Will Napa Valley be just a side trip on the way to the Emerald Triangle?

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Could the Emerald Triangle’s Marijuana business overshadow Napa Valley as one of the foremost tourist venues in California?  An article in the Daily Caller (a Conservative news site), cites Aaron Smith, head of the Marijuana Policy Project based out of Washington, DC, ““[Legalization] will launch the birth of legal multi-billion dollar industry, that some think could one day overshadow the wine business, and make Napa Valley just a side trip on the way to the Emerald Triangle.”

The article goes on to assert that savvy people are already hoarding large tracks of land suitable for marijuana agriculture in the North Coast area.  It quotes a Ferndale Realtor as saying, “With legalization prospects constantly in the news, few land-owners would sell now, which naturally props up land values by diminishing the supply.”

The article then speculates what the future here in Humbuldt will look like. “There will likely emerge a Robert Mondavi of the marijuana business. Agriculture companies will race to build marijuana harvesters, tractors and seeders. New pot-specific fertilizers and pesticides will be sought. [Obviously the author has missed the fertilizers etc. being advertised nearly non-stop in the hydro stores here in Humboldt.] Commercial development catering to hemp outfitters and smoke shops, like those in Amsterdam, will break ground and revitalize infrastructure. Counties will immediately see the benefits of increased tourism, which industry experts expect to surge in the region.”

The future painted after legalization is pretty rosy for Humboldt.

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50 comments

  • Do you think Sun Valley would switch to marijuana instead of flowers? Pretty likely. They are sitting pretty. Already set up for light dep and year ’round cultivation. Just say the word.

  • What makes him think that the real marijuana growing will take place up here in this remote, hard-to-reach area? Once legalized, the business minded pot growers and big agribusinesses will move where its easier and cheaper to grow and transport their product. Likely there would be chic marijuana bars and resorts and cafes all up and down 101 for tourists but the real business end might be over on highway 5.

  • Check out the article we did on Redway’s own Trim Scene Solutions…..
    http://mendonews.wordpress.com/check-out-our-sponsor-trim-scene-solutions-inc/

    Were also on Facebook now!

    The Emerald Triangle News

  • Check out the article we did on Redway’s own Trim Scene Solutions…..
    http://mendonews.wordpress.com/check-out-our-sponsor-trim-scene-solutions-inc/

    Were also on Facebook now!

    The Emerald Triangle News

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  • After years of breaking into tourist cars, serving them poor quality food, dirty motels, and in general rude comments- these people are going to come back and save pink humdum asses when the black market is turned over to the government? Get a grip….
    It will destroy what’s left of this area, bring business failure, real estate crash, and will in fact draw less people to the area- less people equals deflation in the local economy.
    I would think some UN backed land grab co will buy up the foreclosed ranches and set up buffer zones near national park/forest and no longer allow building within 50 miles of a park, just like the UN does in Alaska- steals land.
    A vote is a stupid thing to do for starters, but to vote to give a market to government is even dumber.

  • After years of breaking into tourist cars, serving them poor quality food, dirty motels, and in general rude comments- these people are going to come back and save pink humdum asses when the black market is turned over to the government? Get a grip….
    It will destroy what’s left of this area, bring business failure, real estate crash, and will in fact draw less people to the area- less people equals deflation in the local economy.
    I would think some UN backed land grab co will buy up the foreclosed ranches and set up buffer zones near national park/forest and no longer allow building within 50 miles of a park, just like the UN does in Alaska- steals land.
    A vote is a stupid thing to do for starters, but to vote to give a market to government is even dumber.

  • This is such a big subject that it would be impossible to place in a “comment”.

    The people that think legalization will help Humboldt County are smoking too much of their own fantasy. “Emerald Triangle Boutique Marijuana” is a myth. Wine, or beer, or any alcohol for that matter, takes much processing, and it is easier to just buy. Anybody that can grow a tomato plant can, and will, grow their own marijuana. Just ask any grower that you know, they will tell you; “why buy marijuana, when It grows like a weed in my yard?” So marijuana will essentially have close to zero value as a salable product.

    Those that think that Amsterdam is the promised land, simply don’t read. Marijuana use, and the sale of it is highly regulated. Some detractors are hoping to ban it.

    By some estimates, marijuana is eighty percent of the Garberville economy. If they legalize marijuana, there won’t be an immediate affect. Just like we are slowly spiraling-in by thinking we are saving money by buying cheap Chinese goods, while sending all of our money to China. It takes a while to really feel the hurt that legalization will bring us.

    But, like most things, what we say or do will have little to do with the legalization of the weed. We would be wise to prepare for that eventuality, But, to think that it will help the economy is fuzzy thinking.

    • Ernie, I agree that anyone who can grow a tomato plant can grow a marijuana plant but, there are less and less people able to do that. Organic heirloom tomatoes are absolutely delicious so why does anyone buy those wet cardboardy things usually for sale in grocery stores…They do it because they don’t have land, they have never grown, and because they don’t know any different. I’ve read and been told how when people from other areas taste the fine local cannabis, they are astounded. That is because they haven’t had access to good stuff. The North Coast growers need to make sure that smokers elsewhere are aware of the differences between great, good, mediocre and bad weed.

      In fact CNC just did a nice little piece about this here http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/2010/01/wine-dope-cnbc-critics-and-my-30-seconds-of-fame.html
      The blog that the video is on rates wine and has been discussing (the author was quoted in the video) rating marijuana.

  • This is such a big subject that it would be impossible to place in a “comment”.

    The people that think legalization will help Humboldt County are smoking too much of their own fantasy. “Emerald Triangle Boutique Marijuana” is a myth. Wine, or beer, or any alcohol for that matter, takes much processing, and it is easier to just buy. Anybody that can grow a tomato plant can, and will, grow their own marijuana. Just ask any grower that you know, they will tell you; “why buy marijuana, when It grows like a weed in my yard?” So marijuana will essentially have close to zero value as a salable product.

    Those that think that Amsterdam is the promised land, simply don’t read. Marijuana use, and the sale of it is highly regulated. Some detractors are hoping to ban it.

    By some estimates, marijuana is eighty percent of the Garberville economy. If they legalize marijuana, there won’t be an immediate affect. Just like we are slowly spiraling-in by thinking we are saving money by buying cheap Chinese goods, while sending all of our money to China. It takes a while to really feel the hurt that legalization will bring us.

    But, like most things, what we say or do will have little to do with the legalization of the weed. We would be wise to prepare for that eventuality, But, to think that it will help the economy is fuzzy thinking.

    • Ernie, I agree that anyone who can grow a tomato plant can grow a marijuana plant but, there are less and less people able to do that. Organic heirloom tomatoes are absolutely delicious so why does anyone buy those wet cardboardy things usually for sale in grocery stores…They do it because they don’t have land, they have never grown, and because they don’t know any different. I’ve read and been told how when people from other areas taste the fine local cannabis, they are astounded. That is because they haven’t had access to good stuff. The North Coast growers need to make sure that smokers elsewhere are aware of the differences between great, good, mediocre and bad weed.

      In fact CNC just did a nice little piece about this here http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/2010/01/wine-dope-cnbc-critics-and-my-30-seconds-of-fame.html
      The blog that the video is on rates wine and has been discussing (the author was quoted in the video) rating marijuana.

  • Commercial scale cannabis sucks and won’t be medical grade. How is having a Robert Mondavi gonna be a rosy picture? We cant do away with what works and is best, small scale organic grows, keeping money spread out, and keeping the living wage for the workers, trimmers are not exploited and get a living wage….what the fuck is Robert Mondavi… See More gonna pay? I really dont think they have the predictions right, as I believe many users have high standards and want “Green” green, non of that factory farmed chemical shit! Duh! WTF.

  • Commercial scale cannabis sucks and won’t be medical grade. How is having a Robert Mondavi gonna be a rosy picture? We cant do away with what works and is best, small scale organic grows, keeping money spread out, and keeping the living wage for the workers, trimmers are not exploited and get a living wage….what the fuck is Robert Mondavi… See More gonna pay? I really dont think they have the predictions right, as I believe many users have high standards and want “Green” green, non of that factory farmed chemical shit! Duh! WTF.

  • I wish more people would take a good look at this idea, as it is totally feasible. All I can say to the naysayers is that 40 years ago Napa was a backwater county, economically depressed, largely rural, and full of rednecks and reprobates (sound familiar?). Now, most of us would be lucky if we could afford to buy a broom closet in Napa.

    Some folks are already making the move. Some of the Arcata crowd is working on getting the American Museum of Marijuana up and running and I believe the target date for the opening is this spring. Throw in a couple of coffeeehouses, a tour of a fat garden, and a nice dinner and you could market this nationwide. Sure, all the jaded Californians will yawn, but in the meantime someone in Alabama will be planning their vacation.

    People will pay. And M3 is right, if we don’t jump on it, outside interests will. As for those who believe that my thinking may be “fuzzy,” well, all your objections don’t add up to a hill of spit in the face of the fact that a multi-million dollar marijuana agribusiness already exists (like it or not). It’s not so hard to build on something if the foundation is already poured for you,

    • “As for those who believe that my thinking may be “fuzzy,” well, all your objections don’t add up to a hill of spit in the face of the fact that a multi-million dollar marijuana agribusiness already exists.”

      My point is, that the only reason that you have a multi-million dollar industry is because it’s ILLEGAL. That is the foundation that that you have now. Your foundation gets a little crumbly when you add legalization. I’m not trying to be argumentative or disrespectful. But, I still find the “boutique” a little bit of a stretch. I think that you are whistling through the graveyard.

      Time will tell won’t it? See you on the other side…

    • Planning that vacation now Randy!

  • I wish more people would take a good look at this idea, as it is totally feasible. All I can say to the naysayers is that 40 years ago Napa was a backwater county, economically depressed, largely rural, and full of rednecks and reprobates (sound familiar?). Now, most of us would be lucky if we could afford to buy a broom closet in Napa.

    Some folks are already making the move. Some of the Arcata crowd is working on getting the American Museum of Marijuana up and running and I believe the target date for the opening is this spring. Throw in a couple of coffeeehouses, a tour of a fat garden, and a nice dinner and you could market this nationwide. Sure, all the jaded Californians will yawn, but in the meantime someone in Alabama will be planning their vacation.

    People will pay. And M3 is right, if we don’t jump on it, outside interests will. As for those who believe that my thinking may be “fuzzy,” well, all your objections don’t add up to a hill of spit in the face of the fact that a multi-million dollar marijuana agribusiness already exists (like it or not). It’s not so hard to build on something if the foundation is already poured for you,

    • “As for those who believe that my thinking may be “fuzzy,” well, all your objections don’t add up to a hill of spit in the face of the fact that a multi-million dollar marijuana agribusiness already exists.”

      My point is, that the only reason that you have a multi-million dollar industry is because it’s ILLEGAL. That is the foundation that that you have now. Your foundation gets a little crumbly when you add legalization. I’m not trying to be argumentative or disrespectful. But, I still find the “boutique” a little bit of a stretch. I think that you are whistling through the graveyard.

      Time will tell won’t it? See you on the other side…

    • Planning that vacation now Randy!

  • Yes, I do understand that prohibition inflates the price, but I disagree that legalization equals a market crash. For example, what happened when alcohol prohibition ended? Did the market for booze simply dry up and disappear? Did people stop drinking once the outlaw aspect was taken away? No, instead it evolved into spendy wine tours, booze cruises, $10 a bottle microbrews, and a liquor store on every other corner. Yes, it is regulated, but this is just the govt.’s way to make easy money, as the regulation is all about taxation and has very little to do with restricting availability.

    I mean no disrespect either, Ernie, but consider this: when you were a kid growing up here, did it seem possible or even likely that a multi-million dollar illegal industry would arrive here and take root? Yet it has taken root with a vengeance. So if that unlikely occurence was able to take place, I’ll take my chances with the legalization economy.

    Besides, what do I have to lose? I’m currently unemployed in an area where the ‘for sale’ ads for grow equipment is three times longer than help wanted ads in the Sunday paper , none of which I qualify for anyway. So I have a choice: try to move forward with what’s available, or pack up and leave (again).

    Frankly, I’m not going anywhere. I love it here and I’ll do what it takes to stay.

    I’m preparing for “the other side” actively rather than passively.

    • Randy, mostly I agree with you. But when prohibition ended, the moonshiners in the hills didn’t reap the benefits of legalization because they failed to prepare for it (My great great uncle was Cy Cole a local moonshiner so I know.) Other than that small caveat, I find myself nodding as I read what you write.

      • “when prohibition ended, the moonshiners in the hills didn’t reap the benefits of legalization because they failed to prepare for it”

        Good point Kym. They should have developed a vat of boutique ‘shine, and called it “The Cream Of the South Fork Crick” The Mountain booze with the primo kick”. They would have made a fortune stealing customers away from corporate booze makers. They really blew it!

        Actually, bootleggers had a starvation business for a while after legalization, because they thought that they could break even, or compete, because nobody wanted to pay the taxes. (my grandfather also sold a little ‘shine out of his service station) Cheap corporate booze and the revenuers soon took them out.

        In your preparation for the other side of “legal”, you need to prepare for the fact that the corporations will have the law on their side, and they own the lawmakers.

        Again, my statements may sound confrontational, but I really don’t want to be offensive. I just don’t think it won’t be as rosy as you think. Some of the babble out there is being put upon us by the big business people. Be careful what you believe.

        • Ernie, In them there days, there was a craze for modern big business. Today, there is a large turn towards organic, local, small, boutique buisnesses (look at the beer makers for instance–Yes, there are the Coors but there are also the Eel River Brewing Companies.) I think that small marijuana growers have a chance BUT I do agree that the corporations will try to warp the law for their benefit. One of the wonders of the illegal marijuana culture is that it allows people to thrive outside of the normal avenues through corporations. That is one of the reason I love this independent counties up here in the hills of California.

          • Kym
            You might be right. It kills me to see people pay a dollar a bottle for water in a plastic bottle. PLASTIC!!! what the heck are they thinking? Somehow they think that they are getting something better if they pay for it. I would hope that people would use their heads. They should take a glass jug and fill it out of the many pristine springs that So Hum has. Most notably, the one in Holbrook grove north of Redway. No houses near, or above it for miles. Plastic… I hope their liver doesn’t die, and I hope their plastic bottle doesn’t float in the ocean for and eternity, or kill fish.

            Yeah, they will probably pay for “boutique”.

  • Yes, I do understand that prohibition inflates the price, but I disagree that legalization equals a market crash. For example, what happened when alcohol prohibition ended? Did the market for booze simply dry up and disappear? Did people stop drinking once the outlaw aspect was taken away? No, instead it evolved into spendy wine tours, booze cruises, $10 a bottle microbrews, and a liquor store on every other corner. Yes, it is regulated, but this is just the govt.’s way to make easy money, as the regulation is all about taxation and has very little to do with restricting availability.

    I mean no disrespect either, Ernie, but consider this: when you were a kid growing up here, did it seem possible or even likely that a multi-million dollar illegal industry would arrive here and take root? Yet it has taken root with a vengeance. So if that unlikely occurence was able to take place, I’ll take my chances with the legalization economy.

    Besides, what do I have to lose? I’m currently unemployed in an area where the ‘for sale’ ads for grow equipment is three times longer than help wanted ads in the Sunday paper , none of which I qualify for anyway. So I have a choice: try to move forward with what’s available, or pack up and leave (again).

    Frankly, I’m not going anywhere. I love it here and I’ll do what it takes to stay.

    I’m preparing for “the other side” actively rather than passively.

    • Randy, mostly I agree with you. But when prohibition ended, the moonshiners in the hills didn’t reap the benefits of legalization because they failed to prepare for it (My great great uncle was Cy Cole a local moonshiner so I know.) Other than that small caveat, I find myself nodding as I read what you write.

      • “when prohibition ended, the moonshiners in the hills didn’t reap the benefits of legalization because they failed to prepare for it”

        Good point Kym. They should have developed a vat of boutique ‘shine, and called it “The Cream Of the South Fork Crick” The Mountain booze with the primo kick”. They would have made a fortune stealing customers away from corporate booze makers. They really blew it!

        Actually, bootleggers had a starvation business for a while after legalization, because they thought that they could break even, or compete, because nobody wanted to pay the taxes. (my grandfather also sold a little ‘shine out of his service station) Cheap corporate booze and the revenuers soon took them out.

        In your preparation for the other side of “legal”, you need to prepare for the fact that the corporations will have the law on their side, and they own the lawmakers.

        Again, my statements may sound confrontational, but I really don’t want to be offensive. I just don’t think it won’t be as rosy as you think. Some of the babble out there is being put upon us by the big business people. Be careful what you believe.

        • Ernie, In them there days, there was a craze for modern big business. Today, there is a large turn towards organic, local, small, boutique buisnesses (look at the beer makers for instance–Yes, there are the Coors but there are also the Eel River Brewing Companies.) I think that small marijuana growers have a chance BUT I do agree that the corporations will try to warp the law for their benefit. One of the wonders of the illegal marijuana culture is that it allows people to thrive outside of the normal avenues through corporations. That is one of the reason I love this independent counties up here in the hills of California.

          • Kym
            You might be right. It kills me to see people pay a dollar a bottle for water in a plastic bottle. PLASTIC!!! what the heck are they thinking? Somehow they think that they are getting something better if they pay for it. I would hope that people would use their heads. They should take a glass jug and fill it out of the many pristine springs that So Hum has. Most notably, the one in Holbrook grove north of Redway. No houses near, or above it for miles. Plastic… I hope their liver doesn’t die, and I hope their plastic bottle doesn’t float in the ocean for and eternity, or kill fish.

            Yeah, they will probably pay for “boutique”.

  • In my opinion, legalization is coming–whether next year or next decade is up for debate but it is coming. The North Coast needs to do all it can to make this place a dream vacation place for someone from Alabama or Paris

    Yes, at this point, big Agribusiness will probably co opt growing and move much of it to other areas. BUT the Humboldt name is big (I am always hearing anecdotes about locals traveling in Europe being asked about marijuana when people find out where they are from.), the climate appears to be ideal as the Emerald Triangle News suggests, and marijuana’s need for sexing enhances the feasibility for what ///M3 called “small scale organic grows.” Furthermore, Daryl Cherny’s idea to create a dispensary at the Garberville Hospital could further put Humboldt in the forefront of Marijuana life. Would the North Coast have as much money as it does now? That is less likely but we can cushion the crash.

  • In my opinion, legalization is coming–whether next year or next decade is up for debate but it is coming. The North Coast needs to do all it can to make this place a dream vacation place for someone from Alabama or Paris

    Yes, at this point, big Agribusiness will probably co opt growing and move much of it to other areas. BUT the Humboldt name is big (I am always hearing anecdotes about locals traveling in Europe being asked about marijuana when people find out where they are from.), the climate appears to be ideal as the Emerald Triangle News suggests, and marijuana’s need for sexing enhances the feasibility for what ///M3 called “small scale organic grows.” Furthermore, Daryl Cherny’s idea to create a dispensary at the Garberville Hospital could further put Humboldt in the forefront of Marijuana life. Would the North Coast have as much money as it does now? That is less likely but we can cushion the crash.

  • Fiance here:

    What I do know is that if you people want a marijuana based tourist trade you need to do something about the quality of accomodations up there. On the many trips we have had to take there for court, we have never found a hotel that was the least bit friendly. There is always a problem, the worst being trying to find a hotel that actually turns on the heaters. I have frozen my rear end off every time we stay there, I have had rooms that we booked months in advance given away to others then when the hotel tried to put us in a room that we didn’t want they tried to charge us for it anyway. It took about 5 hours after we got there (after a 16 hour drive) to get it sorted out and find another room. Every trip has been like that. We finally started having to stay in Willets to get a decent room for a decent price!

    The only friendly person I’ve encountered was a girl in one of the nurserys. Everyone else is most always rude (except the people in the Dennys) and its always a miserable trip for us.

    As far as getting ready for commercial grows, most of the people I know are starting to grow their own, no one can afford or wants to pay the high prices for what you all grow, especially when they can get the same stuff growing right in their own backyards. Its not all that hard to get to Oaksterdam and get clones to start your own grows now that more and more states are legalizing for medical use.

    I’d suggest trying to find a new way to make a living and starting to save as much money as you can now while you still have a market!

    • Eagle House Inn is pretty tight. Carter House is also sick, but it will cost you. Best Western Bayshore is alright depending on what room you get.

      The rest of the hotels are dives. Seriously, I have nothing good to say about them. Pure suck.

      Trinidad has all the good spots. What you really want to do is get a spot in Trinidad and commute to handle business. Then you can sit in a hot tub outside listening to seals instead of listening to tweakers argue over a quarter in the alley.

  • Fiance here:

    What I do know is that if you people want a marijuana based tourist trade you need to do something about the quality of accomodations up there. On the many trips we have had to take there for court, we have never found a hotel that was the least bit friendly. There is always a problem, the worst being trying to find a hotel that actually turns on the heaters. I have frozen my rear end off every time we stay there, I have had rooms that we booked months in advance given away to others then when the hotel tried to put us in a room that we didn’t want they tried to charge us for it anyway. It took about 5 hours after we got there (after a 16 hour drive) to get it sorted out and find another room. Every trip has been like that. We finally started having to stay in Willets to get a decent room for a decent price!

    The only friendly person I’ve encountered was a girl in one of the nurserys. Everyone else is most always rude (except the people in the Dennys) and its always a miserable trip for us.

    As far as getting ready for commercial grows, most of the people I know are starting to grow their own, no one can afford or wants to pay the high prices for what you all grow, especially when they can get the same stuff growing right in their own backyards. Its not all that hard to get to Oaksterdam and get clones to start your own grows now that more and more states are legalizing for medical use.

    I’d suggest trying to find a new way to make a living and starting to save as much money as you can now while you still have a market!

    • Eagle House Inn is pretty tight. Carter House is also sick, but it will cost you. Best Western Bayshore is alright depending on what room you get.

      The rest of the hotels are dives. Seriously, I have nothing good to say about them. Pure suck.

      Trinidad has all the good spots. What you really want to do is get a spot in Trinidad and commute to handle business. Then you can sit in a hot tub outside listening to seals instead of listening to tweakers argue over a quarter in the alley.

  • Fiance,

    I’m sorry your visits here have been unpleasant. Usually people rave about how nice people are. If you aren’t happy with the Garberville motels, have you tried staying in the Miranda Gardens Resort? The rooms are gorgeous, the people extremely nice, however, it isn’t inexpensive but for what you get the prices seem reasonable.

    I’m going to recap what I said to Ernie.

    I agree that anyone who can grow a tomato plant can grow a marijuana plant but, there are less and less people able to do that. Organic heirloom tomatoes are absolutely delicious so why does anyone buy those wet cardboardy things usually for sale in grocery stores…They do it because they don’t have land, they have never grown, and because they don’t know any different. I’ve read and been told how when people from other areas taste the fine local cannabis, they are astounded. That is because they haven’t had access to good stuff. The North Coast growers need to make sure that smokers elsewhere are aware of the differences between great, good, mediocre and bad weed.

    In fact CNC just did a nice little piece about this here http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/2010/01/wine-dope-cnbc-critics-and-my-30-seconds-of-fame.html
    The blog that the video is on rates wine and has been discussing (the author was quoted in the video) rating marijuana.

    • Fiance again…we’ve never stayed in the Garberville Motels…its was always Eureka, where we have our hearings. We don’t stay in Garberville for another reason which I don’t want to go into in this forum. Maybe next time we’ll try Miranda!

      • Hmm, for obvious reasons, I haven’t stayed much in Eureka Motels. We did stay in the motel at the corner of Broadway and fifth once and it was quite nice and the people were very helpful (and they had a free limo service in case you wanted to paint the town a bit.

  • Fiance,

    I’m sorry your visits here have been unpleasant. Usually people rave about how nice people are. If you aren’t happy with the Garberville motels, have you tried staying in the Miranda Gardens Resort? The rooms are gorgeous, the people extremely nice, however, it isn’t inexpensive but for what you get the prices seem reasonable.

    I’m going to recap what I said to Ernie.

    I agree that anyone who can grow a tomato plant can grow a marijuana plant but, there are less and less people able to do that. Organic heirloom tomatoes are absolutely delicious so why does anyone buy those wet cardboardy things usually for sale in grocery stores…They do it because they don’t have land, they have never grown, and because they don’t know any different. I’ve read and been told how when people from other areas taste the fine local cannabis, they are astounded. That is because they haven’t had access to good stuff. The North Coast growers need to make sure that smokers elsewhere are aware of the differences between great, good, mediocre and bad weed.

    In fact CNC just did a nice little piece about this here http://fermentation.typepad.com/fermentation/2010/01/wine-dope-cnbc-critics-and-my-30-seconds-of-fame.html
    The blog that the video is on rates wine and has been discussing (the author was quoted in the video) rating marijuana.

    • Fiance again…we’ve never stayed in the Garberville Motels…its was always Eureka, where we have our hearings. We don’t stay in Garberville for another reason which I don’t want to go into in this forum. Maybe next time we’ll try Miranda!

      • Hmm, for obvious reasons, I haven’t stayed much in Eureka Motels. We did stay in the motel at the corner of Broadway and fifth once and it was quite nice and the people were very helpful (and they had a free limo service in case you wanted to paint the town a bit.

  • Ernie, I’m naming my new strain “The Cream Of the South Fork Crick” in your honor! You’re officially hired as my marketing executive.

    Kym, I hear you, as my family also contains devotees to the Arcane Art of Corn Squeezins, but I maintain that there’s a difference, which is most of our older family members lacked the resources to turn it into a business when legalization came around. Plus as Ernie mentioned, ‘shine was always a starvation economy. This isn’t so much the case now, as most of us have a great deal more education and expendable income. In addition, moonshiners were in general not organized nor did they recognize themselves as a group. On the contrary, what I will term the “marijuana community” is much more concious of themselves as a group and subculture and are more likely to recognize the national and international fame (or infamy, if you like) of the Humboldt name.

    Fiance brings up what I see as the real barrier, which is the general lack of customer service in the area. Since I live in Eureka, I can’t speak for the whole county, but rudeness and general apathy is the order of the day around here. The accomodations are overpriced and often poor quality as well. The commercial strip of Eureka has all of the curb appeal of a flea market. There’s no question that there’s work to do there also. But as to your claims that everyone is growing their own, I disagree. For example, my friend who lives in a 300 square foot studio apartment in San Francisco would probably like to have a few plants, but it would mean putting the fridge in the hall. Plus she likes to get out of the city once and a while. Bang. There’s my market.

  • Ernie, I’m naming my new strain “The Cream Of the South Fork Crick” in your honor! You’re officially hired as my marketing executive.

    Kym, I hear you, as my family also contains devotees to the Arcane Art of Corn Squeezins, but I maintain that there’s a difference, which is most of our older family members lacked the resources to turn it into a business when legalization came around. Plus as Ernie mentioned, ‘shine was always a starvation economy. This isn’t so much the case now, as most of us have a great deal more education and expendable income. In addition, moonshiners were in general not organized nor did they recognize themselves as a group. On the contrary, what I will term the “marijuana community” is much more concious of themselves as a group and subculture and are more likely to recognize the national and international fame (or infamy, if you like) of the Humboldt name.

    Fiance brings up what I see as the real barrier, which is the general lack of customer service in the area. Since I live in Eureka, I can’t speak for the whole county, but rudeness and general apathy is the order of the day around here. The accomodations are overpriced and often poor quality as well. The commercial strip of Eureka has all of the curb appeal of a flea market. There’s no question that there’s work to do there also. But as to your claims that everyone is growing their own, I disagree. For example, my friend who lives in a 300 square foot studio apartment in San Francisco would probably like to have a few plants, but it would mean putting the fridge in the hall. Plus she likes to get out of the city once and a while. Bang. There’s my market.

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