Toking Tourists and a Marijuana Museum Here in Humboldt

Bud with Grape Leaf

Frequent Photo

“You can hang a grow light in a SoCali basement as easily as in a Humboldt grow house, but you can’t replicate a redwood forest terroir in a concrete jungle.” HighlikeMe

The excerpt above comes from an excellent post by the new Humboldt blogger Highlikeme.  In it s/he makes the argument that if Humboldt wants to continue as the weed capital of the western world, it needs to differentiate itself from weed elsewhere.  S/he’s right. We need to emulate Napa and the wine industry by making our area THE area for the toking tourist.

With the tsunami of legalization looming over our heads –it might well come in the next two years either through a ballot initiative this fall or through the state legislature–the whole North Coast  is only going to thrive  if it becomes the tourist destination of choice for the cannabis consumer.  What are some ways we can market ourselves now?

Below the fold, are my top six ways to promote The North Coast’s Marijuana Culture and bring in tourists–

_______________________________________________________________________________

1) More FestivalsReggae on the River (and Reggae Rising) already draw in thousands and the audience wants more than the music, they want the weed.  The Emerald Cup in December has the potential to become a huge draw for ganja guys and gals. The Emerald Cup, in a strange turn of events, is a marijuana competition  inspired by the Amsterdam Cannabis Cup which was originally based on the “spectacular California harvest festivals of the ’70s.”

There are already some fine music festivals in the area as well as some good local arts’ events and some that are hard to define–Mushroom Fair, the Hemp Festival, and Godwit days.   The more there are, and the more they are tied to the local marijuana, the better for the local economy.

2)More Places to visit –We do have some wonderful head shops (find your favorite at headshopfinder.com )and glass blowers in the area.  A clothing shop, The Hemp Connection, in Garberville, provides an excellent model for servicing both local residents and tourists ( I recommend reading this review as an example of how meeting the needs of toking tourists can translate into bringing more people into the area.)  However, we need something like a Marijuana museum which focuses on the local history aspect.

Another possible piece of infrastructure that would bring in medical marijuana tourists is if the  Garberville Hospital is converted to a dispensary/hospital–the first in the nation.

An exciting idea would be to have some small 215 grows available for people to visit.  The more places there are, the more likely people are to go out of their way to visit us.  A friend suggests these small farms could be called marijuanaries after the specialty wineries that make up much of Napa and the surrounding areas.

3)More Ads and subtle product placement see Miranda Gardens Resort Blog for an example of how subtle this can be.  In answer to a question about what is fun to do in the area, the responder manages to work in the “marijuana culture.” Of course, a far less subtle example is the movie, Humboldt County, which is one long product placement. Again, the more there are, the better it is for our economy–now and in the future.

4)Connect Napa to Humboldt-Encourage Tourists who are already visiting to Wine country to swing up north to see the marijuana world.  Tours of the Cannabis culture could be combined with tours of wine country both by bus and by bike.  As a bonus, our local breweries and wineries could benefit.

5) A Website –We need one that will promote where to find goods and services that the marijuana industry in the area can provide–take a look at this post on Marijuana.com. As good as some of our local tourist information is, we need one that shines a spotlight on the culture that provides the major stimulus to the local economies. Perhaps something called Smokin’ Places to Visit for the Marijuana Tourist. Or Eat, Drink, Toke: Humboldt County.

6) Focus on growing Unique Weed — see Highlikeme’s post for how many of us are doing it wrong now and how we should do it better.  We need to focus on producing high quality weed that has the unique flavors of the California fog and sunshine woven into its fiber–what we don’t need is more generic buds that can be produced anywhere.  That might mean that indoor growers should begin to work on developing unique outdoor strains at the same time they are still producing the indoor that they are making the most money on now.  (Mind you, I still think growing outdoor is best for the environment and can be nearly as profitable but if other people feel differently, those who can possibly get a small plot should still consider developing killer outdoor strains now to prepare for legalization.  This will be best for their financial future and for the future of the county.)

The more we layer the marijuana experience and conflate it with Humboldt and the North Coast, the more the toking tourist will flock to us to get a real taste of the marijuana world.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

46 comments

  • When marijuana becomes legal, what is going to keep corporations like Altria Group, Inc. (A.K.A. Philip Morris) from packaging their own brand with the ability to seriously undercut Humboldt Locals. If I were a local grower, I would think about starting a CO-OP with other local growers to stand against the corporations. Divided you will fall.

  • When marijuana becomes legal, what is going to keep corporations like Altria Group, Inc. (A.K.A. Philip Morris) from packaging their own brand with the ability to seriously undercut Humboldt Locals. If I were a local grower, I would think about starting a CO-OP with other local growers to stand against the corporations. Divided you will fall.

  • Hi Kym,
    I bought a new computer and forgot about your site for a couple of months. I missed it.

    The first time I ever saw a guerrilla grow (SoHum) I told my friend the grower that I thought it would be great to have a kind of ganja dude ranch in the future when weed was legal.

    That was about 12 years ago and now seems like a good idea. Bed and breakfast style accommodation, hiking in the hills, sampling of unique old and new strains of Humbud and the chance to to work in a guerilla style garden all for about $295 a day.

  • Hi Kym,
    I bought a new computer and forgot about your site for a couple of months. I missed it.

    The first time I ever saw a guerrilla grow (SoHum) I told my friend the grower that I thought it would be great to have a kind of ganja dude ranch in the future when weed was legal.

    That was about 12 years ago and now seems like a good idea. Bed and breakfast style accommodation, hiking in the hills, sampling of unique old and new strains of Humbud and the chance to to work in a guerilla style garden all for about $295 a day.

  • Kym-

    I can almost see the outline of a Headwaters Fund economic development proposal in this post. I wonder if cannabis has mainstreamed enough that the Humboldt Convention and Visitor’s Bureau might have an interest in your ideas. I suspect we aren’t quite there yet. I suppose it has some similarities with the rum-runners and speakeasies of the ’20s and ’30s: Nobody could have mainstreamed those as attractions while they remained illegal, but once alcohol became legal again, they both became part of the “local color” and tourist attractions. But as you mention, once it is legalized, it may be too late to capitalize on the Humboldt Terroir in the face of Altria and corporate ag. The other side of your argument that I find interesting is that someone should be systematically gathering the stories and writing the history from the 70’s onward, before memories fade (insert bad joke here).

  • Kym-

    I can almost see the outline of a Headwaters Fund economic development proposal in this post. I wonder if cannabis has mainstreamed enough that the Humboldt Convention and Visitor’s Bureau might have an interest in your ideas. I suspect we aren’t quite there yet. I suppose it has some similarities with the rum-runners and speakeasies of the ’20s and ’30s: Nobody could have mainstreamed those as attractions while they remained illegal, but once alcohol became legal again, they both became part of the “local color” and tourist attractions. But as you mention, once it is legalized, it may be too late to capitalize on the Humboldt Terroir in the face of Altria and corporate ag. The other side of your argument that I find interesting is that someone should be systematically gathering the stories and writing the history from the 70’s onward, before memories fade (insert bad joke here).

  • The beauty of this area has always been the big selling point. You just have to say “Humboldt County” and people will say “weed.”
    Maybe we already have a thriving marijuana tourism thing going on with our reputation. No one’s started a bus service yet, but it could happen I suppose.

    I get these funny images of Haight Asbury back in 1967-68, when the tourists sat in buses and gawked at the long-haired hippies puffing pot! I spent part of the summer of 1968 there and can tell you those tourists were a gas!

  • The beauty of this area has always been the big selling point. You just have to say “Humboldt County” and people will say “weed.”
    Maybe we already have a thriving marijuana tourism thing going on with our reputation. No one’s started a bus service yet, but it could happen I suppose.

    I get these funny images of Haight Asbury back in 1967-68, when the tourists sat in buses and gawked at the long-haired hippies puffing pot! I spent part of the summer of 1968 there and can tell you those tourists were a gas!

  • I thought that your readers might find the following link to be humorous. Chuckle for the day

  • I thought that your readers might find the following link to be humorous. Chuckle for the day

  • i dont think humboldt has much of a chance if legalization passes. It will be back to the sticks / welfare for most of us. Marijuana tourism wouldnt work well up here. what type of tourist would it bring? We have a lousy airport so international tourism would be low, we have no rail or port so a train / cruise ship wouldnt bring people here, we are 4-5 hours from any major citys! Plus the only reason sonoma / napa has done so well is the fact that they cater to a higher class with a much more dispensible income, It will not matter what amount of tourism we have here the stoner / bum vibe doesnt bring anyone with money infact it only scares off those who do have money, the humboldt redwood state park used to have 2x as many visitors 40 years ago. If we wanted to bring in tourism dollars we would also have to clean up our towns and make the area acomidating enough for tourist. So far only fortuna / garberville / eureka / trinidad / shelter cove / eureka can acomidate tourist with a high level of taste. even then these places lack basic services such a places to eat / things to do. If we really want to make humboldt about tourism we need to widen the richardson grove, bring more people up here and make it easyer to visit the northcoast! We also need to push the state parks more and get more national attention so people come and visit the redwoods! all in all this idea of legalization of marijuana will do nothing but destroy the local economy lower real estate values and create a mass exodus of people / buisnesses leaving the area. Humboldt will become like grants pass, or or any other crappy town with no economy and a dead timber industry!

    Hard times here we come!

  • i dont think humboldt has much of a chance if legalization passes. It will be back to the sticks / welfare for most of us. Marijuana tourism wouldnt work well up here. what type of tourist would it bring? We have a lousy airport so international tourism would be low, we have no rail or port so a train / cruise ship wouldnt bring people here, we are 4-5 hours from any major citys! Plus the only reason sonoma / napa has done so well is the fact that they cater to a higher class with a much more dispensible income, It will not matter what amount of tourism we have here the stoner / bum vibe doesnt bring anyone with money infact it only scares off those who do have money, the humboldt redwood state park used to have 2x as many visitors 40 years ago. If we wanted to bring in tourism dollars we would also have to clean up our towns and make the area acomidating enough for tourist. So far only fortuna / garberville / eureka / trinidad / shelter cove / eureka can acomidate tourist with a high level of taste. even then these places lack basic services such a places to eat / things to do. If we really want to make humboldt about tourism we need to widen the richardson grove, bring more people up here and make it easyer to visit the northcoast! We also need to push the state parks more and get more national attention so people come and visit the redwoods! all in all this idea of legalization of marijuana will do nothing but destroy the local economy lower real estate values and create a mass exodus of people / buisnesses leaving the area. Humboldt will become like grants pass, or or any other crappy town with no economy and a dead timber industry!

    Hard times here we come!

  • i’d be concerned, too, about ‘big business’ pushing out the locals. but, i also try and buy locally grown, organic veggies, so guess i’d look to the local growers for other stuff as well, eschewing the corporations

  • i’d be concerned, too, about ‘big business’ pushing out the locals. but, i also try and buy locally grown, organic veggies, so guess i’d look to the local growers for other stuff as well, eschewing the corporations

  • This is where we can still create our own reality, because it already exists! It’s definitely worth trying, even if only individual entrepreneurs can make the evolutions described here.

    The problem with a pot museum is that Main Street Garberville hates the idea even more than Eureka–and that’s normal. Chicago tried to prevent the opening of a tourist-oriented gangster museum, quashed it for years, more than 20 years ago. The museum immediately became what it remains, one of the biggest tourist draws in the city.

    It’s beyond dumb that our huge global brand is shunned rather than marketed by our ec dev county troglodytes. But it seems they’d rather we revert to Appalachia than embrace rural upstart ‘outsiders’ who’ve shown the way to prosperity and larger cultural norms for decades. It just hurts too hard, I guess.

  • This is where we can still create our own reality, because it already exists! It’s definitely worth trying, even if only individual entrepreneurs can make the evolutions described here.

    The problem with a pot museum is that Main Street Garberville hates the idea even more than Eureka–and that’s normal. Chicago tried to prevent the opening of a tourist-oriented gangster museum, quashed it for years, more than 20 years ago. The museum immediately became what it remains, one of the biggest tourist draws in the city.

    It’s beyond dumb that our huge global brand is shunned rather than marketed by our ec dev county troglodytes. But it seems they’d rather we revert to Appalachia than embrace rural upstart ‘outsiders’ who’ve shown the way to prosperity and larger cultural norms for decades. It just hurts too hard, I guess.

  • This thread is spooky its so timely and apropos. I get asked by my colleagues all the time about how we deal with our reputation and how we would respond to legalization. Just this last week I have told folks that I need to have a marijuana tourism marketing plan ready to go–and locked in my bottom drawer. I have no idea how the tourism industry or the local governments who fund HCCVB would feel about this issue–this is just my thinking and I answer to a board of directors and the folks who write the checks. But a few observations and comments on the above thread:

    1. Any targeted tourism market depends on the local business suppliers to turn an idea or a resource into a product. We would need that MJ museum, hands-on growing experiences, pot bars, special events, etc. before there would be anything to market. Having said that, if these services do develop then I fully intend to market them unless I get my hands tied. But I will lobby vigorously to serve this market. Marketing is about giving the customer what he wants, and the market will decide whether this form of tourism will thrive. Amsterdam seems to do okay.
    2. I don’t agree that this would attract only penniless stoners. It was the Baby Boomers who first popularized smoking pot in the 60s, and they would still be the primary market. They are now the ones with all the disposable income, desperate to recapture their rebellious youth, and they are the largest population cohort (also beginning to have more medical issues that pot can help with).
    3. We talk to thousands of consumers at travel shows all the time. Our market position is that Humboldt is the heart of the redwoods, and that will always remain our top destination driver. But, whenever we get a reaction to Humboldt as a marijuana producer, it is a positive one. People smile, nod knowingly and say, “Humboldt, yeah.” Notwithstanding the negative publicity that Arcata has been getting as Pot City USA, and the unquestionable bad impression that some HSU parents and prospective parents get from the Plaza, on the whole our reputation helps. Probably because for the most part it is the people who appreciate such things that are actually aware of our reputation in the first place.
    4. I think it was Duane Flatmo who described Arcata as “Where the 60s meet the sea.” If I was asked to developed a tourism marketing program for Redwood Coast Chronic, I would totally embrace the 1960s and a sanitized version of hippie culture. The rest of the world already sees California as the land of fruits and nuts–people who live out their passions, take risks, embrace change, etc. We fit really well into that vision.
    5. It is true that Humboldt weed is a huge global brand, but it is nothing compared to the global awareness of the redwoods. We are still talking a niche market. It would add to the bottom line but won’t reinvent our tourism industry, which, by the way, is doing pretty well. The north coast has experienced the least decline (1%) in occupancy and (2.4%) room rates of any destination in California.

    So, I just wanted to point out that we’re not all economic development troglodytes. Our eye is on the ball, but we won’t do anything that would risk our success in the bigger game. We are living through a cultural transformation–hopefully–in which values of individual responsibility and tolerance will triumph. I hope that in ten years we will be looking back and wondering what all the fuss was about–oh waiter, I’ll have the Humboldt Classic Sativa.

    • Glad to see someone with a clue about this. Your analysis is very enlightening.

      Google does 110,000 results related to humboldt redwoods, 1.75 million for humboldt cannabis and 2.4 million for humboldt marijuana. (I notice Highboltage is high on those results, good job Bill.) Amsterdam cannabis/marijuana pulls 1.1 million results.

      The association is already out there. I would contend that Humboldt it is the world’s leading brand of MJ.

      Are you that redwoods website person? If so, bravo dude, I show that to my people down south. Certain other places… let’s just call them city of a, county of h, eureka chamber of c, and h – guide… are so bad that I wonder if they are still using AOL disks. At least that redwoods site makes our county look like smart people do indeed live here. Nevermind if you have no idea what I’m talking about.

  • This thread is spooky its so timely and apropos. I get asked by my colleagues all the time about how we deal with our reputation and how we would respond to legalization. Just this last week I have told folks that I need to have a marijuana tourism marketing plan ready to go–and locked in my bottom drawer. I have no idea how the tourism industry or the local governments who fund HCCVB would feel about this issue–this is just my thinking and I answer to a board of directors and the folks who write the checks. But a few observations and comments on the above thread:

    1. Any targeted tourism market depends on the local business suppliers to turn an idea or a resource into a product. We would need that MJ museum, hands-on growing experiences, pot bars, special events, etc. before there would be anything to market. Having said that, if these services do develop then I fully intend to market them unless I get my hands tied. But I will lobby vigorously to serve this market. Marketing is about giving the customer what he wants, and the market will decide whether this form of tourism will thrive. Amsterdam seems to do okay.
    2. I don’t agree that this would attract only penniless stoners. It was the Baby Boomers who first popularized smoking pot in the 60s, and they would still be the primary market. They are now the ones with all the disposable income, desperate to recapture their rebellious youth, and they are the largest population cohort (also beginning to have more medical issues that pot can help with).
    3. We talk to thousands of consumers at travel shows all the time. Our market position is that Humboldt is the heart of the redwoods, and that will always remain our top destination driver. But, whenever we get a reaction to Humboldt as a marijuana producer, it is a positive one. People smile, nod knowingly and say, “Humboldt, yeah.” Notwithstanding the negative publicity that Arcata has been getting as Pot City USA, and the unquestionable bad impression that some HSU parents and prospective parents get from the Plaza, on the whole our reputation helps. Probably because for the most part it is the people who appreciate such things that are actually aware of our reputation in the first place.
    4. I think it was Duane Flatmo who described Arcata as “Where the 60s meet the sea.” If I was asked to developed a tourism marketing program for Redwood Coast Chronic, I would totally embrace the 1960s and a sanitized version of hippie culture. The rest of the world already sees California as the land of fruits and nuts–people who live out their passions, take risks, embrace change, etc. We fit really well into that vision.
    5. It is true that Humboldt weed is a huge global brand, but it is nothing compared to the global awareness of the redwoods. We are still talking a niche market. It would add to the bottom line but won’t reinvent our tourism industry, which, by the way, is doing pretty well. The north coast has experienced the least decline (1%) in occupancy and (2.4%) room rates of any destination in California.

    So, I just wanted to point out that we’re not all economic development troglodytes. Our eye is on the ball, but we won’t do anything that would risk our success in the bigger game. We are living through a cultural transformation–hopefully–in which values of individual responsibility and tolerance will triumph. I hope that in ten years we will be looking back and wondering what all the fuss was about–oh waiter, I’ll have the Humboldt Classic Sativa.

    • Glad to see someone with a clue about this. Your analysis is very enlightening.

      Google does 110,000 results related to humboldt redwoods, 1.75 million for humboldt cannabis and 2.4 million for humboldt marijuana. (I notice Highboltage is high on those results, good job Bill.) Amsterdam cannabis/marijuana pulls 1.1 million results.

      The association is already out there. I would contend that Humboldt it is the world’s leading brand of MJ.

      Are you that redwoods website person? If so, bravo dude, I show that to my people down south. Certain other places… let’s just call them city of a, county of h, eureka chamber of c, and h – guide… are so bad that I wonder if they are still using AOL disks. At least that redwoods site makes our county look like smart people do indeed live here. Nevermind if you have no idea what I’m talking about.

  • James, I like your idea about starting a marijuana farmers’ co-op. Mendocino is trying to start one now and I am more than intrigued!

    Mr. T Welcome back (I missed you!) Bed breakfast and a bong–it could work;>

    Zeno, Now if we only knew someone learned enough to write a grant proposal to the headwaters fund. Somehow I feel that supporting Marijuana tourism would be one of the ideas most in keeping with the spirit of the whole thing.

    Dave, The buses could be painted with peace symbols and hung with love beads. Jefferson Airplane could blast from the speakers and those with a 215 could take a toke right on the bus;>

    Joe, I agree that our infrastructure could use some improvement–good point. Though don’t we have cruise ships occasionally in Eureka now? And you’re right, it is pretty damn obvious if we don’t do something we will end up dying horribly. I just think that legalization is coming and we need to prepare for it if we don’t want to face that horrible death. Like Tony says in the comment above, I think we can capture a fairly moneyed crowd of toking tourists if we package ourselves right. Hmm, where the 60’s rock between the redwoods and the sea?

    Gnukid, I hope the locals buy local but, hypocritically, I hope those in other areas want to buy Humboldt;>

    Longwind,
    I worry about the fact that the local business owners are somewhat skeptical about the marijuana money ie by supporting a mj museum. I plan to use your point about the gangster museum next time I have this discussion!

    Tony, Yes! you said so much of what I believe. And I take your point about Humboldt weed being nothing compared to the global awareness of the redwoods–though I would point out that when I mention living in Humboldt to outsiders their first response relates more to green weed than redwood:>

  • James, I like your idea about starting a marijuana farmers’ co-op. Mendocino is trying to start one now and I am more than intrigued!

    Mr. T Welcome back (I missed you!) Bed breakfast and a bong–it could work;>

    Zeno, Now if we only knew someone learned enough to write a grant proposal to the headwaters fund. Somehow I feel that supporting Marijuana tourism would be one of the ideas most in keeping with the spirit of the whole thing.

    Dave, The buses could be painted with peace symbols and hung with love beads. Jefferson Airplane could blast from the speakers and those with a 215 could take a toke right on the bus;>

    Joe, I agree that our infrastructure could use some improvement–good point. Though don’t we have cruise ships occasionally in Eureka now? And you’re right, it is pretty damn obvious if we don’t do something we will end up dying horribly. I just think that legalization is coming and we need to prepare for it if we don’t want to face that horrible death. Like Tony says in the comment above, I think we can capture a fairly moneyed crowd of toking tourists if we package ourselves right. Hmm, where the 60’s rock between the redwoods and the sea?

    Gnukid, I hope the locals buy local but, hypocritically, I hope those in other areas want to buy Humboldt;>

    Longwind,
    I worry about the fact that the local business owners are somewhat skeptical about the marijuana money ie by supporting a mj museum. I plan to use your point about the gangster museum next time I have this discussion!

    Tony, Yes! you said so much of what I believe. And I take your point about Humboldt weed being nothing compared to the global awareness of the redwoods–though I would point out that when I mention living in Humboldt to outsiders their first response relates more to green weed than redwood:>

  • Tony, thanks for your very interesting (and undeservedly polite) contribution. It’s good to know this subject is sneaking up toward the front burner.

    As a naturalized transplant who went gaga for redwoods, I have a marketing wrinkle to run by you. While our redwoods are indeed a global symbol on a par with Chicago gangsters and stockyards (neither of which have actually existed as imagined for 70 years), I think it’s important to grasp why Redwoods National Park is the second-least-visited National Park in the country. Redwoods may be like Death Valley or the polar ice cap–everyone’s glad they’re there, but few want to visit. Why? Because redwoods are the ANTI-California: cold and wet and oozing nature, while most people come to California for our warm and dry bikinis on martini beaches. It seems to me that building our redwoods ecosystem brand can only grow by hollowing out f the larger California brand it’s an odd little offshoot of.

    But, as you say, sanitized yuppie potheads embody the larger California dream, as well as our corner of it. Tourist development here has grown very, very slowly, while our Parks use has plummeted, for larger social reasons I suppose. But who wouldn’t want to smoke a spliff on a comfy sofa and contemplate our great outdoors, cross-eyed? In that market, we could become almost as real as Avatar.

    thanks for sharing, I bet you get a lot of free advice . . .

  • Tony, thanks for your very interesting (and undeservedly polite) contribution. It’s good to know this subject is sneaking up toward the front burner.

    As a naturalized transplant who went gaga for redwoods, I have a marketing wrinkle to run by you. While our redwoods are indeed a global symbol on a par with Chicago gangsters and stockyards (neither of which have actually existed as imagined for 70 years), I think it’s important to grasp why Redwoods National Park is the second-least-visited National Park in the country. Redwoods may be like Death Valley or the polar ice cap–everyone’s glad they’re there, but few want to visit. Why? Because redwoods are the ANTI-California: cold and wet and oozing nature, while most people come to California for our warm and dry bikinis on martini beaches. It seems to me that building our redwoods ecosystem brand can only grow by hollowing out f the larger California brand it’s an odd little offshoot of.

    But, as you say, sanitized yuppie potheads embody the larger California dream, as well as our corner of it. Tourist development here has grown very, very slowly, while our Parks use has plummeted, for larger social reasons I suppose. But who wouldn’t want to smoke a spliff on a comfy sofa and contemplate our great outdoors, cross-eyed? In that market, we could become almost as real as Avatar.

    thanks for sharing, I bet you get a lot of free advice . . .

  • How about the Stoned Artist Gallery? …if we can find any artists that, uh, create under the influence, somewhere… there must be some…somewhere in the County.

  • How about the Stoned Artist Gallery? …if we can find any artists that, uh, create under the influence, somewhere… there must be some…somewhere in the County.

  • Other citys in america are better positioned to become the tourist hub of californias weed scean, First all if weed want illigal there would be no reason to hide in the hills up in california, Also lets remember it would still be illigal on federal level even if california legalized it. Also Oaksterdam “oakland” and SF/Bay area or LA or even Santa Cruz would pull in WAY more tourist and quickly become the pot tourist hubs. Think of it do you go to elko nevada to go gambling, no you go to las vegas or possibly reno. with multiple bigger tourist destinations that could easily offer more fun / excitment than humboldt. Lets just face it if its legalized it will not fix any problems in humboldt, it will make everything worse. People will be poor again, the rural areas will get cheaper and cheaper and people will flee the area for places that can actualy provide jobs. the weed bubble will of burst and garbervilles / humboldt hay day will be over. we will crash and garberville will look like rio dell does now. There will be more crime and more meth / heroin also big buisness will take over and make all the money. even if the little guy paves the way for legalization the big guys will buy out and consolidate the market and in time will monopolize it like all other markets. Not to mention it will not fix any budget problems because throwing money at a broken government never solves anything they just waste it.

  • Other citys in america are better positioned to become the tourist hub of californias weed scean, First all if weed want illigal there would be no reason to hide in the hills up in california, Also lets remember it would still be illigal on federal level even if california legalized it. Also Oaksterdam “oakland” and SF/Bay area or LA or even Santa Cruz would pull in WAY more tourist and quickly become the pot tourist hubs. Think of it do you go to elko nevada to go gambling, no you go to las vegas or possibly reno. with multiple bigger tourist destinations that could easily offer more fun / excitment than humboldt. Lets just face it if its legalized it will not fix any problems in humboldt, it will make everything worse. People will be poor again, the rural areas will get cheaper and cheaper and people will flee the area for places that can actualy provide jobs. the weed bubble will of burst and garbervilles / humboldt hay day will be over. we will crash and garberville will look like rio dell does now. There will be more crime and more meth / heroin also big buisness will take over and make all the money. even if the little guy paves the way for legalization the big guys will buy out and consolidate the market and in time will monopolize it like all other markets. Not to mention it will not fix any budget problems because throwing money at a broken government never solves anything they just waste it.

  • Napa has had only 4% drop in wine sales during the past year while keeping prices high. That suggests a certain competitive advantage in the classic sense of international economics. All remaining sectors of the Humboldt economy need to catch up to that concept by developing a market strategy. That would of course require some degree of organization and cooperation. Too late for fishing, the resource base is too degraded. Logging is largely yesteryear and the old Demonstration Forests no longer are there to even provide the propaganda next to the highway. Tourism depends on the price of gas and economic conditions in the larger region as well as the attractions. Time to capitalize on the branding and do what we do best in the most competitive ways. However, the attitude that “you don’t need new friends” and “lets cut down the signs” is only going to hurt. The fifth-generation old-timer Indian-fighter aging-hippy image is not perceived as even quaint by business people who go where they are wanted and stay where they are well treated. Eliminate the negative drags on the market by upgrading the culture into a more accommodating and less isolated place to visit and do business. Do you ever wonder why there are fewer tourists at the state parks since the advent of the current pot culture? Now they carry .357’s.

  • Napa has had only 4% drop in wine sales during the past year while keeping prices high. That suggests a certain competitive advantage in the classic sense of international economics. All remaining sectors of the Humboldt economy need to catch up to that concept by developing a market strategy. That would of course require some degree of organization and cooperation. Too late for fishing, the resource base is too degraded. Logging is largely yesteryear and the old Demonstration Forests no longer are there to even provide the propaganda next to the highway. Tourism depends on the price of gas and economic conditions in the larger region as well as the attractions. Time to capitalize on the branding and do what we do best in the most competitive ways. However, the attitude that “you don’t need new friends” and “lets cut down the signs” is only going to hurt. The fifth-generation old-timer Indian-fighter aging-hippy image is not perceived as even quaint by business people who go where they are wanted and stay where they are well treated. Eliminate the negative drags on the market by upgrading the culture into a more accommodating and less isolated place to visit and do business. Do you ever wonder why there are fewer tourists at the state parks since the advent of the current pot culture? Now they carry .357’s.

  • why come here when san fran will offer better food, clean hotels, customer service, and the same corporate weed available, there will be no reason to come here to see a wasteland with post industrial bay-

    people should have thought of being nice to tourism dollars years ago, humboldt’s image as filthy, rude, inbreds will never leave-

    even if the broken yokels now want to kiss tourist ass and beg for food

    most growers are about to lose everything they have worked for, and nobody cares.

    take out the trash, bring in fresh air- legal weed will kill the neo-hippy, faster than a home depot would shutter pierson’s.

    • I kinda, sorta agree with Black Flag’s final point, but with a caveat. My post – and, btw, thanks for the link and the shoutout, Kym – was prompted by what I saw as the apathy about the coming change. Kym’s thoughtful post prompted just the sort of discussion that I had expected to find, from one end of the Emerald Triangle to the other, but didn’t. The fact is, SF offers amenities that can be matched by very few large cities, anywhere. Small cities and towns like ours (Eureka, Arcata, Mendocino) shouldn’t try to compete; instead, we should celebrate what we have, and – and this is my caveat – what we have had. Hey Tony, make that two Humboldt Classics.

      Heirloom weed, not corporate weed!

  • why come here when san fran will offer better food, clean hotels, customer service, and the same corporate weed available, there will be no reason to come here to see a wasteland with post industrial bay-

    people should have thought of being nice to tourism dollars years ago, humboldt’s image as filthy, rude, inbreds will never leave-

    even if the broken yokels now want to kiss tourist ass and beg for food

    most growers are about to lose everything they have worked for, and nobody cares.

    take out the trash, bring in fresh air- legal weed will kill the neo-hippy, faster than a home depot would shutter pierson’s.

    • I kinda, sorta agree with Black Flag’s final point, but with a caveat. My post – and, btw, thanks for the link and the shoutout, Kym – was prompted by what I saw as the apathy about the coming change. Kym’s thoughtful post prompted just the sort of discussion that I had expected to find, from one end of the Emerald Triangle to the other, but didn’t. The fact is, SF offers amenities that can be matched by very few large cities, anywhere. Small cities and towns like ours (Eureka, Arcata, Mendocino) shouldn’t try to compete; instead, we should celebrate what we have, and – and this is my caveat – what we have had. Hey Tony, make that two Humboldt Classics.

      Heirloom weed, not corporate weed!

  • How about a “Certified by Humboldt” branding that corporate can’t touch? Just a passing thought.

  • How about a “Certified by Humboldt” branding that corporate can’t touch? Just a passing thought.

    • I was reading this yesterday and cracking up. The ones that tickled me most was
      19. All the hot local concerts would be full of stoners and be smelly. Yuck, who wants to smell skunks at reggae and blues shows?
      28. It’s a slippery slope to LSD, Mushrooms, Gay Marriage, Beastiality and the like.[ Not to mention, our children sporting tattoos and piercings

    • I was reading this yesterday and cracking up. The ones that tickled me most was
      19. All the hot local concerts would be full of stoners and be smelly. Yuck, who wants to smell skunks at reggae and blues shows?
      28. It’s a slippery slope to LSD, Mushrooms, Gay Marriage, Beastiality and the like.[ Not to mention, our children sporting tattoos and piercings

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *