Whose Child are You Going to Sacrifice?

According to Ryan at the North Coast Journal, “This image was sent anonymously to the Journal with the message,

these stickers are being stuck all over the county by a “grass” roots movement of concerned growers.”

Sadly, unless we do something to prepare for the probable legalization, Humboldt CO. is going to need saving.

But the fact is, sooner or later it is probably going to go legal.

And, the morality of voting to put people like us Humboldtians in jail so that Humboldt is financially stable is …well,.. pretty damn appalling.

Why don’t we just grab some random grower’s child, slap one of those bumper stickers on them, and throw their parents’ in jail while tattooing scapegoat on their skin. Because that is what would be happening—Humboldt would be sacrificing these people in order to pay land payments and buy organic food. Basically, we Humboldtians would become what we hate—snitches—turning against our own kind, in order to profit.

Real peoples’ lives are destroyed because of bad laws. The question we have to ask ourselves is ‘are we Humboldtians willing to support our relatively fine lifestyle at the cost of someone else’s child?’

A little Morality tale:

Once upon a time, there was a little boy named Jay.  He lived with his mommy and his daddy in a beautiful piece of land at the edge of the world.  Every day, Jay would follow his mommy out to the garden and help her water and feed the magic plant.  The plant grew large and green.   The plant was beautiful and made people happy but the King of the land hated the plant.  He had ordered that all who grew it should be put in jail.

Mommy and Daddy had a magic paper spell called a ballot that could stop the wicked King but Mommy and Daddy explained to little Jay that the law against having the magic plant was good.  This meant that the plant would be worth lots of money and they could pay their land off and buy Jay lots of good food. Jay was happy and so was little May, his best friend, who lived next door.  She, too, had a magic plant with her parents.  They would all be rich come fall.

One day the King came and found the magic plant growing in May’s yard.  While May stood watching, the King’s guards put May’s mommy and daddy in chains and carried them away.  May clung to Little Jay wondering what was happening.  Then the guards took May away, too.

Jay went and got his piggybank and shook out his pennies. “Mommy? Daddy? Could I have the magic ballot to stop the wicked King?”  Mommy and Daddy were scared and sorrowful but they needed to make their land payments so they shook their head.

The next day the King came for them.

————————————————————————————————————————————-

Let’s also be clear–Humboldt Growers, business owners, and neighbors of growers all profit in some way from marijuana’s illegality–if only by the goods and services of businesses supported by them.  If they vote against legalizing marijuana for financial reasons, they are also sacrificing somebody else (sick patients, young men that go to jail for cultivating a weed, the children of the young men, the mothers of the young men, and an honest respect for what could be a more just system) so that their profits remain high enough to support a their lifestyle.  If you are one of them,  ask yourself, could you grab that child away from your neighbor just so that you could make money?  Basically, you might as well align yourself with the slaveholders and the Brownshirts of history.

I am a passionate advocate for the grower.  But there are people suffering because marijuana is illegal.  Let’s stop this damn foolishness now.

Man up and vote for the right thing, even if it is the hard thing.

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103 comments

  • I agree and I thank you for speaking up and saying so. I’m positively floored by the anti-legalization movement by people in the business. There are so many people already in jail for the victimless crime of growing/selling/using a medicinal plant. People’s lives have already been ruined by unjust laws. Children have lost their parents, and so on. It’s absolutely wrong, uncivilized, and irrational. It needs to stop. Let’s legalize and let’s help each other make the transition.
    OneLoveMama

  • Kim you are irrational, you do not understand the wider politics of weed.

    You cannot blame growers for wanting laws to stay the way they are. It is not there fault people are getting arrested. Keep in mind folks getting arrested are doing so because it is not medicinal weed, the california 215 law did legalize marijuana in california under the guise of medical use. This means marijuana is legal for anyone who choses for it to be so and can take the time to talk with a doctor first. This law was writen perfectly. If we were to support one of these approaches to full legalization such as tom amanino’s bill. It would be nothing more than a huge government tax on an industry that is thriving desprite hard economic times. Seriously $800 a pound tax, Who would pay this and how would they regulate / mandate that you pay marijuana taxs that are so high? The whole concept that legalization will even occur is nothing more than propaganda that the new coalition of anti weed liberals is pushing. Its basicaly a fear tactic that they think will scare growers into jumping ship unweary of future job security. Even NORML says the chances of it legalizing in CA, is slim, Tom amininos bill expired on the floor and never gained enough support, all the other attempts to legalize it are also not doing well enough to get on the ballots yet. Also statisticaly marijuana initialtives always poll less on voting day usualy due to the other side spending money telling you to vote no. Lets not forget about the giant elephant in the room, AKA the federal government, whos officical position is that marijuana is illigal and will contine to remain so. Now back to my main argument, The reason growers want it to remain illigal is because this is the best option and the healthyest approach to supporting a local economy, Southern humboldt wouldnt be anywhere near where it is today without this grassroots aproach to making a living. Full legalization would centralize production and profits along the lines of corporations and such. Eventualy globalization would take over and all weed would be grown in mexico or india. The current model alows for 100,000’s of familys / individuals to create and own there own buisness and make enough profit to life themselves out of poverty thus helping to support there local community with the money they spend and the tax’s they pay. YES thats right growers do pay tax’s infact they pay more tax’s than non growers do! All that fuel that runs diesal operations has a tax on it that goes to fix your roads. Those properties growers buy those have property tax that is now super high because of the rise in real estate values, this tax goes to fund the schools and various other things in the state. The list goes on and on, anyone who is productive and spending money will pay the most taxs. This concept of growers sucking off the system and being on wellfare is just plain wrong. Sure there may be some dreadys in arcata who want to grow and are used to living the bum lifestyle but most growers are entrapanurials folks who are creating a living for themselves off the sweat of there own back and the knowledge of the plant.

    anyhow, humboldt grow magazine has it all wrong and there approach to journalism makes me suspricious of there true intentions, who makes a magazine called humboldt grow magazine then lives in mendocino and somehow have media connections to do all these interviews compleatly misrepusenting the community and over exposing the area in a way that makes many people unhappy. Whats with this sohum fly over article? If you ask me humboldt grow magazine is nothing more than co intel progranda, its a communist technique to create your own opposition only to mislead them into something stupid like supporting full legalization, Think of it full legalization is the only way they can kill 215 one of the last ways to make an honest buch in the hills of humboldt

    • Fiance: Did you graduate from a SoHum school? I suggest you buy a dictionary or get spell check!

      Kym makes excellent points, if you don’t agree thats ok. As far as making it legal and corporate entities taking over, most would probably want to go into the production of HEMP! It is cheaper and easier to grow and does not take the careful processing that MJ for consumption does. It has so many uses that their profit margins would be extraordinary. The seeds alone are very good for not only human consumption but farm animals as well. It is too expensive now but with legalization come lower prices. There is a plethora of uses for the hemp plant………

  • “If you are one of them, ask yourself, could you grab that child away from your neighbor just so that you could make money? Basically, you might as well align yourself with the slaveholders and the Brownshirts of history.

    I am a passionate advocate for the grower. But there are people suffering because marijuana is illegal. Let’s stop this damn foolishness now.

    Man up and vote for the right thing, even if it is the hard thing.”

    Pure scare tactics! Dont make up ridiculous circumstances and try and lay guilt on people saying that somehow they are responsible for someone else getting arested. Yes, the system is bad but legalization would only give the profits and the power to bad corporations / government regulation and would destroy the suposive “growers” you sympthesize with. Great idea kim, lets take your approach and get rid of everyones jobs just so we can feel better about the few idiots who get arrested. If we legalized like you wish, then you can say goodby to your precious hippi school up on the hill because no one would pay the ridiculous prices to live where you do. There is no transition kim, get off your high pedestool, you of all people should not be selling out like this. Were all happy you have made you share of the pie and have the luxury to just talk about weed now and not rely on it but your politics disregard everyone else around you. Whats so great about legalization what some kids will not go to jail for a couple months or get probation for smoking weed? The real question you should be asking is why are california weed laws so rediculous? why not support decriminalization and then stoners would just get fines or a slap on the wrist. Comparing folks who support the laws the current ways to brown coats or slave owners? What type of low manipulative remark is that? aprently kim you must be living in nazi slave owner land on those standards. Thanks for calling all your neighbors nazis and showing such respect for them. You really are a trailblazer in the community pushing a bunch of yuppie garbage. Thanks but no thanks your propaganda is not working and people are getting sick of it.

  • Fiance: AWESOME POST!

  • Don’t think for a minute that your “legal weed” will end oppression from armed government thugs- this is what they do. Everyday “legal” business owners are harassed and jailed by government henchmen, assets stolen. homes burned, soils salted. This is the only thing government knows and does.
    They will still hunt your stoned asses, kill your children, garnish your assets, and cause you to live in fear. Thinking a vote will save you from armed agents of offshore bankers is a joke.

    Stop the vote and shut down the non-sense!

    If another fake government election was held and nobody voted what would the slime do?

    When you vote, you agree with the system of slavery and debt service. When you vote, government thinks you are an asshole.

    • When you spend US currency you are voting for “the system”. The least you could is use your vote to change it. It is much quicker than your ranting and non-voters are numerous enough to win any election for an alternative type. Why don’t you run for something? Let’s see how many people support your ideology!

  • What a bullshit article–expected more.

  • Ted you said, “Full legalization would centralize production and profits along the lines of corporations and such.” I am also extremely worried about that. We as a county need to work to support the small grower and his/her culture. I know and you know that growers have contributed so much to this area in the form of taxes and buying power. We need to support them now (and in return, they will support Humboldt.) However, I disagree with you on several other points.

    1. “You cannot blame growers for wanting laws to stay the way they are. It is not there fault people are getting arrested” I’m not blaming all growers. I’m unhappy with those who are willing to allow sick people to struggle for their medicine, fellow growers to go to jail, and families of growers to suffer. It is the responsibility of every adult to stand up for what is right. Or for God’s sake at least not obstruct justice. I understand why we don’t want marijuana to go legal. I live here. I love people who have no other way to make land payments. If you can’t actively vote against your immediate financial interest for the greater good of society, it is certainly understandable. But, make no mistake; you are making a similar argument to that of the slaveholder and the German citizen during Nazi time who turned his head as the Jews were taken to Death Camps. No one wants to do what is uncomfortable and hard. But you also have to decide which side of history you want your children to see you standing on.

    2. Will marijuana be made legal in California this year? I agree wholeheartedly with your point that the current pro leaning polls may be different come Election Day. Ammiano’s bill has many flaws and could also not pass. But, then all the more reason to vote for legalization. Your conscience is clean and then, because prices stay high, your pockets are full. (I also want to point out that if California legalizes pot first then much of the legal pot will be flooding illegally out of California to the prohibitionist states and then California will benefit financially from our position as leader.)

    3. Humboldt Grow’s position on legalization is theirs (and I’m surprised to realize that I don’t know what it is and I will attempt to find out in the next day or two.) This is my position not necessarily theirs.

    4. I disagree that people are facing little more than slaps on the wrist for marijuana convictions. We almost all know people in jail for it. People are dead because it is illegal. Right now I know people facing long jail sentences because of it. They are scared young kids. Imagine her, she’s about 22–young and sure that her boyfriend is smart and cool. She gets in a car with him and several dozen pounds and next thing you know she’s calling a friend, her voice trembling and breaking, she’s spent her first night in jail and a month and a half later she’s still there. She’s still there because marijuana is illegal. She’s still there and we can vote to change that. We might not succeed (although, I’m pretty damn sure we will–sooner probably rather than later) but we need to try.

    Ted, I think you know I love this County. I think you can see how much I love the marijuana culture. I have lain awake at night over this issue –aware that the legalization of marijuana will harm both. I want us to prepare for the tsunami of problems that can face us with legalization (I’m writing an article for the NCJ right now about some things we can do.) But, I will not stand on the wrong side of history with this one. I will not be part of the problem when I can be part of the solution. Last night, when my son heard what I wrote, he said, “I’m proud of you, Mom.” Let’s have all our children be proud of us. Let’s tell them how, when it was financially the hard thing to do, we voted to make marijuana legal because it was the right thing to do.

  • This whole issue of growers not wanting to see pot legalized has been brewing for some time. In my observations, I’ve noticed that those who don’t want it legal have a personal agenda. Quite frankly I understand this. The fear of losing their pot money motivates those growers who use scare tactics to demonize legalization.

    Change comes hard. I’m not altogether convinced that the corporations will take over the weed industry. I know that’s one of the things being thrown around, but that doesn’t mean it will happen.

    I foresee the general public being able to grow their own pot. If that happens, many of the growers fears will disappear. If a pot consumer just grows enough for himself (inside grow) they can avoid paying for it. Sure, there will be some who do grow acres of it. I suspect there will be a mini land rush which will stimulate California’s economy.

    The bottom line: as long as legalization includes the right for the individual to grow their own, corporations will not control marijuana sales and cultivation. People will come up with new strains and there will always be a market for the little guy.
    On the other hand…if the right to grow isn’t included in the legalization process, then it’s time to worry.

  • From what I hear of the prices lately people are going to have to look for other work soon either way.

  • From what I hear of the prices lately people are going to have to look for other work soon either way.

  • Great post, Kym.

    Self-interest may be a euphemism for what we used to call Original Sin, our Inner Asshole selves. You’ve unintentionally evoked the wisdom of the great California health-nut commie Upton Sinclair, who observed almost a century ago, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

    What some locals choose not to understand is that this issue is about many, many more people than them. You as a good mother think about prohibition’s effects on local families. I as an urban transplant think of the literal millions of people less privileged than we are, who go to jail, lose their children, ruin their lives etc by the same system that lets us carry pounds of what sends them to jail for quarter-ounces. Justifying such an immoral disgrace takes a lot of, er, self-interest. Decriminalizing may slow the leaks from the price bubble, but it doesn’t change the history of bubbles.

    You’ve done good thinking about how we can adapt to the changes ahead. The idea that a handful of backwoods profiteers can reverse the winds of change isn’t just self-interested–it’s delusional. They’ve barely got bumperstickers to work with, and we all know how much good bumperstickers do.

    I’m not arguing for change. I’m arguing for reality. It’s what’s for lunch.

  • Great post, Kym.

    Self-interest may be a euphemism for what we used to call Original Sin, our Inner Asshole selves. You’ve unintentionally evoked the wisdom of the great California health-nut commie Upton Sinclair, who observed almost a century ago, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

    What some locals choose not to understand is that this issue is about many, many more people than them. You as a good mother think about prohibition’s effects on local families. I as an urban transplant think of the literal millions of people less privileged than we are, who go to jail, lose their children, ruin their lives etc by the same system that lets us carry pounds of what sends them to jail for quarter-ounces. Justifying such an immoral disgrace takes a lot of, er, self-interest. Decriminalizing may slow the leaks from the price bubble, but it doesn’t change the history of bubbles.

    You’ve done good thinking about how we can adapt to the changes ahead. The idea that a handful of backwoods profiteers can reverse the winds of change isn’t just self-interested–it’s delusional. They’ve barely got bumperstickers to work with, and we all know how much good bumperstickers do.

    I’m not arguing for change. I’m arguing for reality. It’s what’s for lunch.

  • Pingback: Potstickers « Sohum Parlance II

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  • With legalization, there are a lot of variables in play and several ways things can play out. I believe that it would be best for growers of Humboldt to prepare for it to inevitably happen, rather than fight it. It would be a good opportunity to legitimize and could benefit the area.

    I myself hate the way the government and corporations fight so hard to maintain their monopolies and continually oppress the little man. However, I think this is one area that the little man has more power over them. With the legalization only in California, big corporations/government entities will not be able to enter the market initially as it would still be illegal federally. Thus, legalization would provide a larger gray area than Prop. 215 for local small time growers who already have the knowledge and resources in place to capture such a market Also, legalization would greatly increase demand as more and more people will consume MJ without fear of unfair punishment. Prices would in fact go up regardless of any imposed taxes, and the burden of the taxes would fall on the end consumer. Which, once again they would gladly pay as a premium on not having a criminal record. Having been raided by the police and awaiting charges to be filled, I sure as hell know I would.

    Another thing to consider is that people demand good quality. Good quality which is hard to produce by large scale production. Even if large corporations were to enter into cultivation, the need for small time good old Humboldt grown product will always be there. Actually, with a legalized market, even more so than ever.

    Plan for it and work to reap the benefits of it.

  • With legalization, there are a lot of variables in play and several ways things can play out. I believe that it would be best for growers of Humboldt to prepare for it to inevitably happen, rather than fight it. It would be a good opportunity to legitimize and could benefit the area.

    I myself hate the way the government and corporations fight so hard to maintain their monopolies and continually oppress the little man. However, I think this is one area that the little man has more power over them. With the legalization only in California, big corporations/government entities will not be able to enter the market initially as it would still be illegal federally. Thus, legalization would provide a larger gray area than Prop. 215 for local small time growers who already have the knowledge and resources in place to capture such a market Also, legalization would greatly increase demand as more and more people will consume MJ without fear of unfair punishment. Prices would in fact go up regardless of any imposed taxes, and the burden of the taxes would fall on the end consumer. Which, once again they would gladly pay as a premium on not having a criminal record. Having been raided by the police and awaiting charges to be filled, I sure as hell know I would.

    Another thing to consider is that people demand good quality. Good quality which is hard to produce by large scale production. Even if large corporations were to enter into cultivation, the need for small time good old Humboldt grown product will always be there. Actually, with a legalized market, even more so than ever.

    Plan for it and work to reap the benefits of it.

  • I love the argument against legalization because it will be taxed. What most people don’t realize is that illicitly obtained income is also taxable. That’s how they nailed Al Capone.

    I’m with Kym wholeheartedly. This could open up the community, remove some of the paranoia, some of the deaths, some of the locked gates, fear of walking on the trails, save a few lives, and maybe allow us to discuss the problems in a much more open and honest manner. If we start planning for the transition, we can weather the storm.

    Changes tend to snowball. Prohibition may be nearing its end. If the measure passes, the issue will definitely be revisited at the federal level.

    Maybe we need some economic diversity around here. Organic farms. Bring back some of the orchards. Maybe some ranching. Alternative energy technology. We’d better think of something.

  • I love the argument against legalization because it will be taxed. What most people don’t realize is that illicitly obtained income is also taxable. That’s how they nailed Al Capone.

    I’m with Kym wholeheartedly. This could open up the community, remove some of the paranoia, some of the deaths, some of the locked gates, fear of walking on the trails, save a few lives, and maybe allow us to discuss the problems in a much more open and honest manner. If we start planning for the transition, we can weather the storm.

    Changes tend to snowball. Prohibition may be nearing its end. If the measure passes, the issue will definitely be revisited at the federal level.

    Maybe we need some economic diversity around here. Organic farms. Bring back some of the orchards. Maybe some ranching. Alternative energy technology. We’d better think of something.

  • Kim, legalization would almost certainly lead to corporate production and eventualy will be outsources to india, brazil, china, thailand, mexico or where ever can grow it the cheapest. Marijuana doesnt take a rocket science to grow so the idea that local knowledge matters is irrelevent, humboldt was once a trailblazer in lumber technology, not much is invented along those lines localy anymore. Also how can you say you are supporting growers by advocating for the abolishment and eventual corporate takeover / outsourcing of there jobs? What exactly to you sudgest doing to support these new growers without jobs?

    How come you claim “some growers” allow sick people to struggle for there medecine? What does this have to do with all growers in general? Also what is this claim about? are you sudgesting that growers charge too much for it and that affects medical users? This is simply not true, local humboldt medical mj clubs offer the lowest prices in the state almost 1/2 the price of L.A. Clubs, true the clubs have been ripping off medical patients for years, if your problem is with them then thats fine but truth be told growers localy only help the sick people by supplying them with wholesale prices and trim jobs etc. We must remember its a free market and prices are subject to be whatever the seller wants. If there is some sellers who are not as generous as you state that is that individuals problem not a problem of growers as a whole. Once again lets not lump in all growers as some generalization term, the term growers covers almost ever demographic in the county so its hard to say its just one person or one type of people doing this.

    Also you say “fellow growers to go to jail, and families of growers to suffer. It is the responsibility of every adult to stand up for what is right.”

    This is just a bait and hook line. If you looked at california MJ laws, you would know that for serious non medical offences the most time most people are looking at is 6-18 months in state prison or less and thats only if your growing 100’s of pounds! Federal laws is a whole other story / topic. My point being is you claim we should all stand up and be “men” and vote out of existance most the people in humboldts jobs just so a couple of kids who were growing way too big in the first place have to go to jail for a couple of months of have there assets taken by the police. Oh

    Also you said “But, make no mistake; you are making a similar argument to that of the slaveholder and the German citizen during Nazi time who turned his head as the Jews were taken to Death Camps.”

    Once again with the refferences to death camps and calling folks nazis, isnt this a little childish and nothing more than a dramatic statment? Seriously somehow a grower who likes the current laws is responsible for a couple of idiots getting busted and going to jail or getting probation for a couple of months. This is marijuana, not cocain and heroing or meth. VERY VERY FEW familys have been broken up over the marijuana issue. How can growers be compared to nazi supporters? asif these growers to get busted because of our support of current laws are going off to death camps or are going to be worked to death and then killed. Yes, kim great comparison!

    Also you said: “We almost all know people in jail for it. People are dead because it is illegal. ”

    Yes it can be sad that folks have been killed in the past over bad buisness but this cannot be blamed on marijuana being illigal, cattle ranchers used to kill each other over things as simple as someone putting up a fence! plenty of buisness deals go wrong both legal and illigal. It is sad but its not exclusivly a problem because of its illegality! As for your story about the young girl who wound up in the wrong car at the wrong time, once again, this is not the growers problem, fault or responsibility, if you dont want such tough measures for folks getting arested then go ahead and decriminalize marijuana state wide and then the young girl would of gotten a slap on the wrist and sent home.

    Also you said “I will not be part of the problem when I can be part of the solution. Last night, when my son heard what I wrote, he said, “I’m proud of you, Mom.” Let’s have all our children be proud of us. Let’s tell them how, when it was financially the hard thing to do, we voted to make marijuana legal because it was the right thing to do.”

    Kim i think you compleatly mislead on your role and what side you truely will be on in the “history books” The sentiment that will be felt against pro legalization folks in this county will be the same felt by timber works against enviormentalist coming in and destroying there jobs. Also im sure your kid is proud of you except i dont think that alone means much, i would expect anyones kid will most likely agree with them, and i doubt your kid has a full scope of knowledge on the issues, however im am happy he was proud of you. All in all i dont mean to be such a harsh critic of your writing, i really enjoy your blog and your photography in wonderfull. I know you really care about this community but i think your position is too prgresive for the current agenda in america. We are entering a DEEP DEEP depression unemployment will soon be at 20% nationwide like it was in the great depression and it is already double digits in humboldt county. Plus the roler coaster ride down is nowhere near from being finished! My point being is we have alot of tough times ahead of us and money is going to be tought and in short supply for all of us. If humboldt county is going to continue its steady rate of growth and things getting nicer and maintained then we are going to need this income from marijuana dollars. Yes in a perfect world there would be some other alternative but almost every other attempt to restart the local economy has failed, tourism alone will not the the future of the county. Perhaps we should expand the schools at HSU to provide marijuana specific horticulture degrees, it could be the first in the state and it would alow the college / the area to have a higher educated level of graduated these folks could help breed local seeds and humboldt would be where all the strain / seed banks are held. much like amsterdam is to euro seed companys. This is just a thought.

    Anyhow, i hope you will seriously consider some of the positions i am making are realize the tough choice we have to make is to keep the current laws the way they are and push for wider decriminalization of marijuana.

    Also i would like to point out that both mexican cartels / the CIA run almost all the cocain, heroin, and meth in the county aswell as pharmacutical companys make all the extasy and morphine, etc etc. Marijuana is one of the only drugs whos profits actualy support and flow back to the community. legalization would only alow bad corporations to take over and have another monopoly on drugs that would then be used to destroy our communities turning marijuana into a negative force in your community.

    • Ted,

      In the comment below, Ash points to an article that offers some solutions to the worry about the corporatization of pot (which I agree is a real worry!)

      I agree with you that average pot is easy enough to grow (though so are tomatoes and luscious heirloom tomatoes are about worth their weight in gold because people don’t grow their own, they buy them) but specialty strains have been developed by the good growers and there is a market for those specialty strains. I also agree with you that people are going to lose a good portion of their income if marijuana is legalized. (The amount of growers to consumers is obviously proportionally much less so probably eventually marijuana will be legalized and I want to prepare the county and the growers as much as possible for this eventuality.)

      1) The sick people comment was in reference to the fact that the more we move the paradigm towards legality in our state, the more likely people (sick or otherwise) will be able to get marijuana legally everywhere.

      2) In my opinion, the “only” 6 or 18 months of prison can dramatically effect people for the worse. But I am mostly talking about moving the paradigm. If California votes to legalize marijuana, it throws a huge weight behind groups seeking to legalize elsewhere–places where simply having a roach clip can result in serious fines and where possession of mere grams of pot can result in jail time.

      3) As to “death camps’, etc you are right. It is over exaggeration and simplification. I feel passionately that voting against marijuana legalization while at the same time growing marijuana is hypocrisy. Equating one form of hypocrisy to the other is a bit much though, I apologize.

      4)I disagree with you about marijuna’s illegality not leading to deaths. When it is illegal, people are forced to deal with disagreements themselves. Sometimes this leads to an escalation of violence. I’m not one of those that would say there are dead bodies hidden all over these hills but there have been marijuana related deaths.

      5) I love your idea about encouraging HSU to expand degrees in horticulture to marijuana specific degrees. (Who would rather go to Oakland to Oaksterdam, when they could come to beautiful green Humboldt State?)

      Like you I think Marijuana has been a mainly beneficial partner to the North Coast region. I just think that
      a) it is morally right to vote for marijuana to be legal.
      b) we can minimize the damage by
      i) Having California legalize ahead of the nation (our weed will almost assuredly cross borders to other states which will function as a price support.)
      ii) Helping the Emerald Triangle prepare for the coming legalization in any way we can.

      Here is an example of a small harm with repercussions that exists only because marijuana is illegal.

  • Kim, legalization would almost certainly lead to corporate production and eventualy will be outsources to india, brazil, china, thailand, mexico or where ever can grow it the cheapest. Marijuana doesnt take a rocket science to grow so the idea that local knowledge matters is irrelevent, humboldt was once a trailblazer in lumber technology, not much is invented along those lines localy anymore. Also how can you say you are supporting growers by advocating for the abolishment and eventual corporate takeover / outsourcing of there jobs? What exactly to you sudgest doing to support these new growers without jobs?

    How come you claim “some growers” allow sick people to struggle for there medecine? What does this have to do with all growers in general? Also what is this claim about? are you sudgesting that growers charge too much for it and that affects medical users? This is simply not true, local humboldt medical mj clubs offer the lowest prices in the state almost 1/2 the price of L.A. Clubs, true the clubs have been ripping off medical patients for years, if your problem is with them then thats fine but truth be told growers localy only help the sick people by supplying them with wholesale prices and trim jobs etc. We must remember its a free market and prices are subject to be whatever the seller wants. If there is some sellers who are not as generous as you state that is that individuals problem not a problem of growers as a whole. Once again lets not lump in all growers as some generalization term, the term growers covers almost ever demographic in the county so its hard to say its just one person or one type of people doing this.

    Also you say “fellow growers to go to jail, and families of growers to suffer. It is the responsibility of every adult to stand up for what is right.”

    This is just a bait and hook line. If you looked at california MJ laws, you would know that for serious non medical offences the most time most people are looking at is 6-18 months in state prison or less and thats only if your growing 100’s of pounds! Federal laws is a whole other story / topic. My point being is you claim we should all stand up and be “men” and vote out of existance most the people in humboldts jobs just so a couple of kids who were growing way too big in the first place have to go to jail for a couple of months of have there assets taken by the police. Oh

    Also you said “But, make no mistake; you are making a similar argument to that of the slaveholder and the German citizen during Nazi time who turned his head as the Jews were taken to Death Camps.”

    Once again with the refferences to death camps and calling folks nazis, isnt this a little childish and nothing more than a dramatic statment? Seriously somehow a grower who likes the current laws is responsible for a couple of idiots getting busted and going to jail or getting probation for a couple of months. This is marijuana, not cocain and heroing or meth. VERY VERY FEW familys have been broken up over the marijuana issue. How can growers be compared to nazi supporters? asif these growers to get busted because of our support of current laws are going off to death camps or are going to be worked to death and then killed. Yes, kim great comparison!

    Also you said: “We almost all know people in jail for it. People are dead because it is illegal. ”

    Yes it can be sad that folks have been killed in the past over bad buisness but this cannot be blamed on marijuana being illigal, cattle ranchers used to kill each other over things as simple as someone putting up a fence! plenty of buisness deals go wrong both legal and illigal. It is sad but its not exclusivly a problem because of its illegality! As for your story about the young girl who wound up in the wrong car at the wrong time, once again, this is not the growers problem, fault or responsibility, if you dont want such tough measures for folks getting arested then go ahead and decriminalize marijuana state wide and then the young girl would of gotten a slap on the wrist and sent home.

    Also you said “I will not be part of the problem when I can be part of the solution. Last night, when my son heard what I wrote, he said, “I’m proud of you, Mom.” Let’s have all our children be proud of us. Let’s tell them how, when it was financially the hard thing to do, we voted to make marijuana legal because it was the right thing to do.”

    Kim i think you compleatly mislead on your role and what side you truely will be on in the “history books” The sentiment that will be felt against pro legalization folks in this county will be the same felt by timber works against enviormentalist coming in and destroying there jobs. Also im sure your kid is proud of you except i dont think that alone means much, i would expect anyones kid will most likely agree with them, and i doubt your kid has a full scope of knowledge on the issues, however im am happy he was proud of you. All in all i dont mean to be such a harsh critic of your writing, i really enjoy your blog and your photography in wonderfull. I know you really care about this community but i think your position is too prgresive for the current agenda in america. We are entering a DEEP DEEP depression unemployment will soon be at 20% nationwide like it was in the great depression and it is already double digits in humboldt county. Plus the roler coaster ride down is nowhere near from being finished! My point being is we have alot of tough times ahead of us and money is going to be tought and in short supply for all of us. If humboldt county is going to continue its steady rate of growth and things getting nicer and maintained then we are going to need this income from marijuana dollars. Yes in a perfect world there would be some other alternative but almost every other attempt to restart the local economy has failed, tourism alone will not the the future of the county. Perhaps we should expand the schools at HSU to provide marijuana specific horticulture degrees, it could be the first in the state and it would alow the college / the area to have a higher educated level of graduated these folks could help breed local seeds and humboldt would be where all the strain / seed banks are held. much like amsterdam is to euro seed companys. This is just a thought.

    Anyhow, i hope you will seriously consider some of the positions i am making are realize the tough choice we have to make is to keep the current laws the way they are and push for wider decriminalization of marijuana.

    Also i would like to point out that both mexican cartels / the CIA run almost all the cocain, heroin, and meth in the county aswell as pharmacutical companys make all the extasy and morphine, etc etc. Marijuana is one of the only drugs whos profits actualy support and flow back to the community. legalization would only alow bad corporations to take over and have another monopoly on drugs that would then be used to destroy our communities turning marijuana into a negative force in your community.

    • Ted,

      In the comment below, Ash points to an article that offers some solutions to the worry about the corporatization of pot (which I agree is a real worry!)

      I agree with you that average pot is easy enough to grow (though so are tomatoes and luscious heirloom tomatoes are about worth their weight in gold because people don’t grow their own, they buy them) but specialty strains have been developed by the good growers and there is a market for those specialty strains. I also agree with you that people are going to lose a good portion of their income if marijuana is legalized. (The amount of growers to consumers is obviously proportionally much less so probably eventually marijuana will be legalized and I want to prepare the county and the growers as much as possible for this eventuality.)

      1) The sick people comment was in reference to the fact that the more we move the paradigm towards legality in our state, the more likely people (sick or otherwise) will be able to get marijuana legally everywhere.

      2) In my opinion, the “only” 6 or 18 months of prison can dramatically effect people for the worse. But I am mostly talking about moving the paradigm. If California votes to legalize marijuana, it throws a huge weight behind groups seeking to legalize elsewhere–places where simply having a roach clip can result in serious fines and where possession of mere grams of pot can result in jail time.

      3) As to “death camps’, etc you are right. It is over exaggeration and simplification. I feel passionately that voting against marijuana legalization while at the same time growing marijuana is hypocrisy. Equating one form of hypocrisy to the other is a bit much though, I apologize.

      4)I disagree with you about marijuna’s illegality not leading to deaths. When it is illegal, people are forced to deal with disagreements themselves. Sometimes this leads to an escalation of violence. I’m not one of those that would say there are dead bodies hidden all over these hills but there have been marijuana related deaths.

      5) I love your idea about encouraging HSU to expand degrees in horticulture to marijuana specific degrees. (Who would rather go to Oakland to Oaksterdam, when they could come to beautiful green Humboldt State?)

      Like you I think Marijuana has been a mainly beneficial partner to the North Coast region. I just think that
      a) it is morally right to vote for marijuana to be legal.
      b) we can minimize the damage by
      i) Having California legalize ahead of the nation (our weed will almost assuredly cross borders to other states which will function as a price support.)
      ii) Helping the Emerald Triangle prepare for the coming legalization in any way we can.

      Here is an example of a small harm with repercussions that exists only because marijuana is illegal.

  • You must be so stoned to not see the blinders you wear with government. You want stoners to not fear government and ask which humdum will be tossed under the bus next for weed.

    Yet, you don’t seem to think about anyone else and how government might hunt and steal from them=

    pretty simple minded.

    There is a world beyond weed- put down the pipe, and stop drinking Sohum well water- it’s tainted.

  • You must be so stoned to not see the blinders you wear with government. You want stoners to not fear government and ask which humdum will be tossed under the bus next for weed.

    Yet, you don’t seem to think about anyone else and how government might hunt and steal from them=

    pretty simple minded.

    There is a world beyond weed- put down the pipe, and stop drinking Sohum well water- it’s tainted.

    • Ash, that is an excellent article. I read it yesterday and think all growers and local lawmakers should look at it, too. The idea of protecting the grower with some of the same legislation as Ohio and Pennsylvania have in place to protect the small farmer sounds very workable for Humboldt County.

      • Thanks Kym.

        I was most intrigued by the part about strict corporation guidelines and the part about mandating that all members of a corporation must live in the same county. This could work to a great benefit in Humboldt County, small time growers can band together to be a larger player in the market.

    • Ash, that is an excellent article. I read it yesterday and think all growers and local lawmakers should look at it, too. The idea of protecting the grower with some of the same legislation as Ohio and Pennsylvania have in place to protect the small farmer sounds very workable for Humboldt County.

      • Thanks Kym.

        I was most intrigued by the part about strict corporation guidelines and the part about mandating that all members of a corporation must live in the same county. This could work to a great benefit in Humboldt County, small time growers can band together to be a larger player in the market.

  • WOW. What a hot topic.

    Kym I think your argument is congruent. Whether one votes to legalize weed or not, should not be motivated by money, but by consideration of the facts. Government has problems, but ‘we’ are the solution, not some selfish idea that we should cheat the government because it cheats us. This idea really pisses me off sometimes. People I know getting government money for health care because their taxes show no income. The health care they receive is being paid by folks who pay their taxes and keep the system going, same thing about the roads etc., etc, etc. It is not right to be parasitic.

    • Fiance: I have to agree with TJ. We are now paying excessive child support because the ex got on welfare, she was receiving Medi-Cal, Welfare to Work and AFDC, all things she herself told me she didn’t need. That is pretty much what makes me the angriest. DCSS refused to acknowledge that we had the child on HK’s health care insurance for almost two years because she was on Medi-Cal and “he might lose it.” We pay the taxes that provide that money for Medi-Cal, as well as the taxes that fund DCSS so in effect we feel like we are paying double for everything. She only calims an income of $670 a month for tax and child support purposes! Gimme a break, she is now paying $675 an hour for two family law attorneys yet the court still accepts her deflated income because they get more money out of the deal. DCSS refuses to look closer into her income because then they would have to admit that they let her commit welfare fraud for three years.

  • WOW. What a hot topic.

    Kym I think your argument is congruent. Whether one votes to legalize weed or not, should not be motivated by money, but by consideration of the facts. Government has problems, but ‘we’ are the solution, not some selfish idea that we should cheat the government because it cheats us. This idea really pisses me off sometimes. People I know getting government money for health care because their taxes show no income. The health care they receive is being paid by folks who pay their taxes and keep the system going, same thing about the roads etc., etc, etc. It is not right to be parasitic.

    • Fiance: I have to agree with TJ. We are now paying excessive child support because the ex got on welfare, she was receiving Medi-Cal, Welfare to Work and AFDC, all things she herself told me she didn’t need. That is pretty much what makes me the angriest. DCSS refused to acknowledge that we had the child on HK’s health care insurance for almost two years because she was on Medi-Cal and “he might lose it.” We pay the taxes that provide that money for Medi-Cal, as well as the taxes that fund DCSS so in effect we feel like we are paying double for everything. She only calims an income of $670 a month for tax and child support purposes! Gimme a break, she is now paying $675 an hour for two family law attorneys yet the court still accepts her deflated income because they get more money out of the deal. DCSS refuses to look closer into her income because then they would have to admit that they let her commit welfare fraud for three years.

  • Kim, legalization would almost certainly lead to corporate production and eventualy will be outsources to india, brazil, china, thailand, mexico or where ever can grow it the cheapest.

    Gosh, maybe we should make everything illegal including avocados and pinto beans. Hell, maybe even officially ban newspapers, toasters, and greeting cards. Then nothing would be outsourced.

  • Kim, legalization would almost certainly lead to corporate production and eventualy will be outsources to india, brazil, china, thailand, mexico or where ever can grow it the cheapest.

    Gosh, maybe we should make everything illegal including avocados and pinto beans. Hell, maybe even officially ban newspapers, toasters, and greeting cards. Then nothing would be outsourced.

  • The sentiment that will be felt against pro legalization folks in this county will be the same felt by timber works against enviormentalist coming in and destroying there jobs.

    Yup.

  • The sentiment that will be felt against pro legalization folks in this county will be the same felt by timber works against enviormentalist coming in and destroying there jobs.

    Yup.

  • As a side note… corporate america/ big business is currently doing their best to raise and fatten cattle on subsidized feed. They have all the advantages that they would bring to bear in producing MJ for the legal market. And yet Local, sustainably raised and harvested and humboldt grass fed cattle STILL provide the income we need on our little ranch. Our fellow citizens are due some credit… we all want and care about quality in our lives and what we buy. We will survive! And thrive! mark

    • Fiance: Speaking of the beef you raise, where could I get some if I happen to be wondering the streets of Humboldt? Can you ship it to other states?

  • As a side note… corporate america/ big business is currently doing their best to raise and fatten cattle on subsidized feed. They have all the advantages that they would bring to bear in producing MJ for the legal market. And yet Local, sustainably raised and harvested and humboldt grass fed cattle STILL provide the income we need on our little ranch. Our fellow citizens are due some credit… we all want and care about quality in our lives and what we buy. We will survive! And thrive! mark

    • Fiance: Speaking of the beef you raise, where could I get some if I happen to be wondering the streets of Humboldt? Can you ship it to other states?

  • The question here is not whether people will still buy “Humboldt” after legalization. Maybe they will, maybe they won’t. one of the many variables that no one seems to take into account is that we no longer have a corner on the genetics that we had 20 years ago. Take, for example, Colorado’s recent surge in medical marijuana production. If they keep going, Denver is going to be the Humboldt of the central U.S. So it’s not a matter of if people will still recognize “Humboldt” but rather what happens when we have to compete on the open market with Colorado Chronic or Mariposa Meltdown. As an example I’ll offer a highly subjective personal anecdote. When I was a kid, we drank a lot of European beer because it was so much better than anything produced in the U.S. Now, I can’t remember the last time I drank a Euro-beer because the advent of more localized microbrews won my allegiance years ago. Hell, I don’t even drink Sierra Nevada anymore and it’s only brewed 5 hours away.

    The gourmet niche, such as the free range beef comment, is possibly one viable option. But don’t count too much on that option, as it pays to remember that alcohol is deeply entrenched in our society on a level that marijuana can only dream of. Also, remember that vineyards are expensive to buy, own, and operate and not everybody could leap into that business when Napa took off in the 70s. I’ve actually reconsidered whether we can Napa-ize our local economy because a subsequent investigation of the topic revealed something that I think we’re all missing: there are few successful small, family enterprises existing in the Napa wine economy. Either they sold out to larger firms because they couldn’t compete or the went the way of Mondavi and became multinationals. I cringe a little bit when I try to imagine my neighbors trying to run a business venture of this scale; they can’t even synchronize the timers for their lights together.

    What would be especially funny would be to see the local “liberal” growers reaction to organization of their labor forces, something that wineries in Napa deal with on a daily basis. Can you imagine if the trimmers formed a local union? “Nothing gets trimmed until we get $40 an hour, two breaks a day, and paid holidays.” Ha!

    • Trimmers will be worse off. No $40 union will survive when growers needn’t know and trust their employees, who are competing against a vast pool of poor workers with no real job skills.

  • The question here is not whether people will still buy “Humboldt” after legalization. Maybe they will, maybe they won’t. one of the many variables that no one seems to take into account is that we no longer have a corner on the genetics that we had 20 years ago. Take, for example, Colorado’s recent surge in medical marijuana production. If they keep going, Denver is going to be the Humboldt of the central U.S. So it’s not a matter of if people will still recognize “Humboldt” but rather what happens when we have to compete on the open market with Colorado Chronic or Mariposa Meltdown. As an example I’ll offer a highly subjective personal anecdote. When I was a kid, we drank a lot of European beer because it was so much better than anything produced in the U.S. Now, I can’t remember the last time I drank a Euro-beer because the advent of more localized microbrews won my allegiance years ago. Hell, I don’t even drink Sierra Nevada anymore and it’s only brewed 5 hours away.

    The gourmet niche, such as the free range beef comment, is possibly one viable option. But don’t count too much on that option, as it pays to remember that alcohol is deeply entrenched in our society on a level that marijuana can only dream of. Also, remember that vineyards are expensive to buy, own, and operate and not everybody could leap into that business when Napa took off in the 70s. I’ve actually reconsidered whether we can Napa-ize our local economy because a subsequent investigation of the topic revealed something that I think we’re all missing: there are few successful small, family enterprises existing in the Napa wine economy. Either they sold out to larger firms because they couldn’t compete or the went the way of Mondavi and became multinationals. I cringe a little bit when I try to imagine my neighbors trying to run a business venture of this scale; they can’t even synchronize the timers for their lights together.

    What would be especially funny would be to see the local “liberal” growers reaction to organization of their labor forces, something that wineries in Napa deal with on a daily basis. Can you imagine if the trimmers formed a local union? “Nothing gets trimmed until we get $40 an hour, two breaks a day, and paid holidays.” Ha!

    • Trimmers will be worse off. No $40 union will survive when growers needn’t know and trust their employees, who are competing against a vast pool of poor workers with no real job skills.

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  • Self-interest may be a euphemism for what we used to call Original Sin,

    LOL!!! sounds like some ppl believe that soHum sold its soul to the devil like Pat Robertson told us Haiti did.

    trimming my fig leaf,
    s

  • Self-interest may be a euphemism for what we used to call Original Sin,

    LOL!!! sounds like some ppl believe that soHum sold its soul to the devil like Pat Robertson told us Haiti did.

    trimming my fig leaf,
    s

  • I agree with you Kym, and Randy, I think you raise a good point mentioning the gourmet niche. Sure, beer and wine were illegal for a while, and yes, we have miller, bud, coors, but we also have four local Humboldt breweries and more local wineries providing high quality products. Cypress Grove? Humboldt can produce quality products that are in demand nationwide and can compete with the big guys. Why can’t we do the same with pot (at least in California) once it is re-legalized (remember, it was legal).

  • I agree with you Kym, and Randy, I think you raise a good point mentioning the gourmet niche. Sure, beer and wine were illegal for a while, and yes, we have miller, bud, coors, but we also have four local Humboldt breweries and more local wineries providing high quality products. Cypress Grove? Humboldt can produce quality products that are in demand nationwide and can compete with the big guys. Why can’t we do the same with pot (at least in California) once it is re-legalized (remember, it was legal).

  • Great job speaking out, Kym. llegitimi non carborundum, as my father is fond of saying.

  • Great job speaking out, Kym. llegitimi non carborundum, as my father is fond of saying.

  • Oh, and by the way, you are not “irrational” at all…

  • Capitalism is capitalism. The advent of 215 dispensaries stimulated the pot market and kept the price up. Now, dispensaries are setting up proto-legal warehouse grows using commercial electricity rates and sophisticated systems. Already this tactic has dramatically reduced the demand for indoor regardless of the variety or quality. They are growing it cheaper and making a far greater profit without fear of law enforcement. The business to be in now is the dispensary business…. Or we could sell used generators to Haiti.
    Actually indoor production has a very high profit margin still and the growers will have to lower prices dramatically to compete. The tendency at that time will be to produce more and drive the price further down. The days of dispensary demand are ending. Outdoor has the real profit margin yet the same supply and demand conditions apply. In a few years outdoor may be selling for less than $1000 a pound and trimming machines will be the norm for the profit strapped grower.

  • Capitalism is capitalism. The advent of 215 dispensaries stimulated the pot market and kept the price up. Now, dispensaries are setting up proto-legal warehouse grows using commercial electricity rates and sophisticated systems. Already this tactic has dramatically reduced the demand for indoor regardless of the variety or quality. They are growing it cheaper and making a far greater profit without fear of law enforcement. The business to be in now is the dispensary business…. Or we could sell used generators to Haiti.
    Actually indoor production has a very high profit margin still and the growers will have to lower prices dramatically to compete. The tendency at that time will be to produce more and drive the price further down. The days of dispensary demand are ending. Outdoor has the real profit margin yet the same supply and demand conditions apply. In a few years outdoor may be selling for less than $1000 a pound and trimming machines will be the norm for the profit strapped grower.

  • Amazing post kym, I’m surprised this didn’t come up a year ago. I saw earlier in the post that there were some questions as to the stance of Humboldt Grow Magazine on the legalization of marijuana, so here it goes!

    A quick history of Humboldt Grow:

    My name is Eric Sligh. I was raised in Willits and Ukiah. My mother was an English teacher and the head librarian at Mendocino College. I basically grew up in Libraries. My entire childhood was spent roaming the stacks of books at the various libraries my mother worked at. Spending so much time in a library made me truly appreciate something: Freedom of Speech: the freedom to express one’s self and their unique human experience. This is going to sound naive, but up until I started this magazine, I never imagined that someone would would actually have the guts to tell me to stop publishing factual information. Humboldt Grow Magazine doesn’t have a stance on Legalization. The goal of the magazine is to have a coherent discussion on the issue of marijuana, whether its diesel spills in the mountains or a 420 celebration at Redwood Park.

    If you advocate that people should give up the right to express themselves and stop talking about the marijuana industry so that people can keep making a buck… you need to spend some time at a library. The freedom to speak about an issue that affects our community is vital. The freedom to do so is far more important than any single issue at any point in time.

    If you want a few answers to some of the other questions from previous posts, by all means keep reading. Otherwise, I said what I had to say.

    Humboldt Grow Magazine was created in an appartment at the woodridge appartment complex, formerly known as “the greens”, in Arcata, California in 2007. For this reason the magazine is called Humboldt Grow Magazine. I was living in Arcata for several years while completing my undergrad at HSU. I, Eric Sligh, the publisher of Grow, am from Willits and Ukiah. This is why I lived in Mendocino county during the taping of “Marijuana Inc.”

    I started Humboldt Grow Magazine as a celebration of the marijuana industry in Northern California. I, like most people who read this blog, was raised in a culture where marijuana was part of our everyday lives: socially, politically and economically.

    Our first couple of issues were really basic and didn’t contain much more than a few general articles about growing organically. I came across Kym and a few others not long after I had printed the first two issues and realized that people were talking about marijuana issues in creative and coherent ways.

    When I recieved a call from CNBC about a “10 minute piece” on the marijuana industry in Mendocino, I agreed to get involved. They interviewed me for three days. We spoke about about every topic imaginable. I thought the “10 minute piece” was going to be great, shedding light on the myths about our region and giving Mendocino a human face.

    Well, what appeared on T.V. screens in early February 2008 was not a 10 minute piece, it was an hour long documentary. I agree that Marijuana Inc. came out pretty shitty and definitely perpetuated stereotypes about our region that we could do without. What could I do? Nothing. They told the story from an outsiders perspective, so we all thought it sucked.

    Marijuana inc. made me realize that our story will always be told from an outsiders perspective unless we create our own narrative. I will continue to publish Grow to do just that.

    • Eric, you should do more writing–you said this so clearly.
      For years, the marijuana story has been told from an outsider’s perspective and we in the Emerald Triangle need to speak up and own our story! (as varied and nuanced as that can be ;>)

  • Amazing post kym, I’m surprised this didn’t come up a year ago. I saw earlier in the post that there were some questions as to the stance of Humboldt Grow Magazine on the legalization of marijuana, so here it goes!

    A quick history of Humboldt Grow:

    My name is Eric Sligh. I was raised in Willits and Ukiah. My mother was an English teacher and the head librarian at Mendocino College. I basically grew up in Libraries. My entire childhood was spent roaming the stacks of books at the various libraries my mother worked at. Spending so much time in a library made me truly appreciate something: Freedom of Speech: the freedom to express one’s self and their unique human experience. This is going to sound naive, but up until I started this magazine, I never imagined that someone would would actually have the guts to tell me to stop publishing factual information. Humboldt Grow Magazine doesn’t have a stance on Legalization. The goal of the magazine is to have a coherent discussion on the issue of marijuana, whether its diesel spills in the mountains or a 420 celebration at Redwood Park.

    If you advocate that people should give up the right to express themselves and stop talking about the marijuana industry so that people can keep making a buck… you need to spend some time at a library. The freedom to speak about an issue that affects our community is vital. The freedom to do so is far more important than any single issue at any point in time.

    If you want a few answers to some of the other questions from previous posts, by all means keep reading. Otherwise, I said what I had to say.

    Humboldt Grow Magazine was created in an appartment at the woodridge appartment complex, formerly known as “the greens”, in Arcata, California in 2007. For this reason the magazine is called Humboldt Grow Magazine. I was living in Arcata for several years while completing my undergrad at HSU. I, Eric Sligh, the publisher of Grow, am from Willits and Ukiah. This is why I lived in Mendocino county during the taping of “Marijuana Inc.”

    I started Humboldt Grow Magazine as a celebration of the marijuana industry in Northern California. I, like most people who read this blog, was raised in a culture where marijuana was part of our everyday lives: socially, politically and economically.

    Our first couple of issues were really basic and didn’t contain much more than a few general articles about growing organically. I came across Kym and a few others not long after I had printed the first two issues and realized that people were talking about marijuana issues in creative and coherent ways.

    When I recieved a call from CNBC about a “10 minute piece” on the marijuana industry in Mendocino, I agreed to get involved. They interviewed me for three days. We spoke about about every topic imaginable. I thought the “10 minute piece” was going to be great, shedding light on the myths about our region and giving Mendocino a human face.

    Well, what appeared on T.V. screens in early February 2008 was not a 10 minute piece, it was an hour long documentary. I agree that Marijuana Inc. came out pretty shitty and definitely perpetuated stereotypes about our region that we could do without. What could I do? Nothing. They told the story from an outsiders perspective, so we all thought it sucked.

    Marijuana inc. made me realize that our story will always be told from an outsiders perspective unless we create our own narrative. I will continue to publish Grow to do just that.

    • Eric, you should do more writing–you said this so clearly.
      For years, the marijuana story has been told from an outsider’s perspective and we in the Emerald Triangle need to speak up and own our story! (as varied and nuanced as that can be ;>)

  • “…our story will always be told from an outsiders perspective unless we create our own narrative. I will continue to publish Grow to do just that.”

    Accurate and perceptive, thank you very much, Eric. And thanks, Kym, for the discussion.

    Ted, Decriminalization is not an answer to the issues of non-medical cannabis. Decriminalization measures already in place in various jurisdictions permit individual possession and use. They do not decriminalize non-medical cultivation, transport, or sale of cannabis. Not overlooking, of course, that where there is no local decriminalization, someone who likes to get baked on Saturday night risks jail time. Adults over the age of 21 go to jail for smoking weed. Tens of thousands of them. In 2007, per CalNORML, there were 74,119 arrests for marijuana in California, the vast majority for non-violent offenses. Isn’t that reason enough to legalize it?

    People lose jobs, they face crippling legal expenses that can bankrupt them. My god, how can you be so callow as to dismiss it as “some kid getting probation”? Talk to CalNORML, or look at their website.

    This state cannot afford to keep prosecuting these drug wars. No amount of growers paying property taxes can compensate for the starvation budget the state has put our schools one while they continue to bloat the prisons.

    No one should go to jail for weed unless they’re spilling diesel.

    At first I thought the comparison of anti-legalization growers to German citizens not speaking up against the Nazis a bit over the top, but as I thought about it, I agree. They are afraid, and people who are afraid don’t care about the ethics of a situation.

    Or maybe they are simply selfish and self absorbed, like shopaholics or fashionistas who buy a $90 pair of jeans without thinking about the fact that it cost only $5 to manufacture using slave labor in a foreign country. The evil is invisible to them. They think they are doing something good, or making themselves look good when they buy them. Their evil is banal, as Hannah Arendt said of Eichmann.

    Legalization is coming, just as the the end of timber was coming all those years. Adapt. It will take some brains and come creativity to adapt, but it won’t be insurmountable change.

    I don’t know if it will happen this November. If it were an election like ’08 with lots of young and progressive voters it would be more likely. Like the legalization of gay marriage, it may take a few rounds on the ballot or in the legislature. But it will happen after a few rounds, because the efforts to educate people of the benefits of legalization through each attempt will have a cumulative benefit.

  • “…our story will always be told from an outsiders perspective unless we create our own narrative. I will continue to publish Grow to do just that.”

    Accurate and perceptive, thank you very much, Eric. And thanks, Kym, for the discussion.

    Ted, Decriminalization is not an answer to the issues of non-medical cannabis. Decriminalization measures already in place in various jurisdictions permit individual possession and use. They do not decriminalize non-medical cultivation, transport, or sale of cannabis. Not overlooking, of course, that where there is no local decriminalization, someone who likes to get baked on Saturday night risks jail time. Adults over the age of 21 go to jail for smoking weed. Tens of thousands of them. In 2007, per CalNORML, there were 74,119 arrests for marijuana in California, the vast majority for non-violent offenses. Isn’t that reason enough to legalize it?

    People lose jobs, they face crippling legal expenses that can bankrupt them. My god, how can you be so callow as to dismiss it as “some kid getting probation”? Talk to CalNORML, or look at their website.

    This state cannot afford to keep prosecuting these drug wars. No amount of growers paying property taxes can compensate for the starvation budget the state has put our schools one while they continue to bloat the prisons.

    No one should go to jail for weed unless they’re spilling diesel.

    At first I thought the comparison of anti-legalization growers to German citizens not speaking up against the Nazis a bit over the top, but as I thought about it, I agree. They are afraid, and people who are afraid don’t care about the ethics of a situation.

    Or maybe they are simply selfish and self absorbed, like shopaholics or fashionistas who buy a $90 pair of jeans without thinking about the fact that it cost only $5 to manufacture using slave labor in a foreign country. The evil is invisible to them. They think they are doing something good, or making themselves look good when they buy them. Their evil is banal, as Hannah Arendt said of Eichmann.

    Legalization is coming, just as the the end of timber was coming all those years. Adapt. It will take some brains and come creativity to adapt, but it won’t be insurmountable change.

    I don’t know if it will happen this November. If it were an election like ’08 with lots of young and progressive voters it would be more likely. Like the legalization of gay marriage, it may take a few rounds on the ballot or in the legislature. But it will happen after a few rounds, because the efforts to educate people of the benefits of legalization through each attempt will have a cumulative benefit.

  • I forgot to mention, I have one serious serious reservation about the wording of the Tax Cannabis 2010 initiative. It makes it illegal to smoke in the presence of a minor. If a 21-year-old passes a joint to a 20 year old, could he get busted? Or, if a parent smokes after putting his kid to bed, is he in violation of the law? I think this is unmanageable legally, and an opening to all manner of unintended consequences.

  • I forgot to mention, I have one serious serious reservation about the wording of the Tax Cannabis 2010 initiative. It makes it illegal to smoke in the presence of a minor. If a 21-year-old passes a joint to a 20 year old, could he get busted? Or, if a parent smokes after putting his kid to bed, is he in violation of the law? I think this is unmanageable legally, and an opening to all manner of unintended consequences.

  • Eric Sligh, how can we trust your organization? It seems like you only named it humboldt grow because you wanted to play off of the humboldt brand. Your Sohum fly over article made many people suspect you are working for the police / camp. When and how did you have the money to rent a helicopter? and do you still consider it freedom of speech when you are exposing peoples private gardens for your own profit? Perhaps you should rename it simply “grow magazine” or something that is less exclusive to the area. Cannabis Culture used to be called Cannabis Canada untill they outgrew the name and became Cannabis Culture. Anyhow that is just an idea, back to my main point. How do we know you are not working for feds to co-opt the growers movement in humboldt county. Picture this, fed and dea have no love in this area and anti marijuana talk doesnt get much respect. so the feds hire some young folks to co-opt the movement via there propaganda peices in the “grow magazine”. The feds have tons of money they have been using to pay blogers to post articles that they want. Its basicaly an old communist technique to manufacture your own opposition, first you infect there movement with divisions and then growers are not just growers its outdoor vs indoor big vs litte grows, commercial vs hobby, diesal vs pg&e, etc etc. This infighting is destroying the movement in humboldt county and this new brand on neo-liberalism is turning liberals against marijuana in the name of getting rid of “profit” or “progress” in the community. Now i dont have enough proof at this time to tie all the ends on this conspiracy and perhaps i am just suspicious of your journalism. But do realize that what you are saying via the name “humboldt grow magazine” reflects on all the people who actualy live in humboldt county not just the ones who went to school here. Having an activism based marijuana magazine doesnt always support the community, its fine if you want to have your freedom of speech, i dont think anyone would be against that. What i am worried about is all the negative publicity that we are not reciving because you wanted to have a marijuana magazine that explited the local culture in a negative way for your own profit. Meanwhile marijuana in humboldt continues downhill and your magazine only stands to profit on the uptern in legalization. Perhaps it is the legal marijuana industry “magazines, grow colleged, clubs etc” against he illigal marijuana industry “dealers growers”. Once legalized your clubs, magazines and other related legal industries will all trive while the illigal ones will all fail. perhaps this is what you want so that you and your fed buddies can collect more taxs for offshore bankers!

    Have a nice day, and please consider chaning the name of your magazine to grow magazine.

    • Josh,

      Actually, I’m a little confused by your comment. Are you arguing that the feds are trying to co-opt the magazine in order to get the grower movement divided so that marijuana will get legalized? Wouldn’t the Feds be able to do that without any help from me? Actually, I guess I’m a lot confused. I’ll stick with what I understand and respond to those concerns.

      The last few issues have had the word Grow really large on the cover and Humboldt Grow.com just listed as the website.

      If the feds have tons of money
      a) I wouldn’t take it to write something I didn’t believe and
      b) nobody has offered me any money to write my blogs.
      Eric gives me money to write for Grow but basically gives me free rein to write about what I feel are crucial issues in the cannabis culture. As for my blog, I write whatever moves me (and frankly it isn’t influential enough for the feds or anybody else to pay me to write one way or the other.Heck, half the time, I’m surprised to find anybody reading it at all.)

      I write about divisions within the culture because they exist. They don’t exist because I write about them. I try to write about issues in the culture because ignoring faults and praising the good gets pretty damn boring even for someone like me who finds the whole kaboodle pretty damn interesting. Besides that is what a journalist is supposed to do–bring up issues and address them. If we ignore the elephant in our living room, it will still be there tomorrow. If we discuss it, maybe we can find ways use its manure for fertilizer.

      I’m not sure whether legalization will help or hurt the magazine. I’ve debated that to myself but in the end it wouldn’t matter, I think morally it should be legal so that is what I write.

      Finally, I would say that marijuana in Humboldt is in fact, getting better all the time. I’m impressed by what I see as people invite me into their lives. The buds are beautiful. I hear they are kickass. And I’m proud to be a small part of this wonderful wild culture in this lovely county we call home.

  • Eric Sligh, how can we trust your organization? It seems like you only named it humboldt grow because you wanted to play off of the humboldt brand. Your Sohum fly over article made many people suspect you are working for the police / camp. When and how did you have the money to rent a helicopter? and do you still consider it freedom of speech when you are exposing peoples private gardens for your own profit? Perhaps you should rename it simply “grow magazine” or something that is less exclusive to the area. Cannabis Culture used to be called Cannabis Canada untill they outgrew the name and became Cannabis Culture. Anyhow that is just an idea, back to my main point. How do we know you are not working for feds to co-opt the growers movement in humboldt county. Picture this, fed and dea have no love in this area and anti marijuana talk doesnt get much respect. so the feds hire some young folks to co-opt the movement via there propaganda peices in the “grow magazine”. The feds have tons of money they have been using to pay blogers to post articles that they want. Its basicaly an old communist technique to manufacture your own opposition, first you infect there movement with divisions and then growers are not just growers its outdoor vs indoor big vs litte grows, commercial vs hobby, diesal vs pg&e, etc etc. This infighting is destroying the movement in humboldt county and this new brand on neo-liberalism is turning liberals against marijuana in the name of getting rid of “profit” or “progress” in the community. Now i dont have enough proof at this time to tie all the ends on this conspiracy and perhaps i am just suspicious of your journalism. But do realize that what you are saying via the name “humboldt grow magazine” reflects on all the people who actualy live in humboldt county not just the ones who went to school here. Having an activism based marijuana magazine doesnt always support the community, its fine if you want to have your freedom of speech, i dont think anyone would be against that. What i am worried about is all the negative publicity that we are not reciving because you wanted to have a marijuana magazine that explited the local culture in a negative way for your own profit. Meanwhile marijuana in humboldt continues downhill and your magazine only stands to profit on the uptern in legalization. Perhaps it is the legal marijuana industry “magazines, grow colleged, clubs etc” against he illigal marijuana industry “dealers growers”. Once legalized your clubs, magazines and other related legal industries will all trive while the illigal ones will all fail. perhaps this is what you want so that you and your fed buddies can collect more taxs for offshore bankers!

    Have a nice day, and please consider chaning the name of your magazine to grow magazine.

    • Josh,

      Actually, I’m a little confused by your comment. Are you arguing that the feds are trying to co-opt the magazine in order to get the grower movement divided so that marijuana will get legalized? Wouldn’t the Feds be able to do that without any help from me? Actually, I guess I’m a lot confused. I’ll stick with what I understand and respond to those concerns.

      The last few issues have had the word Grow really large on the cover and Humboldt Grow.com just listed as the website.

      If the feds have tons of money
      a) I wouldn’t take it to write something I didn’t believe and
      b) nobody has offered me any money to write my blogs.
      Eric gives me money to write for Grow but basically gives me free rein to write about what I feel are crucial issues in the cannabis culture. As for my blog, I write whatever moves me (and frankly it isn’t influential enough for the feds or anybody else to pay me to write one way or the other.Heck, half the time, I’m surprised to find anybody reading it at all.)

      I write about divisions within the culture because they exist. They don’t exist because I write about them. I try to write about issues in the culture because ignoring faults and praising the good gets pretty damn boring even for someone like me who finds the whole kaboodle pretty damn interesting. Besides that is what a journalist is supposed to do–bring up issues and address them. If we ignore the elephant in our living room, it will still be there tomorrow. If we discuss it, maybe we can find ways use its manure for fertilizer.

      I’m not sure whether legalization will help or hurt the magazine. I’ve debated that to myself but in the end it wouldn’t matter, I think morally it should be legal so that is what I write.

      Finally, I would say that marijuana in Humboldt is in fact, getting better all the time. I’m impressed by what I see as people invite me into their lives. The buds are beautiful. I hear they are kickass. And I’m proud to be a small part of this wonderful wild culture in this lovely county we call home.

  • Hey Kym, I know this is off topic, but I don’t know where to post unrelated questions…
    What do you think about High Times new mmj magazine and mmj cup in san fran this summer?

    • Morgan, I’m excited about the medical marijuana magazine (One of the major producers and I are Facebook friends). I’m looking forward to seeing it. I actually hadn’t heard about the cup and would love to be pointed to more info.

  • Hey Kym, I know this is off topic, but I don’t know where to post unrelated questions…
    What do you think about High Times new mmj magazine and mmj cup in san fran this summer?

    • Morgan, I’m excited about the medical marijuana magazine (One of the major producers and I are Facebook friends). I’m looking forward to seeing it. I actually hadn’t heard about the cup and would love to be pointed to more info.

  • me don’t understand why y’all fighting so much over the healing of the nation. The herb is a sign of peace. Jah, Rasta Fari! Ever lasting ever knowing. The herb is a plant. You smoke herb it make you meditate.

    legal, illegal – make no difference to I and I. Have faith in Jah, Rasta Fari, Conquering Lion of Judah, King of Kings, Tribe of Judah, King Solomon’s line – Haile Selasse I

    Until the philosophy which hold one race
    Superior and another inferior
    Is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned
    Everywhere is war, me say war

    That until there are no longer first class
    And second class citizens of any nation
    Until the colour of a man’s skin
    Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes
    Me say war

    That until the basic human rights are equally
    Guaranteed to all, without regard to race
    Dis a war

    That until that day
    The dream of lasting peace, world citizenship
    Rule of international morality
    Will remain in but a fleeting illusion
    To be persued, but never attained
    Now everywhere is war, war

    And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes
    that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique,
    South Africa sub-human bondage
    Have been toppled, utterly destroyed
    Well, everywhere is war, me say war

    War in the east, war in the west
    War up north, war down south
    War, war, rumours of war

    And until that day, the African continent
    Will not know peace, we Africans will fight
    We find it necessary and we know we shall win
    As we are confident in the victory

    Of good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
    Good over evil, good over evil, good over evil

    oops – that damn Rasta font took over again.

  • me don’t understand why y’all fighting so much over the healing of the nation. The herb is a sign of peace. Jah, Rasta Fari! Ever lasting ever knowing. The herb is a plant. You smoke herb it make you meditate.

    legal, illegal – make no difference to I and I. Have faith in Jah, Rasta Fari, Conquering Lion of Judah, King of Kings, Tribe of Judah, King Solomon’s line – Haile Selasse I

    Until the philosophy which hold one race
    Superior and another inferior
    Is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned
    Everywhere is war, me say war

    That until there are no longer first class
    And second class citizens of any nation
    Until the colour of a man’s skin
    Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes
    Me say war

    That until the basic human rights are equally
    Guaranteed to all, without regard to race
    Dis a war

    That until that day
    The dream of lasting peace, world citizenship
    Rule of international morality
    Will remain in but a fleeting illusion
    To be persued, but never attained
    Now everywhere is war, war

    And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes
    that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique,
    South Africa sub-human bondage
    Have been toppled, utterly destroyed
    Well, everywhere is war, me say war

    War in the east, war in the west
    War up north, war down south
    War, war, rumours of war

    And until that day, the African continent
    Will not know peace, we Africans will fight
    We find it necessary and we know we shall win
    As we are confident in the victory

    Of good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
    Good over evil, good over evil, good over evil

    oops – that damn Rasta font took over again.

  • OK, OK, Lets do this!
    Couple things:
    Ammiano’s Bill is dead.
    The next thing coming up is a Tax and Regulate Ballot initiative in November. Nevada is also voting on a Tax and Regulate initiative this year.
    The California Initiative would legalize production (state wide) up to 25 square feet. !!
    That doesn’t do much.
    IT ALSO ALLOWS LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO CHANGE THE LIMITS.
    THIS is where we should be looking for our way to benefit Humboldt County.
    Higher Limits that allow for a profitable LEGAL grow BUT Low enough limits to keep the industry away from LARGE corporations.
    SIZE MATTERS!
    Not too big and not too small.

    While California’s Initiative will probably not pass this year, Nevada’s probably will. They will be licensing a limited number of Cannabis Retail Stores and a small number of Commercial Producers. This is what we want to avoid in California because obviously the people that will be granted these Licenses will be connected and all the business will be concentrated into only a few companies.

    TAX: Whats interesting about the Nevada initiative is that the tax is $50 per ounce at the wholesale level. Being a set dollar figure and not a percentage is very good for the industry. At $50 per ounce, the pricepoints will be stabilized since a producer will probably need to get $150 – $200 per ounce in order to make a profit. These price points are obviously good for everyone.

    Humboldt Growers Guild
    Our mission is to work within the legalization movement in order to develop and protect the interests of a legal Humboldt Cannabis Industry.

    We have recently made contact with the MPP (Marijuana Policy Project). This is the group that is writing all these laws all around the country. We NEED to get involved with them so that our interests are represented. They have expressed interest in helping us.

    We are just now getting this going. We will be setting up shop and looking for funding. Already we have a prominent local donor very interested. This is a Special Interest group, and we will try and play the game as they have set the rules.

    WHO IS IN?? IT DEPENDS ON YOU!!

  • OK, OK, Lets do this!
    Couple things:
    Ammiano’s Bill is dead.
    The next thing coming up is a Tax and Regulate Ballot initiative in November. Nevada is also voting on a Tax and Regulate initiative this year.
    The California Initiative would legalize production (state wide) up to 25 square feet. !!
    That doesn’t do much.
    IT ALSO ALLOWS LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO CHANGE THE LIMITS.
    THIS is where we should be looking for our way to benefit Humboldt County.
    Higher Limits that allow for a profitable LEGAL grow BUT Low enough limits to keep the industry away from LARGE corporations.
    SIZE MATTERS!
    Not too big and not too small.

    While California’s Initiative will probably not pass this year, Nevada’s probably will. They will be licensing a limited number of Cannabis Retail Stores and a small number of Commercial Producers. This is what we want to avoid in California because obviously the people that will be granted these Licenses will be connected and all the business will be concentrated into only a few companies.

    TAX: Whats interesting about the Nevada initiative is that the tax is $50 per ounce at the wholesale level. Being a set dollar figure and not a percentage is very good for the industry. At $50 per ounce, the pricepoints will be stabilized since a producer will probably need to get $150 – $200 per ounce in order to make a profit. These price points are obviously good for everyone.

    Humboldt Growers Guild
    Our mission is to work within the legalization movement in order to develop and protect the interests of a legal Humboldt Cannabis Industry.

    We have recently made contact with the MPP (Marijuana Policy Project). This is the group that is writing all these laws all around the country. We NEED to get involved with them so that our interests are represented. They have expressed interest in helping us.

    We are just now getting this going. We will be setting up shop and looking for funding. Already we have a prominent local donor very interested. This is a Special Interest group, and we will try and play the game as they have set the rules.

    WHO IS IN?? IT DEPENDS ON YOU!!

  • I love this Idea. I’m going to snag this and make it a post so it doesn’t get skipped.

  • I love this Idea. I’m going to snag this and make it a post so it doesn’t get skipped.

  • Pingback: Show your Support for Humboldt Growers–HuGG One Today « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

  • Pingback: Show your Support for Humboldt Growers–HuGG One Today « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

  • Just paid $5 a gram for good Kush in another state at a dispensary…………..The Sky Is Falling, the sky is falling!

  • Just paid $5 a gram for good Kush in another state at a dispensary…………..The Sky Is Falling, the sky is falling!

  • Pingback: Marijuana Legalization Here We Come: The Tax Cannabis Initiative is on the Ballot « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

  • Pingback: Marijuana Legalization Here We Come: The Tax Cannabis Initiative is on the Ballot « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

  • Pingback: A Chronic Problem: SF Chronicle Disses Humboldt’s Concerns « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

  • Pingback: A Chronic Problem: SF Chronicle Disses Humboldt’s Concerns « REDHEADED BLACKBELT

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