Redwinged Blackbird

Early morning at my parents’ pond.

  • Laytonville Rock
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8 comments

  • I’ve never seen one before. Are they rare?

    I wonder how they happen to have those red feathers? Blackbird plus Cardinal = Blackbird with Red Wings?

  • I’ve never seen one before. Are they rare?

    I wonder how they happen to have those red feathers? Blackbird plus Cardinal = Blackbird with Red Wings?

  • K at the bookstore

    I see the redwinged ones flying with the plain black birds. here in Garberville. There was a redwing perched on the bookstore porch yesterday morning, very pretty indeed.

  • K at the bookstore

    I see the redwinged ones flying with the plain black birds. here in Garberville. There was a redwing perched on the bookstore porch yesterday morning, very pretty indeed.

  • Oh, the magical wonders found at Aunt Myrna’s house.

  • Oh, the magical wonders found at Aunt Myrna’s house.

  • That’s surprising that the red-wing and plain (Brewers) blackbirds pack up together in town. Red-wings in particular love water, and one loud fellow keeps his (much plainer brown) harem in our cattails all summer. All the boys in the ‘hood pack up in spring and fall, and visit back and forth in the summer. The girls swarm in big packs, diving into the cattails at sunset, rustling and squawkiing until they’re comfortable.

    One summer our pond was taken over by Brewers blackbirds instead. I find blackbirds to be pretty punky, with amusing attitude, but I thought the Brewers were a little too urban-aggro for our mellow climes, so I’m relieved they haven’t commuted back since. The boys’ territorial call sounds like a high-pitched “Weee Own! Wee Own!” I reply, contemplating the possession/mortgage continuum, “Wee Owe!”

  • That’s surprising that the red-wing and plain (Brewers) blackbirds pack up together in town. Red-wings in particular love water, and one loud fellow keeps his (much plainer brown) harem in our cattails all summer. All the boys in the ‘hood pack up in spring and fall, and visit back and forth in the summer. The girls swarm in big packs, diving into the cattails at sunset, rustling and squawkiing until they’re comfortable.

    One summer our pond was taken over by Brewers blackbirds instead. I find blackbirds to be pretty punky, with amusing attitude, but I thought the Brewers were a little too urban-aggro for our mellow climes, so I’m relieved they haven’t commuted back since. The boys’ territorial call sounds like a high-pitched “Weee Own! Wee Own!” I reply, contemplating the possession/mortgage continuum, “Wee Owe!”

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