Hummap is starting to go. I hope they can get a lot of imput to get them going in the right direction.

      • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

        Hey Kim; Things are never really clear in the grey zone. We have to consider the effects that buying in at this point will cause. For example who is to say that becomming an employee somehow further protects the public safety? Same grow, same farm, but now we have to pay rent on that farm, hire that farmer, pay workers comp and all the other back breaking costs that afflict any business. Put that up against big agro and we all quickly disappear. A guild, or other form such as our cooperative (THC) should suffice to continue as a legal entity as per the spirit and intent of prop 215. Certification of grows and growers by the guild or us would standardize content within the product. Random lab testing and spot checks on the grows would help to keep everyone on task. Our reputation would be built on clean strong product. Rules and safety practices at the grow need to be installed, along with grow insurance obtained by the grower. One things for sure, we have to do this together or we will be picked apart by the high cost of doing business. Another example, lab testing is slow and expensive, so if every pound is analyzed it will cost around $350.00 per assay, down from $600.00 per assay currently, locally. If you run thirty pounds a month through your dispensary that will cost you $10,500.00 a month plus any assay tax or fee that may be installed or attached. In addition to high costs, the slow down will bottleneck product flow. Random samples would work fine, especially if done using statistical analysis methodology. Just how it will end is anybody’s guess. All I know is that what is being propossed or accepted as the truth simply falls in line with the status quo efforts to kill the small farmer. We have a right under prop 215 to plot our own direction, so lets come up with something that will help us all, instead of politely plowing us under. Thanks Kim. Oh I talked to MaryEllen at HPRC and she said we could use her wellness center for a grower meeting on the community assessment. If this is to happen we have to do it soon, otherwise people will speak for us, and do to us, as they wish.

        • Tony,
          Have you talked to HuMMAp about your ideas? I think they would be interested. Keep me informed please.

          • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

            Hey Kim, I have not had a chance to talk to with them yet but I did have a good meeting with Rick and Marlena from the Arcata TV today at Hum Brews over lunch. We talked about my concerns over how the CUA is being twisted by regulatory agencies, and how we can combat that. One things for sure time is slipping away and we need to get our assessment happening soon. I can train folks to do it by watershed but we need to do it now. All we need to do is get together with interested people and do a training so that they can get the requisite information from the growers at different locations and then we can complie the data into usable form. Now’s the time. lets see what we can do. Tony

    • Tony, It was good to meet you. I, too, had heard that dispensary sales were legit recently but mel Pearlston seemed pretty clear on his facts. I would like to know what the truth is.

      You said, “We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions” And I wanted to applaud. I agree. That is where Hummap is starting to go. I hope they can get a lot of input to get them going in the right direction.

  • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

    I went to the meeting. It was great meeting you, Kim. Talking to Anna was a refreshing experience as well. Met a bunch of people my first time out in the pot community. Learned alot. here’s what I came away with;

    The public Safety is the first concern. So if we don’t want to get taken over we need to address it. At both the State and local levels the focus is on the value of the crop and associated dangers. Notice the shift in the language to “cultivate” from growing. This helps to turn pot from agriculture to another form of business, one that can be identified as controlled substances specific. As such it would seem that a remote grow away from the house with 24/7 internet driven security, fenced, and reasonably physically secured. Automatic law-enforcement notification and a safe room in the residence is needed and this can be construed as reasonable security. Most of our growers in “The Humboldt Cooperative” don’t want to be taken over. They are quite happy being independent contractors. They all have BOE sellers permits as required by State law. Recent court rulings stated that a grower had a right to deliver to a dispensary, and no limits on amounts grown. remember that? Actually it’s all still a turkey shoot with the application of subjective prosecution criteria used to confuse and threaten us. The current industry operates just fine. It just needs to be reigned in a bit and focused towards orderly compliance in a way that works for all of us and meets the minimum requirements of public safety concerns. We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions. Thank you.

    • Tony, It was good to meet you. I, too, had heard that dispensary sales were legit recently but mel Pearlston seemed pretty clear on his facts. I would like to know what the truth is.

      You said, “We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions” And I wanted to applaud. I agree. That is where Hummap is starting to go. I hope they can get a lot of imput to get them going in the right direction.

      • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

        Hey Kim; Things are never really clear in the grey zone. We have to consider the effects that buying in at this point will cause. For example who is to say that becomming an employee somehow further protects the public safety? Same grow, same farm, but now we have to pay rent on that farm, hire that farmer, pay workers comp and all the other back breaking costs that afflict any business. Put that up against big agro and we all quickly disappear. A guild, or other form such as our cooperative (THC) should suffice to continue as a legal entity as per the spirit and intent of prop 215. Certification of grows and growers by the guild or us would standardize content within the product. Random lab testing and spot checks on the grows would help to keep everyone on task. Our reputation would be built on clean strong product. Rules and safety practices at the grow need to be installed, along with grow insurance obtained by the grower. One things for sure, we have to do this together or we will be picked apart by the high cost of doing business. Another example, lab testing is slow and expensive, so if every pound is analyzed it will cost around $350.00 per assay, down from $600.00 per assay currently, locally. If you run thirty pounds a month through your dispensary that will cost you $10,500.00 a month plus any assay tax or fee that may be installed or attached. In addition to high costs, the slow down will bottleneck product flow. Random samples would work fine, especially if done using statistical analysis methodology. Just how it will end is anybody’s guess. All I know is that what is being propossed or accepted as the truth simply falls in line with the status quo efforts to kill the small farmer. We have a right under prop 215 to plot our own direction, so lets come up with something that will help us all, instead of politely plowing us under. Thanks Kim. Oh I talked to MaryEllen at HPRC and she said we could use her wellness center for a grower meeting on the community assessment. If this is to happen we have to do it soon, otherwise people will speak for us, and do to us, as they wish.

        • Tony,
          Have you talked to HuMMAp about your ideas? I think they would be interested. Keep me informed please.

          • Dennis A. (Tony) Turner

            Hey Kim, I have not had a chance to talk to with them yet but I did have a good meeting with Rick and Marlena from the Arcata TV today at Hum Brews over lunch. We talked about my concerns over how the CUA is being twisted by regulatory agencies, and how we can combat that. One things for sure time is slipping away and we need to get our assessment happening soon. I can train folks to do it by watershed but we need to do it now. All we need to do is get together with interested people and do a training so that they can get the requisite information from the growers at different locations and then we can complie the data into usable form. Now’s the time. lets see what we can do. Tony

    • Tony, It was good to meet you. I, too, had heard that dispensary sales were legit recently but mel Pearlston seemed pretty clear on his facts. I would like to know what the truth is.

      You said, “We need a community assessment meeting to talk about this and to draft grower driven priorities that we can use to focus our intent, and guide our actions” And I wanted to applaud. I agree. That is where Hummap is starting to go. I hope they can get a lot of input to get them going in the right direction.

  • When it’s legal, i see no reason that a very large outdoor pot farm set up (corporation) can’t and won’t be able to maintain the top quality stains of organic herb.

    • strains

      • Susie,
        I agree with you. Big corporations will hire good growers to farm for them. I do think that the big farms will tend to use less variety of strains and eventually they will choose big producers and breed for their convenience (high yield, low mold) not for flavor etc.

        • With legalization, outdoor corporate grows will dominate the industry. It’s a no-brainer. Nothing will stop them from producing the highest quality products at a price that small growers can’t compete with. They will see to it that they have the marijuana with the best aromas, colors, flavors, etc., and especially the highest THC content –for the lowest price. They won’t be so ignorant as to grow only ‘large producers’ that have a mediocre effect, as Kym suggested. They will supply demand. If you want a certain strain, they will have it, if you want a certain flavor, you’ll will be able to find it at the corner store under their corporate brand-name, cheap. Growing for what you call ‘convenience’ is what many growers do now because of restricted conditions due to illegality. When it’s legal that will be largely eliminated. Unrestricted size of a grow will minimize the considerations the grower now has about yield per plant, yield per square foot, etc. vs quality. Mold won’t be a problem issue outdoors. All in all, big investors will get rich, ‘mom and pop’ will fall between the cracks.

          • They will supply demand. If you want a certain strain, they will have it, if you want a certain flavor, you’ll will be able to find it at the corner store under their corporate brand-name, cheap.

            Hell yea, just like they got Coors IPA and Bud Barley Wine now. Big producers are all about quality and niche markets.

            • Apples and oranges. The difference is that in the field of marijuana it is just as easy and cheap to produce the top grade as it is the mediocre. To get the most desirable marijuana you simply grow clones of those strains. It will be readily available for the public at a lower price than the small grower can compete with.

  • When it’s legal, i see no reason that a very large outdoor pot farm set up (corporation) can’t and won’t be able to maintain the top quality stains of organic herb.

    • strains

      • Susie,
        I agree with you. Big corporations will hire good growers to farm for them. I do think that the big farms will tend to use less variety of strains and eventually they will choose big producers and breed for their convenience (high yield, low mold) not for flavor etc.

        • With legalization, outdoor corporate grows will dominate the industry. It’s a no-brainer. Nothing will stop them from producing the highest quality products at a price that small growers can’t compete with. They will see to it that they have the marijuana with the best aromas, colors, flavors, etc., and especially the highest THC content –for the lowest price. They won’t be so ignorant as to grow only ‘large producers’ that have a mediocre effect, as Kym suggested. They will supply demand. If you want a certain strain, they will have it, if you want a certain flavor, you’ll will be able to find it at the corner store under their corporate brand-name, cheap. Growing for what you call ‘convenience’ is what many growers do now because of restricted conditions due to illegality. When it’s legal that will be largely eliminated. Unrestricted size of a grow will minimize the considerations the grower now has about yield per plant, yield per square foot, etc. vs quality. Mold won’t be a problem issue outdoors. All in all, big investors will get rich, ‘mom and pop’ will fall between the cracks.

          • They will supply demand. If you want a certain strain, they will have it, if you want a certain flavor, you’ll will be able to find it at the corner store under their corporate brand-name, cheap.

            Hell yea, just like they got Coors IPA and Bud Barley Wine now. Big producers are all about quality and niche markets.

            • Apples and oranges. The difference is that in the field of marijuana it is just as easy and cheap to produce the top grade as it is the mediocre. To get the most desirable marijuana you simply grow clones of those strains. It will be readily available for the public at a lower price than the small grower can compete with.

  • I am part of the fourth generation of farmers on the same land in central cali. Four generations of risking everything against the weather, global politics, and just plain endurance to get a crop to market, market it well , and change with the times without losing a beat. We mostly grew wheat and corn when I was young. For around .10cents a pound. A nutritious commodity necessary for the lives of other humans in far away lands, as well as our neighbors. We found a way to live our lives with gusto… and now our community in the redwoods will too! mark

  • I am part of the fourth generation of farmers on the same land in central cali. Four generations of risking everything against the weather, global politics, and just plain endurance to get a crop to market, market it well , and change with the times without losing a beat. We mostly grew wheat and corn when I was young. For around .10cents a pound. A nutritious commodity necessary for the lives of other humans in far away lands, as well as our neighbors. We found a way to live our lives with gusto… and now our community in the redwoods will too! mark

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