High Times Editor Comments on Cannabis Cup and Outdoor Marijuana

Yesterday, High Times announced a Medical Marijuana Cannabis Cup will be held this year in San Francisco.  Today, concerns that the June date might be handicapping outdoor growers spread throughout Humboldt.  In an effort to answer these concerns I contacted David Bienenstock the new West Coast editor at High Times. Bienenstock has proved to be exceptionally friendly to outdoor growers in the past year and has written several pieces about the movement. He responded quickly:

I share everyone’s concerns about supporting outdoor growers. Unfortunately, our already existing cannabis cup in Amsterdam takes place in November, and we’re a very small staff, so we can’t have two events at the same time of year — at least not this year….

We considered having a separate Cup category for outdoor cannabis, and would definitely consider that in the future as well, but I thought that might play into the “outdoor is less potent” mind frame and reinforce the whole indoor stereotype we’re trying to avoid.

The Medical Cannabis Cup will be judged by a small group of experts (about 5) led by Jorge Cervantes, and I will personally instruct them to keep this issue in mind when judging…

I have also spoken to some outdoor growers who think they can cure and store enough from last year to make a great showing….

He asked what people think about whether an cup exclusive for Outdoor pot would be a good idea.  Feel free to put in your two cents.  Mine is that I know indoor growers who buy or grow a bit of outdoor for their own consumption.  I don’t know anybody who does the reverse.  Ergo,  Outdoor is the Kind and will do just fine.

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39 comments

  • Thanks for following this up!

  • Morgan, What do you think about the outdoor cup idea? Better or worse for outdoor growers?

    Anyone who is planning on entering can contact me privately. I would love to follow North Coast pot through the whole process from entering to, of course, winning;> kym kemp @ Starband.net

    • Bienenstock makes an excellent point about a separate category supporting the idea that outdoor cannabis is second to indoor. Separate but equal is not equal. Although the date for this year’s competition is not ideal, this should still be seen as an opportunity to prove outdoor’s worth to the greater populace. Even with the summer date, I know last fall’s harvest can more than hold it’s own. Hopefully the expert panel will prove advantageous, and will be immune to preconceived notions about indoor’s superiority. A win at this cup for outdoor could be a huge step towards educating and changing the market’s tastes.

  • Morgan, What do you think about the outdoor cup idea? Better or worse for outdoor growers?

    Anyone who is planning on entering can contact me privately. I would love to follow North Coast pot through the whole process from entering to, of course, winning;> kym kemp @ Starband.net

    • Bienenstock makes an excellent point about a separate category supporting the idea that outdoor cannabis is second to indoor. Separate but equal is not equal. Although the date for this year’s competition is not ideal, this should still be seen as an opportunity to prove outdoor’s worth to the greater populace. Even with the summer date, I know last fall’s harvest can more than hold it’s own. Hopefully the expert panel will prove advantageous, and will be immune to preconceived notions about indoor’s superiority. A win at this cup for outdoor could be a huge step towards educating and changing the market’s tastes.

  • The sight of a mature cannabis plant gently swishing in the warm afternoon breeze as it inhales that perfect spectrum of sunlight is simply a beautiful thing. Prohibition has created an atmosphere in which that natural beauty has been perverted and a plant which positively revels in the sun is now forced to grow in a closet, nurtured with god knows what until it swells up like a poisoned puppy. It’s simply illogical and because of that I can never completely love indoor weed.

    An outdoor cup would be cool. “Hey, look at this gooey goodness grown with $100 of fertilizer and fence. Have fun paying your $1500 a month electric bill.”

    • I second all of Randy’s points about the beauty of the outdoor plant, the clear advantages that come from the full spectrum of sunlight, the inherent benefits of a more natural growing environment. If the outdoor category emerges, I’d love to see an aesthetic component to the judging. Maybe combine pretty photos of the mature plant (like the one you’ve posted, above) alongside the fruits of its labor.

  • The sight of a mature cannabis plant gently swishing in the warm afternoon breeze as it inhales that perfect spectrum of sunlight is simply a beautiful thing. Prohibition has created an atmosphere in which that natural beauty has been perverted and a plant which positively revels in the sun is now forced to grow in a closet, nurtured with god knows what until it swells up like a poisoned puppy. It’s simply illogical and because of that I can never completely love indoor weed.

    An outdoor cup would be cool. “Hey, look at this gooey goodness grown with $100 of fertilizer and fence. Have fun paying your $1500 a month electric bill.”

    • I second all of Randy’s points about the beauty of the outdoor plant, the clear advantages that come from the full spectrum of sunlight, the inherent benefits of a more natural growing environment. If the outdoor category emerges, I’d love to see an aesthetic component to the judging. Maybe combine pretty photos of the mature plant (like the one you’ve posted, above) alongside the fruits of its labor.

  • Kym,

    I know someone who is thinking about entering (a Humboldt grower). I’ll be going out to his place next week (I’m working on another pot project for publication) and will see if he wants to share his story with you for publication. I’ll tell him to contact you through this web site – or another email address if you’d like.

    Peace

  • Kym,

    I know someone who is thinking about entering (a Humboldt grower). I’ll be going out to his place next week (I’m working on another pot project for publication) and will see if he wants to share his story with you for publication. I’ll tell him to contact you through this web site – or another email address if you’d like.

    Peace

  • I got your email and will be working on it.

  • I got your email and will be working on it.

  • I don’t have an opinion on outdoor vs. indoor. I just love the photo

  • I don’t have an opinion on outdoor vs. indoor. I just love the photo

  • Outdoor has always been kind.

  • Outdoor has always been kind.

  • I’m not all that interested in outdoor vs. indoor arguments, any more than I am about arguments involving specific strains or growing methods. California plants are happy plants, and Humboldt’s outdoor plants are happier than most, at least in my own experience.

    This year’s debate, among growers and everyone else, should be focused on legalization, voter registration and protesting the new wave of medipot prosecutions in Southern California that can be expected to spread north in short order. Who has the best bud is an entertaining but essentially pointless question. Who may smoke it legally is the most important question facing us this year.

    • This discussion should not be confused with arguments over strains and methods; it is one of taking responsibility for the consequences our practices have on the community. Well-founded, thoughtful critiques of market trends and their social and environmental implications are an important part of any valid industry. If cannabis cultivators as a community are to be taken seriously, we must understand our impact. The outdoor vs. indoor debate is integral to this understanding. While this debate and concerns over legalization may be seen as disparate, they are actually closely connected. To be treated legitimately we must treat ourselves legitimately, thinking critically about our actions and their effects.

  • I’m not all that interested in outdoor vs. indoor arguments, any more than I am about arguments involving specific strains or growing methods. California plants are happy plants, and Humboldt’s outdoor plants are happier than most, at least in my own experience.

    This year’s debate, among growers and everyone else, should be focused on legalization, voter registration and protesting the new wave of medipot prosecutions in Southern California that can be expected to spread north in short order. Who has the best bud is an entertaining but essentially pointless question. Who may smoke it legally is the most important question facing us this year.

    • This discussion should not be confused with arguments over strains and methods; it is one of taking responsibility for the consequences our practices have on the community. Well-founded, thoughtful critiques of market trends and their social and environmental implications are an important part of any valid industry. If cannabis cultivators as a community are to be taken seriously, we must understand our impact. The outdoor vs. indoor debate is integral to this understanding. While this debate and concerns over legalization may be seen as disparate, they are actually closely connected. To be treated legitimately we must treat ourselves legitimately, thinking critically about our actions and their effects.

  • Have a cup-worthy outdoor that is still semi-fresh?

    Storing Food with Argon

    You can also use argon gas to save wine

  • Have a cup-worthy outdoor that is still semi-fresh?

    Storing Food with Argon

    You can also use argon gas to save wine

  • Preservation can be accomplished with only a mason jar, argon chargers, a “cracker,” and a balloon. Head shops sell the cracker/balloon for nitrous oxide chargers. Argon chargers themselves can be purchased on the internet.

    Wear gloves (the first step is freezing cold). Use a large, sturdy balloon. Crack the argon into the balloon. Let the contents of the balloon warm up and then slowly release the gas into the jar. One charger is enough for a small jar while $10 worth of chargers can be used for a large jar. Seal the jar and you’re done. The wine preserver I linked to eliminates the frozen hands step.

    The argon gas displaces the air and settles to the bottom. If the layer of argon is enough to cover the herb, the herb’s decay rate will be slowed to a crawl. Unlike wine, you don’t lose your gas layer when partaking. To keep the gas layer in place, store the container upright and use chopsticks to remove pieces. You should occasionally replenish the argon if you open the jar frequently.

    Argon is heavier than oxygen and carbon dioxide. If you fill a container with argon, other gases will be pushed to the top. This should not be done before the herb cures. When curing, the idea is to cycle the ethylene (“burping”). When storing, the idea is to freeze the cure in time.

    • Kushboldt,

      Thanks for describing the process. I feel so uneducated sometimes and I really appreciate you (and others like you) who take the time to break down the processes step by step so I can understand.

      I would never have guessed that the gas layer would remain through chopsticking out a bud.

  • Preservation can be accomplished with only a mason jar, argon chargers, a “cracker,” and a balloon. Head shops sell the cracker/balloon for nitrous oxide chargers. Argon chargers themselves can be purchased on the internet.

    Wear gloves (the first step is freezing cold). Use a large, sturdy balloon. Crack the argon into the balloon. Let the contents of the balloon warm up and then slowly release the gas into the jar. One charger is enough for a small jar while $10 worth of chargers can be used for a large jar. Seal the jar and you’re done. The wine preserver I linked to eliminates the frozen hands step.

    The argon gas displaces the air and settles to the bottom. If the layer of argon is enough to cover the herb, the herb’s decay rate will be slowed to a crawl. Unlike wine, you don’t lose your gas layer when partaking. To keep the gas layer in place, store the container upright and use chopsticks to remove pieces. You should occasionally replenish the argon if you open the jar frequently.

    Argon is heavier than oxygen and carbon dioxide. If you fill a container with argon, other gases will be pushed to the top. This should not be done before the herb cures. When curing, the idea is to cycle the ethylene (“burping”). When storing, the idea is to freeze the cure in time.

    • Kushboldt,

      Thanks for describing the process. I feel so uneducated sometimes and I really appreciate you (and others like you) who take the time to break down the processes step by step so I can understand.

      I would never have guessed that the gas layer would remain through chopsticking out a bud.

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