Legalizing Marijuana: Its not Black and White in Humboldt

Humboldt bay

Humboldt Bay in Black and White

Frequent Photo

Few things in Humboldt are Black and White.

Many are involved in the marijuana business here in Humboldt but how many are for Legalization which could come at great economic cost?

Orange County Register (notable for its conservative albeit liberatarian leanings) just did a poll which showed an overwhelming 83%  favor legalization. (Hattip to Highboltage)  I wonder how many in Humboldt feel the same.

[polldaddy poll=2112783]

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87 comments

  • Lovely photo. Wow. I just sit here enjoying it while the rain drops dance off the roof.

  • Lovely photo. Wow. I just sit here enjoying it while the rain drops dance off the roof.

  • Nothing in life is just black and white anymore.

    The exception is beautiful photos like you took here – stripping away all pretenses and focusing on form.

    If Humboldt County doesn’t exceed 83 percent approval I’d be shocked.
    Isn’t a poll for marijuana legalization here in Humboldt like shooting fish in a barrel – providing you pick the right barrel?

  • Nothing in life is just black and white anymore.

    The exception is beautiful photos like you took here – stripping away all pretenses and focusing on form.

    If Humboldt County doesn’t exceed 83 percent approval I’d be shocked.
    Isn’t a poll for marijuana legalization here in Humboldt like shooting fish in a barrel – providing you pick the right barrel?

  • Dave, You’d think so but currently, the poll is 50/50. There are a lot of mixed feelings about the possible financial repercussions. Of course, my sampling is small.

  • Dave, You’d think so but currently, the poll is 50/50. There are a lot of mixed feelings about the possible financial repercussions. Of course, my sampling is small.

  • Gorgeous photo, Kym. I wish my opinion on your question/poll could be that clear. I believe that marijuana is much less socially destructive, ironically, than LEGAL alcohol, and think it should be legalized.

    Yet I fear the local economic impact of such a drastic change in the “industry”…

    • Me, too. Though I think if we Humboltians tried to ride the wave and focus on ways to make money off Marijuana tourism, we might survive.

  • Gorgeous photo, Kym. I wish my opinion on your question/poll could be that clear. I believe that marijuana is much less socially destructive, ironically, than LEGAL alcohol, and think it should be legalized.

    Yet I fear the local economic impact of such a drastic change in the “industry”…

    • Me, too. Though I think if we Humboltians tried to ride the wave and focus on ways to make money off Marijuana tourism, we might survive.

  • “much less socially destructive” – Unbelievable!

    30 to 40 years of a criminal generation raised and bred by the growers and the local businesses exploiting all that tax-free money and that’s NOT socially destructive? I suppose you think corruption just crawls out from under a rock from time to time.

    My heart bleeds for all that legal lost revenue . . .

    • Are you saying that tax-free money itself is socially destructive? Could you clarify this reasoning with a reference?

    • I should clarify my own request. I think that the particular brand of untaxed money associated with illegal commerce causes corruption. I am not sure what taxes have to do with it specifically. Many forms of income are untaxed. Bulk herb sales are generally free of sales tax. What makes cannabis different in that taxes would end corruption? In the case of cigarettes, high taxes encourage corruption.

      • Actually, I hadn’t even gotten to the tax implications of legalization and I apologize for my oversymplification of the issue.

        I just meant that as a substance, marijuana seems (and I know I’m hedging with “seems”) less destructive on a personal level. I worked at a treatment center doing intakes and while I saw folks who were addicted to marijuana, none of them had caused the harm under the influence than alcoholics had. Violence, personal angst and the destruction of families was more the norm than not with alcohol abuse. Not so with marijuana–not that those addictions didn’t also come with problems…

  • “much less socially destructive” – Unbelievable!

    30 to 40 years of a criminal generation raised and bred by the growers and the local businesses exploiting all that tax-free money and that’s NOT socially destructive? I suppose you think corruption just crawls out from under a rock from time to time.

    My heart bleeds for all that legal lost revenue . . .

    • Are you saying that tax-free money itself is socially destructive? Could you clarify this reasoning with a reference?

    • I should clarify my own request. I think that the particular brand of untaxed money associated with illegal commerce causes corruption. I am not sure what taxes have to do with it specifically. Many forms of income are untaxed. Bulk herb sales are generally free of sales tax. What makes cannabis different in that taxes would end corruption? In the case of cigarettes, high taxes encourage corruption.

      • Actually, I hadn’t even gotten to the tax implications of legalization and I apologize for my oversymplification of the issue.

        I just meant that as a substance, marijuana seems (and I know I’m hedging with “seems”) less destructive on a personal level. I worked at a treatment center doing intakes and while I saw folks who were addicted to marijuana, none of them had caused the harm under the influence than alcoholics had. Violence, personal angst and the destruction of families was more the norm than not with alcohol abuse. Not so with marijuana–not that those addictions didn’t also come with problems…

  • Let’s get one thing straight.

    The Humboldt County marijuana industry does NOT want to legalize marijuana.

    They want to legitimize the marijuana industry.

    From D.A. Gallegos to the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors — they have allowed dopers to grow 495 plants in a residential neighborhood.

    If they legalize marijuana that means rules and regulations.

    Dopers will never support structure.

  • Let’s get one thing straight.

    The Humboldt County marijuana industry does NOT want to legalize marijuana.

    They want to legitimize the marijuana industry.

    From D.A. Gallegos to the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors — they have allowed dopers to grow 495 plants in a residential neighborhood.

    If they legalize marijuana that means rules and regulations.

    Dopers will never support structure.

    • It doesn’t matter what this county wants, the issue is statewide.

      Nobody is going to take your opinion seriously if it sounds like you are angry. You might want to take a chill pill.

  • The east coast and mid west are weed starved regions of the country . even if prices drop by more than 1/2 growers can keep their yearly gross close to the sameas what they get now by increasing the size of their crop and picking up a few new buyers.All legalizing will do is cause the groweres to have to produce a lil more to keep making what they are now . But with no risk of arrest having a bigger grow is only a matter of a little more elbow grease and patience .I will take a lil more work over jail or prison any day.

  • The east coast and mid west are weed starved regions of the country . even if prices drop by more than 1/2 growers can keep their yearly gross close to the sameas what they get now by increasing the size of their crop and picking up a few new buyers.All legalizing will do is cause the groweres to have to produce a lil more to keep making what they are now . But with no risk of arrest having a bigger grow is only a matter of a little more elbow grease and patience .I will take a lil more work over jail or prison any day.

  • Y’all aren’t considering the little guy. Prohibition means job security for corner kids. How is a hustler gonna sport that sick new hat and matching throwback when a bunch of fools with business licenses are eating up all the profits? Don’t forget about the kids! Keeping these kids gainfully employed is the reason why we put up with prohibition. When we repeal prohibition, we won’t even need all these candy bar and magazine subscription schemes to prepare kids for juggling pot.

    Next time you cop a sack from some young blood sporting hella clean Air Force Ones, remember where he got the ducats to pay for that mess: prohibition. Without prohibition, all the hustlers will have to move on to something weak like getting a job.

    • I dont see a whole lotta people feeling bad about middle men in the weed buisness being squeezed out. no more than we will feel sorry for cops or prison guards that will have to get a real job or actually start catching criminal’s .Maybe next time my truck is broken into and all my tools get ripped off the cops will actually come out and at least fill out a report instead of telling me just contact your insurance company. but if you have crime to report involving drug use or a gun then you can call us back.We will come out if you report a person smoking a joint on the front porch of his house but we dont have time to mess with some one who just had a few grand in power tools swiped from their vehicle and now has no way to make a living till the insurance company cuts a check to replace them.

  • Y’all aren’t considering the little guy. Prohibition means job security for corner kids. How is a hustler gonna sport that sick new hat and matching throwback when a bunch of fools with business licenses are eating up all the profits? Don’t forget about the kids! Keeping these kids gainfully employed is the reason why we put up with prohibition. When we repeal prohibition, we won’t even need all these candy bar and magazine subscription schemes to prepare kids for juggling pot.

    Next time you cop a sack from some young blood sporting hella clean Air Force Ones, remember where he got the ducats to pay for that mess: prohibition. Without prohibition, all the hustlers will have to move on to something weak like getting a job.

    • I dont see a whole lotta people feeling bad about middle men in the weed buisness being squeezed out. no more than we will feel sorry for cops or prison guards that will have to get a real job or actually start catching criminal’s .Maybe next time my truck is broken into and all my tools get ripped off the cops will actually come out and at least fill out a report instead of telling me just contact your insurance company. but if you have crime to report involving drug use or a gun then you can call us back.We will come out if you report a person smoking a joint on the front porch of his house but we dont have time to mess with some one who just had a few grand in power tools swiped from their vehicle and now has no way to make a living till the insurance company cuts a check to replace them.

  • Umm…beautiful photo, Kym!!

  • Umm…beautiful photo, Kym!!

  • Pingback: Legalize Marijuana in California, Yes or No? « Eureka Democrat

  • Pingback: Legalize Marijuana in California, Yes or No? « Eureka Democrat

  • I would really like to hear some knowledgeable, well thought out scenarios regarding possible outcomes from the possible legalization of marijuana. I guess if it happens it will start in California. That means pot tourism, like in Amsterdam? What will happen to dispensaries? Won’t lots of people still want to just go purchase high quality weed at the corner store, like now? Why would prices drop so dramatically? I’m thinking it will always come back to supply and demand. Demand should definitely increase, from tourism and people who enjoy smoking but are afraid of getting caught while it’s illegal…
    supply could drop because all the drug cartel grows on public lands will disappear, wont they? Won’t that drastically reduce supply? Maybe I’m all wrong, but would really enjoy reading some different opinions.

    • Socially, cannabis use in ingrained in our society, especially in California society. I doubt that demand would increase significantly under a legalization scenario. The only regulations that exist now which prevent people from using cannabis who otherwise would use cannabis are drug-free workplace insurance rules.

      Due to the clogged court system, no law-abiding citizen in any region of the U.S. is scared of serving time due to small amounts of cannabis. Louisiana has especially tough laws, yet nobody I’ve met from Louisiana who has been busted for simple possession in Louisiana served any jail time. Although Louisiana courts could theoretically throw someone in jail for a first-time cannabis offense, judges often throw these cases out or punish offenders with the no drug test, no probation officer form of probation. The only people I’ve met from any state who served time for simple possession were either caught dealing and plead down to possession, were caught with an amount significantly larger than what is considered personal use, or had a rap sheet from committing other crimes.

      The lie perpetuated prior to the passage of Prop. 215 and to this day is that greater availability of cannabis would produce more cannabis users. I call this a lie because the amount of cannabis that runs through through cannabis collectives is dwarfed by the amount of cannabis sold on the black market. Another lie is that drugged driving would increase with the availability of medical cannabis. If this is true, where are all of these new drugged drivers and why haven’t our highways turned to total carnage in the last 13 years?

      Under legalization, prices would drop dramatically due to vertical integration. There are a few reasons why the current cannabis collectives charge a high price. The primary reason is that nobody would wholesale to a collective if they offered to pay a significantly lower price than black market buyers would pay. The other reason is certain drug-free fantasy organizations would cry foul if it were possible for a patient to obtain cannabis at a collective and sell it for a profit in the black market. This is all common knowledge in the industry. Collectives would charge a much lower price if they thought they could as lower prices would result in more customers.

      Cartel grows on public lands are not a major source of consumer-grade cannabis in California. The product grown in remote, high elevation, 10,000+ plant, multiple football field-sized grows by a handful of migrant laborers is inferior to the domestic product grown by locals. The relatively low-quality cartel cannabis is grown here and shipped off to other regions where high-quality cannabis is not available. The cartels have no reason to sell locally as they already dominate high-priced, low-supply markets that are out of reach to local producers.

      If you want a first-hand view of what legal, commercial cannabis cultivation would be like, visit Castroville’s artichoke fields. In Castroville, you can buy crates of artichokes for $0.20/lbs due to the magnitude of local production. I go there every harvest season for this purpose as I love artichokes. In Humboldt County, artichokes cost ten times as much. I would expect the price of cannabis to be very low in places like Humboldt County due to the same market factors that push down the price of artichokes in Castroville.

      Under legalization, there would be so-called “drug tourism” and tourism from herbal enthusiasts. Humboldt County would suffer under this scenario as it would be far more likely for people to travel to Mendocino, Sonoma, and Lake County for this purpose. Even so, there would be a boost in tourism in Humboldt County and the money brought in could offset the money lost from the elimination of our lucrative, export-driven economy.

      If anyone else has any different ideas of how this would play out, I would like to hear them. I do not think that any of the factors in play now would affect a legal cannabis market as much as raw agricultural dominance. By agricultural dominance, I am referring to our mild climate which provides Humboldt growers with much higher yields than those in latitudes to the north or south. The climate cannot be altered by any change in the law.

  • I would really like to hear some knowledgeable, well thought out scenarios regarding possible outcomes from the possible legalization of marijuana. I guess if it happens it will start in California. That means pot tourism, like in Amsterdam? What will happen to dispensaries? Won’t lots of people still want to just go purchase high quality weed at the corner store, like now? Why would prices drop so dramatically? I’m thinking it will always come back to supply and demand. Demand should definitely increase, from tourism and people who enjoy smoking but are afraid of getting caught while it’s illegal…
    supply could drop because all the drug cartel grows on public lands will disappear, wont they? Won’t that drastically reduce supply? Maybe I’m all wrong, but would really enjoy reading some different opinions.

    • Socially, cannabis use in ingrained in our society, especially in California society. I doubt that demand would increase significantly under a legalization scenario. The only regulations that exist now which prevent people from using cannabis who otherwise would use cannabis are drug-free workplace insurance rules.

      Due to the clogged court system, no law-abiding citizen in any region of the U.S. is scared of serving time due to small amounts of cannabis. Louisiana has especially tough laws, yet nobody I’ve met from Louisiana who has been busted for simple possession in Louisiana served any jail time. Although Louisiana courts could theoretically throw someone in jail for a first-time cannabis offense, judges often throw these cases out or punish offenders with the no drug test, no probation officer form of probation. The only people I’ve met from any state who served time for simple possession were either caught dealing and plead down to possession, were caught with an amount significantly larger than what is considered personal use, or had a rap sheet from committing other crimes.

      The lie perpetuated prior to the passage of Prop. 215 and to this day is that greater availability of cannabis would produce more cannabis users. I call this a lie because the amount of cannabis that runs through through cannabis collectives is dwarfed by the amount of cannabis sold on the black market. Another lie is that drugged driving would increase with the availability of medical cannabis. If this is true, where are all of these new drugged drivers and why haven’t our highways turned to total carnage in the last 13 years?

      Under legalization, prices would drop dramatically due to vertical integration. There are a few reasons why the current cannabis collectives charge a high price. The primary reason is that nobody would wholesale to a collective if they offered to pay a significantly lower price than black market buyers would pay. The other reason is certain drug-free fantasy organizations would cry foul if it were possible for a patient to obtain cannabis at a collective and sell it for a profit in the black market. This is all common knowledge in the industry. Collectives would charge a much lower price if they thought they could as lower prices would result in more customers.

      Cartel grows on public lands are not a major source of consumer-grade cannabis in California. The product grown in remote, high elevation, 10,000+ plant, multiple football field-sized grows by a handful of migrant laborers is inferior to the domestic product grown by locals. The relatively low-quality cartel cannabis is grown here and shipped off to other regions where high-quality cannabis is not available. The cartels have no reason to sell locally as they already dominate high-priced, low-supply markets that are out of reach to local producers.

      If you want a first-hand view of what legal, commercial cannabis cultivation would be like, visit Castroville’s artichoke fields. In Castroville, you can buy crates of artichokes for $0.20/lbs due to the magnitude of local production. I go there every harvest season for this purpose as I love artichokes. In Humboldt County, artichokes cost ten times as much. I would expect the price of cannabis to be very low in places like Humboldt County due to the same market factors that push down the price of artichokes in Castroville.

      Under legalization, there would be so-called “drug tourism” and tourism from herbal enthusiasts. Humboldt County would suffer under this scenario as it would be far more likely for people to travel to Mendocino, Sonoma, and Lake County for this purpose. Even so, there would be a boost in tourism in Humboldt County and the money brought in could offset the money lost from the elimination of our lucrative, export-driven economy.

      If anyone else has any different ideas of how this would play out, I would like to hear them. I do not think that any of the factors in play now would affect a legal cannabis market as much as raw agricultural dominance. By agricultural dominance, I am referring to our mild climate which provides Humboldt growers with much higher yields than those in latitudes to the north or south. The climate cannot be altered by any change in the law.

  • OK, sorry for responding to my own post, but I’ve been thinking more about this whole legalization issue and have a few more comments and a few more questions.
    I can’t imagine pot ever just being made legal, it ain’t gonna happen. Some states and maybe even the Fed will eventually regulate it like alcohol. That way they generate revenue and they can sell the whole idea to some of the non-smokers out there. I’m guessing that if I was a small grower I’d be concerned that big corporate growers would get into the business, fencing in 20 acre parcels complete with armed guards and barbed wire fences, flooding the market with good quality product.
    From the small growers viewpoint, I guess I’d consider teaming up with other small growers and starting a co-op, just like growers of other commodities do now. That way there would be strength in numbers and it would help solve some of the issues like distribution, regulation headaches, adjust to supply and demand changes, marketing, etc. They could promote their product as being “organic”, or “the very best quality”, or “grown in small, lovingly tended gardens”. They could develop a special “niche”. In addition to “wine-country” tours, there could be “weed-country” tours! But I’m not so sure all the locals would appreciate that.
    On the other hand, from the consumer’s point of view, demand will definitely increase. There is a lot of pent-up demand out there that isn’t being met because of pot’s illegal status, or scarcity of product, or the negative stigma attached to smoking which will erode gradually with increased acceptance that will develop as more people openly admit to smoking occasionally, once you can no longer be arrested or have your kids taken away. I don’t live in California, but if a store opened up down the street where I live where I could legally buy some great weed, I’d be the first in line. And I bet that would be a long line.
    Making it regulated would go a long way towards eliminating all the half-wits that spill 55 gallon drums of diesel fuel into streams and illegals trashing sections of our national parks, and help eliminate some of the criminal behavior that comes with illegal growing and distributing. If you wanted to grow weed and sell it you’d have to go buy a license, just like a plumber or electrician. You’d be subject to inspections to be sure you were following all the regulations, using the appropriate chemicals, using legal and safe lighting, paying your taxes. I’d be more than happy if I was a grower to pay my taxes and become legitimate, especially if those taxes were being used to eliminate illegal growers in the national parks and knuckle heads burning down houses with illegal wiring. It would weed out all the incompetents (no pun intended) and the best, smartest growers would flourish. If I was a grower, I’d be able to sleep better at night and take pride in what I was doing instead of always being nervous and hiding my activities. In the end, I think it would be good for the serious growers who want to operate legally and it would be good for the consumer and good for the rest of society. Eventually, the laws of supply and demand and the same principals of fair-trade and open competition that function in the growing and distribution of every other commodity in the world would take over. The smartest and most talented growers will still make great money, consumers will get high quality products grown safely and buy it legally and the taxes generated by it all can help protect all of us.

  • OK, sorry for responding to my own post, but I’ve been thinking more about this whole legalization issue and have a few more comments and a few more questions.
    I can’t imagine pot ever just being made legal, it ain’t gonna happen. Some states and maybe even the Fed will eventually regulate it like alcohol. That way they generate revenue and they can sell the whole idea to some of the non-smokers out there. I’m guessing that if I was a small grower I’d be concerned that big corporate growers would get into the business, fencing in 20 acre parcels complete with armed guards and barbed wire fences, flooding the market with good quality product.
    From the small growers viewpoint, I guess I’d consider teaming up with other small growers and starting a co-op, just like growers of other commodities do now. That way there would be strength in numbers and it would help solve some of the issues like distribution, regulation headaches, adjust to supply and demand changes, marketing, etc. They could promote their product as being “organic”, or “the very best quality”, or “grown in small, lovingly tended gardens”. They could develop a special “niche”. In addition to “wine-country” tours, there could be “weed-country” tours! But I’m not so sure all the locals would appreciate that.
    On the other hand, from the consumer’s point of view, demand will definitely increase. There is a lot of pent-up demand out there that isn’t being met because of pot’s illegal status, or scarcity of product, or the negative stigma attached to smoking which will erode gradually with increased acceptance that will develop as more people openly admit to smoking occasionally, once you can no longer be arrested or have your kids taken away. I don’t live in California, but if a store opened up down the street where I live where I could legally buy some great weed, I’d be the first in line. And I bet that would be a long line.
    Making it regulated would go a long way towards eliminating all the half-wits that spill 55 gallon drums of diesel fuel into streams and illegals trashing sections of our national parks, and help eliminate some of the criminal behavior that comes with illegal growing and distributing. If you wanted to grow weed and sell it you’d have to go buy a license, just like a plumber or electrician. You’d be subject to inspections to be sure you were following all the regulations, using the appropriate chemicals, using legal and safe lighting, paying your taxes. I’d be more than happy if I was a grower to pay my taxes and become legitimate, especially if those taxes were being used to eliminate illegal growers in the national parks and knuckle heads burning down houses with illegal wiring. It would weed out all the incompetents (no pun intended) and the best, smartest growers would flourish. If I was a grower, I’d be able to sleep better at night and take pride in what I was doing instead of always being nervous and hiding my activities. In the end, I think it would be good for the serious growers who want to operate legally and it would be good for the consumer and good for the rest of society. Eventually, the laws of supply and demand and the same principals of fair-trade and open competition that function in the growing and distribution of every other commodity in the world would take over. The smartest and most talented growers will still make great money, consumers will get high quality products grown safely and buy it legally and the taxes generated by it all can help protect all of us.

  • I’d be more than happy if I was a grower to pay my taxes and become legitimate, especially if those taxes were being used to eliminate illegal growers in the national parks and knuckle heads burning down houses with illegal wiring. It would weed out all the incompetents (no pun intended) and the best, smartest growers would flourish.

    Simple competition would weed out the incompetent farmers. As it is, most people with the agricultural know-how to produce vast quantities of high-quality crops are not in the cannabis business. The comparison to tobacco farming is useful. Although tobacco is an extremely lucrative cash crop, have you ever heard of incompetent farmers in the tobacco business? It is not any type of government regulation that keeps incompetent farmers out of the tobacco business, it is their own incompetence. If the profits were lower, only those able to turn a profit would bother. The cost of running 1000 watt lights in a $2,000/month rental home would prevent the incompetent farmers from turning a profit.

  • I’d be more than happy if I was a grower to pay my taxes and become legitimate, especially if those taxes were being used to eliminate illegal growers in the national parks and knuckle heads burning down houses with illegal wiring. It would weed out all the incompetents (no pun intended) and the best, smartest growers would flourish.

    Simple competition would weed out the incompetent farmers. As it is, most people with the agricultural know-how to produce vast quantities of high-quality crops are not in the cannabis business. The comparison to tobacco farming is useful. Although tobacco is an extremely lucrative cash crop, have you ever heard of incompetent farmers in the tobacco business? It is not any type of government regulation that keeps incompetent farmers out of the tobacco business, it is their own incompetence. If the profits were lower, only those able to turn a profit would bother. The cost of running 1000 watt lights in a $2,000/month rental home would prevent the incompetent farmers from turning a profit.

  • I think pot will go for cheaper prices if legalized. Farmers would then tend to grow more to balance that out. (Environmental problems–water use etc–need to be addressed then.)

    I am curious if big corporate grows would be able to maintain high quality pot. People tell me that when they go to other states with Humboldt weed that the buyers are blown away by the quality. Sensimilla wou;d be difficult to obtain in large grows–though not impossible I understand. Small grows with high quality product would be still profitable I think.

    Also products such as salves, foods, drinks made with marijuana (including the buzz inducing THC) could be sold also. Historical tourism of the marijuana industry in Humboldt might sell ie here is where a grow house once stood, here is where arrests were made.

  • I think pot will go for cheaper prices if legalized. Farmers would then tend to grow more to balance that out. (Environmental problems–water use etc–need to be addressed then.)

    I am curious if big corporate grows would be able to maintain high quality pot. People tell me that when they go to other states with Humboldt weed that the buyers are blown away by the quality. Sensimilla wou;d be difficult to obtain in large grows–though not impossible I understand. Small grows with high quality product would be still profitable I think.

    Also products such as salves, foods, drinks made with marijuana (including the buzz inducing THC) could be sold also. Historical tourism of the marijuana industry in Humboldt might sell ie here is where a grow house once stood, here is where arrests were made.

  • Exactly. There is some experimentation being done with medicinal uses, too. Those could be marketed with some sort of medical model. Combine the Redwoods tourism with Marijuana history and fine buds tourism as well as some sort of marijuana spa and I think we could pull in some decent money if marijuana is legalized. The question might be though would the same people making money now be the people making money then?

  • Exactly. There is some experimentation being done with medicinal uses, too. Those could be marketed with some sort of medical model. Combine the Redwoods tourism with Marijuana history and fine buds tourism as well as some sort of marijuana spa and I think we could pull in some decent money if marijuana is legalized. The question might be though would the same people making money now be the people making money then?

  • we cannot legalize marijuana because we won’t have a way of dealing with abandoned cars. When there is an abandoned car on our road even though law-enforcement is called repeatedly nothing happens. Then some neighbor puts a bag of shake in the car and calls the cops and says it’s a car with marrijuana in it and the car will be gone within hours.

    • So it was you who narced on my bucket. It’s not like I took it to Tully Creek. That car almost ran. Yea it was unregistered. Yea it had a couple a leaks in the carburetor, alternator, and the transmission. The heater just happened to blow in your neighborhood. I drained all the fluids out before I cut. I was eventually gonna come get my Cadillac. My Pontiac, I mean.

  • we cannot legalize marijuana because we won’t have a way of dealing with abandoned cars. When there is an abandoned car on our road even though law-enforcement is called repeatedly nothing happens. Then some neighbor puts a bag of shake in the car and calls the cops and says it’s a car with marrijuana in it and the car will be gone within hours.

    • So it was you who narced on my bucket. It’s not like I took it to Tully Creek. That car almost ran. Yea it was unregistered. Yea it had a couple a leaks in the carburetor, alternator, and the transmission. The heater just happened to blow in your neighborhood. I drained all the fluids out before I cut. I was eventually gonna come get my Cadillac. My Pontiac, I mean.

  • The Tully Creek photo….WOW! That is a disaster.

    • There are a bunch more cleanups going down right now.

      Look on humboldt craigslist for “hazwop”

      I’ve been surprised that this ain’t in the newspapers. Cleanup is in full effect.

      • I looked up at hazwop and couldn’t find a thing…Help?

        • Too late. Craigslist posts typically have expiration dates. Job offers typically drop off at 5pm.

          There have been jobs for hazwop certified folks all summer and fall. If I am not mistaken, Oct. 15 or 16 begins a one week deadline to finish or shutdown all ongoing cleanups.

          There will be more next year.

  • The Tully Creek photo….WOW! That is a disaster.

    • There are a bunch more cleanups going down right now.

      Look on humboldt craigslist for “hazwop”

      I’ve been surprised that this ain’t in the newspapers. Cleanup is in full effect.

      • I looked up at hazwop and couldn’t find a thing…Help?

        • Too late. Craigslist posts typically have expiration dates. Job offers typically drop off at 5pm.

          There have been jobs for hazwop certified folks all summer and fall. If I am not mistaken, Oct. 15 or 16 begins a one week deadline to finish or shutdown all ongoing cleanups.

          There will be more next year.

  • OK, so today the Obama administration announced it will not prosecute medical mj users or legal dispensaries in states where it’s legal. So, I imagine the number of dispensaries will grow, as the degree of concern regarding federal law enforcement vanishes. States, like California, simply don’t have the economic resources right now to effectively monitor and enforce the “out of control” mj use, especially in CA…so this might be the beginning of the end when it comes to the war against mj at least in CA. And I for one say, IT”S ABOUT F***ING TIME! Stop wasting precious government resources trying to stop people from smoking weed, it ain’t gonna happen.
    I’m beginning to realize that nobody really knows exactly what direction this whole legalization thing will take, how long it will take or what effect it will have on the california cannabis industry. My opinion is, growers need to become legitimate, become regulated, and continue to grow the best weed they know how. Smart, talented, legal growers will prosper, just as breweries, wineries and distilleries have done since prohibition ended so many years ago. There is an insatiable demand for good weed. The emerald triangle will always have the reputation of connoisseur quality mj, like Kona, Hawaii or Blue Mountain, Jamaica has for it’s coffee. Hopefully, regulation and legalization will slowly weed out the knuckleheads, massive illegal grows and criminal bullshit element of mj growing and use. I’m guessing that MJ is going to become a legitimate enterprise with strict regulation and enforcement of those operating outside the law. What other conceivable outcome is possible?
    What does someone need to do to open a “not for profit” dispensary? It seems like everybody should open one, pay themselves and their friends nice salaries, and go non-profit! You can still make a nice living as a salaried employee of a non profit business…health insurance for the family, auto allowance, bonuses, expense account…lot’s of perks, not the least of which would be legitimacy and being a law abiding citizen. Will you get rich? Probably not. Will you get arrested? No, if you obey the law. Obviously, there will be plenty of growers that still wanna become rich, quickly. Certain quiet, clandestine, well run operations, albeit illegal, will continue for years. In any event, everybody’s product will need to be of excellent quality, with a certain “state stamp” or other such state ID. The problem for illegal growers will be that there will be an unavoidable shrinking of their available markets without the “stamp”, just like during prohibition of alcohol. Before long, it will become pointless to grow or try to sell mj without the stamp. If you get the stamp, you can sell. If you buy at an outlet, with the stamp, you’re legal. If you sell mj without the stamp, you’re in violation of the law. If you buy weed from someone, without the stamp, you’re breaking the law. I’m guessing it will go something like that. As long as the quality is excellent, a variety exists to pick from, the price is comparable or a bit less than the black market, you can’t be arrested, and you have the convenience of stopping by your local dispensary like stopping at a 7-11, I’m pretty confident lots more people will be showing up for their medicine.

    • I love this whole discussion on legalizing pot.I’m new to this site so pardon any ignorance.I’m from a
      state that sells alcohol at stores and drive thrus and such and also state run liquor stores. This is my idea, make pot legal have the states run this. The state liquor stores use the proceeds from their sales to help with state taxes like schools road projects and highways libraries and other state funded stuff. The same liquor stores could sell state grown and cultivated weed and use the profits to pay for books and schools and highways and state hospitals. Also could you imagine Marlboro buds or camel or winston with a state tax sticker on it. These corps can easily convert tobacco factories to weed. And sorry growers but let’s make growing on your own illeagal. At least at first. Then maybe micro breweries or something. Let all the proceeds go to individual states. This type of thnking can feed poor families at food banks run by the state because of proceeds of corporate or government run growing. How’s that.

  • OK, so today the Obama administration announced it will not prosecute medical mj users or legal dispensaries in states where it’s legal. So, I imagine the number of dispensaries will grow, as the degree of concern regarding federal law enforcement vanishes. States, like California, simply don’t have the economic resources right now to effectively monitor and enforce the “out of control” mj use, especially in CA…so this might be the beginning of the end when it comes to the war against mj at least in CA. And I for one say, IT”S ABOUT F***ING TIME! Stop wasting precious government resources trying to stop people from smoking weed, it ain’t gonna happen.
    I’m beginning to realize that nobody really knows exactly what direction this whole legalization thing will take, how long it will take or what effect it will have on the california cannabis industry. My opinion is, growers need to become legitimate, become regulated, and continue to grow the best weed they know how. Smart, talented, legal growers will prosper, just as breweries, wineries and distilleries have done since prohibition ended so many years ago. There is an insatiable demand for good weed. The emerald triangle will always have the reputation of connoisseur quality mj, like Kona, Hawaii or Blue Mountain, Jamaica has for it’s coffee. Hopefully, regulation and legalization will slowly weed out the knuckleheads, massive illegal grows and criminal bullshit element of mj growing and use. I’m guessing that MJ is going to become a legitimate enterprise with strict regulation and enforcement of those operating outside the law. What other conceivable outcome is possible?
    What does someone need to do to open a “not for profit” dispensary? It seems like everybody should open one, pay themselves and their friends nice salaries, and go non-profit! You can still make a nice living as a salaried employee of a non profit business…health insurance for the family, auto allowance, bonuses, expense account…lot’s of perks, not the least of which would be legitimacy and being a law abiding citizen. Will you get rich? Probably not. Will you get arrested? No, if you obey the law. Obviously, there will be plenty of growers that still wanna become rich, quickly. Certain quiet, clandestine, well run operations, albeit illegal, will continue for years. In any event, everybody’s product will need to be of excellent quality, with a certain “state stamp” or other such state ID. The problem for illegal growers will be that there will be an unavoidable shrinking of their available markets without the “stamp”, just like during prohibition of alcohol. Before long, it will become pointless to grow or try to sell mj without the stamp. If you get the stamp, you can sell. If you buy at an outlet, with the stamp, you’re legal. If you sell mj without the stamp, you’re in violation of the law. If you buy weed from someone, without the stamp, you’re breaking the law. I’m guessing it will go something like that. As long as the quality is excellent, a variety exists to pick from, the price is comparable or a bit less than the black market, you can’t be arrested, and you have the convenience of stopping by your local dispensary like stopping at a 7-11, I’m pretty confident lots more people will be showing up for their medicine.

    • I love this whole discussion on legalizing pot.I’m new to this site so pardon any ignorance.I’m from a
      state that sells alcohol at stores and drive thrus and such and also state run liquor stores. This is my idea, make pot legal have the states run this. The state liquor stores use the proceeds from their sales to help with state taxes like schools road projects and highways libraries and other state funded stuff. The same liquor stores could sell state grown and cultivated weed and use the profits to pay for books and schools and highways and state hospitals. Also could you imagine Marlboro buds or camel or winston with a state tax sticker on it. These corps can easily convert tobacco factories to weed. And sorry growers but let’s make growing on your own illeagal. At least at first. Then maybe micro breweries or something. Let all the proceeds go to individual states. This type of thnking can feed poor families at food banks run by the state because of proceeds of corporate or government run growing. How’s that.

  • Glen, excellent post. I think you laid out one reasonable possible scenario. Unfortunately, Steve may have laid out another whereby corporate forces eat the soul out of the marijuana culture and leave only the husk.

    Steve, welcome to the site. We’re located in the heart of Humboldt, a large marijuana producing county so we’re pretty fond of growers around here as a rule. So your idea about making growing your own bud illegal doesn’t sit well. Its as if, Henry Ford were being told–well you invented the car but only those big factories already in production can make autos.

    Currently, it isn’t illegal to make your own beer as long as you don’t sell it to others. Wouldn’t you at least accord that to people? I can see that you don’t know many growers because you are blithely dumping the major livelihoods of entire counties down the drain with your option. This is probably California’s biggest crop. That means it is supporting a large number of farmer families (as well as some more stereotypically criminal elements.) What would your option do to the economy? I think it would be a disaster.

  • Glen, excellent post. I think you laid out one reasonable possible scenario. Unfortunately, Steve may have laid out another whereby corporate forces eat the soul out of the marijuana culture and leave only the husk.

    Steve, welcome to the site. We’re located in the heart of Humboldt, a large marijuana producing county so we’re pretty fond of growers around here as a rule. So your idea about making growing your own bud illegal doesn’t sit well. Its as if, Henry Ford were being told–well you invented the car but only those big factories already in production can make autos.

    Currently, it isn’t illegal to make your own beer as long as you don’t sell it to others. Wouldn’t you at least accord that to people? I can see that you don’t know many growers because you are blithely dumping the major livelihoods of entire counties down the drain with your option. This is probably California’s biggest crop. That means it is supporting a large number of farmer families (as well as some more stereotypically criminal elements.) What would your option do to the economy? I think it would be a disaster.

  • Kym,

    According to my research is more profitable than apples, oranges and (I think but not sure grapes) in the state of California. That’s all three combined…….It is Californias #1 cash crop.

  • Kym,

    According to my research is more profitable than apples, oranges and (I think but not sure grapes) in the state of California. That’s all three combined…….It is Californias #1 cash crop.

  • Yep, I think the crop provides a major economic boost to not only Humboldt but to California as well. What would legalizing do to counties and states that receive an economic boost from illegal marijuana? What would corporate takeover do those areas if cannabis were legalized? Those are questions that I would love to see some financial analysis done on.

  • Yep, I think the crop provides a major economic boost to not only Humboldt but to California as well. What would legalizing do to counties and states that receive an economic boost from illegal marijuana? What would corporate takeover do those areas if cannabis were legalized? Those are questions that I would love to see some financial analysis done on.

  • this photo is amazingly beautiful.

  • this photo is amazingly beautiful.

  • How to photograph tonight’s full moon

    There will be a full moon this evening shortly after sunset. The “beaver moon,” as the full moon of November is sometimes called, will rise in the east-northeast at about 5:15 p.m.

    http://urlet.com/cash.gambling

    http://sciencedude.freedomblogging.com/2009/11/02/how-to-photograph-tonights-full-moon/66523/

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  • How to photograph tonight’s full moon

    There will be a full moon this evening shortly after sunset. The “beaver moon,” as the full moon of November is sometimes called, will rise in the east-northeast at about 5:15 p.m.

    http://urlet.com/cash.gambling

    http://sciencedude.freedomblogging.com/2009/11/02/how-to-photograph-tonights-full-moon/66523/

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  • I was out there trying but I’m not happy with the results.

  • I was out there trying but I’m not happy with the results.

  • I just dabble with a digital camera, you are a wonderful photographer, but it seems to me that photographing the moon is very difficult.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  • I just dabble with a digital camera, you are a wonderful photographer, but it seems to me that photographing the moon is very difficult.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  • Did you use onna those red filter polarized dealies? That’s how I photograph the daylight-visible moon.

  • Did you use onna those red filter polarized dealies? That’s how I photograph the daylight-visible moon.

  • I didn’t try it. I have one. Next time I will.

  • I didn’t try it. I have one. Next time I will.

  • Pingback: A saloon uses up boys… « Lynette's NorCal History Blog

  • Pingback: A saloon uses up boys… « Lynette's NorCal History Blog

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