Morning Walk

running water

Up the Crick

Sun tiptoed in and out of clouds. Ice formed on still water. Bundled, I slipped out for a walk.

The flowers know that April is opening its door so they are putting on a show. I saw Shooting Star, Baby Blue Eyes, Houndstongue, Trillium budding, Wild Gorse, Wild Current, Saxifrage, Pink Milkmaids, Ceanothis budding, Wild Lupine, Wild Strawberry, Colombine, and several flowers I couldn’t name (nor get a good photo of.)

shooting Stars

Shooting Star

Houndstounge

Houndstongue

bird

Bird’s Nest in Poison Oak

 

 

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18 comments

  • Woke up to a big frost this a.m., after a huge pouring rainstorm yesterday afternoon. Spring is all confused!

    Your flower (and the creek) photos are beautiful. How do you recognize poison oak this time of year? Perhaps you just know where it is? And…do birds get poison oak??? Maybe the answer is found in the empty nest!

  • If you look just above the nest on the left side of the photo, there are some tiny red leaves. Thin branches, no main trunk, generally shoulder to head high–almost always Poison Oak.

    I’m pretty sure birds don’t get Poison Oak because they use it as protection a lot.

  • Were there leprechauns hiding near the creek? I’m sure there must have been one somewhere amongst all that green.

    All the pictures were very nice but the first one was especially spectacular.

  • Beautiful photos Kym. Is that miner’s lettuce in the creek photo? I do like miner’s lettuce. I was hiking with a friend the other day and he stopped and ate the leaf bud from a poison oak vine. Says it gives him immunity. Don’t try this at home! It seems to me that the triliiums up there are different than the ones down here by the river. I’m seeing the little Calypso orchids in the redwoods. Like jewels.

  • Thanks Mom, I really like that one too. It was so beautiful there this morning.

    Ben, If you could blow the pic up you would see that those leaves have rounded teeth. They aren’t smooth like miner’s lettuce. I don’t know what they are. I was going to look them up but I forgot. I’ll try to remember to do it tomorrow.

  • Anyone who eats poison oak is either braver or stupider than I want to be 8)

    Ben, what is the dif between WakeRobins and Trilliums. Would that account for the difference found between Trilliums here and down there?

  • That’s some crazy kind of beautiful…

  • We have some trilliums in our backyard. Not blooming yet, but soon.

    Myrna might remember Lillian Hurlbutt (maybe some of you other SoHums, too). As a child she ate poison oak because the Indians told her it would make her immune. She almost died, but never had poison oak again.

  • The Indians should have thought of that sooner–a safe way to get rid of the white man.

  • Wow, Kym such totally gorgeous flowers, and photographs:)

    I love them. I love spring too, but we don’t have four seasons back where I am:(

  • Every place is beautiful in its own way. That is why I have a whole category on my blogroll for people who love where they live. Alaska Steve lives in this (shh don’t tell him I said this) miserable snow blasted landscape. But he loves it so much that his writing and his photographs almost make me want to move there. And I hate snow!

  • Kym… I think Wake Robin is another name for Trillium but the Trilliums I remember from up near you are distinctly different from the redwood forest variety. I also remember some kind of lily that had green bell shaped flowers. I’ve never seen them anywhere else.

  • I’ll try and get some photos up and we’ll see if we can identify them.

  • Such beauty.

    May I be prosaic and ask what equipment you use? The results are wonderful.

    [blogrolled in envy]

  • Archie,
    I hadn’t realized when I commented on your blog that you were a fan of Max’s too. Sometimes blogging is a small world.

    I just have a small digital kodak Easyshare M873. But for such a small nothing of a camera, it does great. I love it. I just wish I could get telephoto lens for wildlife. We have such incredible fauna up here.

  • Ah yes, the wonderful Max. Love her writing 🙂

    I began my photography with a little Pentax optio (3.2 mega pixels) but because I wanted to be able to get into trees and snap birds I did the bank-breaking thing and got a SLR (pentax istDS) and now I keep finding excuses to buy new lenses and filters! For some reason, I am always poor these days 🙂

  • I’ve been hungering for something I could take wildlife photos with. In the last few days, as per usual, I’ve seen heron, wild turkeys, coyotes, deer, grouse, lots of different birds but when I take pictures—blah, they look like little specks of dust.

    I have secret hopes that Mother’s Day or our Anniversary will lead to a new camera.

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