Otter in Water

otter4

Otter in Water

Frequent Photo

There are 13 different species of otter. Ours, here in Humboldt County, are called the North American River Otter, Lontra canadensis.

This one had just surfaced and the water was pouring off him as he swam.

See other otter photos here and here.

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33 comments

  • Did you know that everyyear some river otters go overland from Salmon Creek up to our bass pond? Apparently the fishing is pretty good.

  • Many years ago, we woke up one morning to find 13 otters splashing in our small pond. They were feeding on bass and blue gills.

    It would have been a bit of a trek but the only place they could have come from was Salmon Creek. We never saw them again. Of course, they pretty well cleaned out the bass and blue gill that morning – no more reason to travel when the restaurant was closed.

  • Many years ago, we woke up one morning to find 13 otters splashing in our small pond. They were feeding on bass and blue gills.

    It would have been a bit of a trek but the only place they could have come from was Salmon Creek. We never saw them again. Of course, they pretty well cleaned out the bass and blue gill that morning – no more reason to travel when the restaurant was closed.

  • Well- I think these hippie-like otters just live on our welfare all day
    and dont have reul jobs!
    I hear they dont get married in Church either!
    Socializts i tell ya!

  • Well- I think these hippie-like otters just live on our welfare all day
    and dont have reul jobs!
    I hear they dont get married in Church either!
    Socializts i tell ya!

  • Mal Coombs had a pond up on Reed mountain, up Fish Creek at Benbow. He kept the pond fully stocked with well fed trout. Until… Darn, you guessed it, the otters got them.

    Dr. Gerry phelps had an old swimming pool that he had converted to a Koi Pond, you guessed it again.

    When the Rotary Club was raising Steelhead trout along the river bar… Yep! You guessed it!.

    But, they sure are cute arn’t they???

  • Mal Coombs had a pond up on Reed mountain, up Fish Creek at Benbow. He kept the pond fully stocked with well fed trout. Until… Darn, you guessed it, the otters got them.

    Dr. Gerry phelps had an old swimming pool that he had converted to a Koi Pond, you guessed it again.

    When the Rotary Club was raising Steelhead trout along the river bar… Yep! You guessed it!.

    But, they sure are cute arn’t they???

  • Wow, Kym, your otter shots (in the wild) sure beats the shots of Bucky Beaver that I got through the glass at NW Trek. Otters are so dang cute.

  • Wow, Kym, your otter shots (in the wild) sure beats the shots of Bucky Beaver that I got through the glass at NW Trek. Otters are so dang cute.

  • Great pic. Saw one in Stone Lagoon the other day. Didn’t get that close and my pic is not nearly as good. Thanks.

  • Great pic. Saw one in Stone Lagoon the other day. Didn’t get that close and my pic is not nearly as good. Thanks.

  • I never could figure out what they were eating but one or the other caught something every few minutes. They probably wiped out that spot.

  • I never could figure out what they were eating but one or the other caught something every few minutes. They probably wiped out that spot.

  • I love the way the water flows around them in your pictures, Kym. Otters move as if they’re part liquid. On our field trip to the Burlington visitor’s center recently, we got to pet an otter skin on display and their fur is amazingly sleek. Ernie, do you know if they were ever trapped extensively (for sale of fur, not as retribution for fish thievery! Koi ponds should have guard dogs out here.)?

  • I love the way the water flows around them in your pictures, Kym. Otters move as if they’re part liquid. On our field trip to the Burlington visitor’s center recently, we got to pet an otter skin on display and their fur is amazingly sleek. Ernie, do you know if they were ever trapped extensively (for sale of fur, not as retribution for fish thievery! Koi ponds should have guard dogs out here.)?

  • I like your clever title, Kym.

    Mjean, I’m amazed that otters were in your pond! I never thought of otters being around your place.

  • I like your clever title, Kym.

    Mjean, I’m amazed that otters were in your pond! I never thought of otters being around your place.

  • I’m loving this series of photos. We don’t have otters in the wild here in Oz.

    I’m doing a series of Peregrine Falcons this week but otters are cuter 🙂

  • I’m loving this series of photos. We don’t have otters in the wild here in Oz.

    I’m doing a series of Peregrine Falcons this week but otters are cuter 🙂

  • Do otters bark?

  • Do otters bark?

  • i love the wave behind him (or her 🙂

  • i love the wave behind him (or her 🙂

  • I so love the otter river photos.

  • I so love the otter river photos.

  • Some years back a trek to the backside of the Benbow Dam for a swim was my exercise and spa program. After they would install the dam, it would take a few weeks to get the leaks plugged and there would be muscle pounding “jacuzzi ‘jets of varying temperature and a current of frothy bubbles to ride across the face of the eroding concrete wall. For those who understand energy, rapids and falls are natural sources of extra oxygen and negative ions.

    I cannot count the times I got to share the pool with otters. Park divers reported curious otters approaching them as they would work underwater installing the dam on the lake side.

    My favorite encounter occurred when I hiked over the right side of the dam and saw a mother and three younguns playing in the pool below. I crept down the backside of the dam and took a perch above the fishladder on that side. I got to watch a lot of silly, uncoordinated play. To my delight, the adult otters led the pups up the ladder to a spot only three feet directly below me. One of the pups was weaker than the other two who could make the “jumps” over the concrete segments of the ladder. The mother twice reached back and grabbed the little one by the neck and dragged him up into the water of the next “step” of the ladder. I never saw the adult see me, but in a flash she sensed me and whirled down the ladder followed by two of the pups. The little one surfaced and looked around in panic, noticed me as I moved backwards to hide my prescence, and swam/tumbled down the ladder and into the pool. I winced, but quickly saw all four swimming and playing in the pool. After another five or ten minutes of otter watching, I saw them head downriver, and I got my swimming in.

    Some years back there was a fishery on Sprowel Creek that got ravaged by the otter population. In the 90’s I read a newspaper article about how few river otters there were in the state and I thought they must not know about the S. Fork of the Eel. Living in Piercy on the river, otters were a regular occurance . I bet the stretch of the S. Fork south of Piercy where the Eel leaves civilizations has a large otter population.

    Their undulating swimplay is even more fun to watch than bellydancing, .. barely.

  • Some years back a trek to the backside of the Benbow Dam for a swim was my exercise and spa program. After they would install the dam, it would take a few weeks to get the leaks plugged and there would be muscle pounding “jacuzzi ‘jets of varying temperature and a current of frothy bubbles to ride across the face of the eroding concrete wall. For those who understand energy, rapids and falls are natural sources of extra oxygen and negative ions.

    I cannot count the times I got to share the pool with otters. Park divers reported curious otters approaching them as they would work underwater installing the dam on the lake side.

    My favorite encounter occurred when I hiked over the right side of the dam and saw a mother and three younguns playing in the pool below. I crept down the backside of the dam and took a perch above the fishladder on that side. I got to watch a lot of silly, uncoordinated play. To my delight, the adult otters led the pups up the ladder to a spot only three feet directly below me. One of the pups was weaker than the other two who could make the “jumps” over the concrete segments of the ladder. The mother twice reached back and grabbed the little one by the neck and dragged him up into the water of the next “step” of the ladder. I never saw the adult see me, but in a flash she sensed me and whirled down the ladder followed by two of the pups. The little one surfaced and looked around in panic, noticed me as I moved backwards to hide my prescence, and swam/tumbled down the ladder and into the pool. I winced, but quickly saw all four swimming and playing in the pool. After another five or ten minutes of otter watching, I saw them head downriver, and I got my swimming in.

    Some years back there was a fishery on Sprowel Creek that got ravaged by the otter population. In the 90’s I read a newspaper article about how few river otters there were in the state and I thought they must not know about the S. Fork of the Eel. Living in Piercy on the river, otters were a regular occurance . I bet the stretch of the S. Fork south of Piercy where the Eel leaves civilizations has a large otter population.

    Their undulating swimplay is even more fun to watch than bellydancing, .. barely.

  • I read this with so much pleasure. Thank you.

  • I read this with so much pleasure. Thank you.

  • Such a lovely pic, and some awesome comments. It is always a pleasure to be back at your blog, Kym.

  • Such a lovely pic, and some awesome comments. It is always a pleasure to be back at your blog, Kym.

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